Montana Outdoors

May 4, 2018

Three violets

Hookedspur Violet, Early Blue Violet

Hookedspur Violet, Early Blue Violet ~ Viola adunca

Goosefoot Violet

Goosefoot Violet ~ Viola purpurea

Small White Violet

Small White Violet ~ Viola macloskeyi

Today was the first time that I’ve found these three species in one day, and all were within a half mile besides. It was a surprise also because they are growing within the periphery of the huge forest fire that occurred here last year. (Now if I can figure out why three different colored flowers are all called “violets”.)

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31 Comments »

  1. How strange that the species name purpurea corresponds to a plant with yellow flowers.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — May 4, 2018 @ 10:18 pm

  2. Lovely! They remind me of the Johnny Jump Ups that used to come up every year in my garden.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candice — May 4, 2018 @ 10:32 pm

  3. The veins in the petals really add an interesting design.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 4, 2018 @ 10:36 pm

  4. Lovely shots of a flowers that most of us just walk right by!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by centralohionature — May 5, 2018 @ 3:36 am

    • I’m happy to find them! The white and yellow took a little work: they were growing in a small bog supplied by a spring. Beautiful little place but the water was cold!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 5, 2018 @ 8:03 am

  5. I applaud your willingness to undertake identifying them. Violets aren’t the easiest as I’m sure you know.
    I wish we had the yellow ones here. I never see them.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 5, 2018 @ 3:06 pm

    • I’m never entirely sure about the ID’s on these, but there is pretty good information on plants in this area from the Burke Museum at the University of Washington. They focus on the Pacific Northwest and a little further inland.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 5, 2018 @ 3:23 pm

  6. Your yellow and white violets remind me of our white and yellow bluebonnets! Sometimes, things just don’t make sense. I did read somewhere that the name of the color was taken from the flower, rather than the other way around. It’s confusing, so I’ll just admire the flowers. It does appear that the “runway markings” on them all are purple, though. That’s pretty interesting, too. They are lovely. We used to fill our little May baskets with them when I was a kid.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 5, 2018 @ 10:33 pm

    • It’s strange, but I don’t remember picking violets for those May baskets. They were mostly Shooting Stars and Yellow Bells, and then later we would pick Bitterroots.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 6, 2018 @ 7:35 am

  7. How wonderful to find the new life of these three violets all where the huge forest fire occurred last year!!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — May 6, 2018 @ 7:42 am

    • In all fires like that there are places within their perimeter that are relatively untouched, areas where the fire was so intense it sterilized the ground, and every condition in between.These are in an large clearing where the intensity of the fire just skipped overhead during one of it’s runs where it travelled about ten miles in that one day, pushed by the wind.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 6, 2018 @ 8:01 am

  8. Wow, all in one day!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by heartandsoul974 — May 6, 2018 @ 10:19 am

  9. How pretty they are too.
    I don’t think I’ve ever seen a yellow violet. I’ve only seen purple and white varieties. I love the smell but they wilt quickly so I’m not sure why they sell bunches in florist shops. Perhaps they’re used like in medieval England to express love and affection to the recipient.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — May 7, 2018 @ 6:57 pm

    • Yes, they are pretty fragile little flowers. The white and yellow ones were growing right in the water of a spring.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 7, 2018 @ 7:12 pm

  10. Excellent Violets presentation.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — May 8, 2018 @ 12:43 am

  11. Ah violas .. such lovely sweet flowers. And growing where those fires were ..

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — May 8, 2018 @ 3:01 am

    • Fortunately they were in their dormant stage when the fire went through and have come up now in areas where the fire was not intense enough to sterilize the soil. In general the flowers are doing quite well is such areas, but in much of the center part of this fire it was so intense that nothing survived: plants will have to return from new seeding, mostly by the birds I think.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 8, 2018 @ 8:46 am

  12. I love violets! The purple ones are my favorite though and I have a collection of tea cups, saucers, and teapots with those dainty little wildflowers on them.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — May 9, 2018 @ 6:21 am

    • The purple ones are my favorites, although I’m happy to see the others too.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 9, 2018 @ 7:24 am

  13. I was going to say that they really don’t look very similar to each other. It looks like even their leaves don’t look much alike so why all violets, indeed?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — May 9, 2018 @ 9:17 pm

    • I understand little about the classification of flowers, but these are all part of the violet family.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 9, 2018 @ 9:39 pm


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