Montana Outdoors

July 28, 2017

In the thick of things

Spring Creek

What can be found in a thick tangle of brush like this? Well, there is water, and a few rays of sunlight filtering through the trees, and the green things of the wilderness will find and use both, and as you push your way through the foliage, interesting things appear.

Blue Elderberry

Blue Elderberry ~ Sambuscus caerulea

Pathfinder

Pathfinder

Clustered Thistle

Clustered Thistle ~ Cirsium brevistylum

Great Mullein

Great Mullein

Great Mullein~ Verbascum thapsus

Devil's Club

Devil's Club

Devil’s Club ~ Oplopanax horridus

Unknown

Enchanter’s Nightshade ~ Circaea alpina

Clustered Thistle

Clustered Thistle

Advertisements

July 26, 2017

A short hike on USFS trail 223 ~ July 11, 2017

Sometimes it’s nice to begin a hike with a pleasant scene.

Clark Fork River

USFS trail 223 starts along the river at an elevation of about 2,400 feet, climbs up and over a small hill then proceeds up the river for another 7 or 8 miles. In their seasons, wildflowers along it are diverse and plentiful. Those included in this post are the late-season ones.

Trail 223

Common Evening Primrose

Evening Primrose (Oenothera villosa): the first one I had seen this year.

Bluebell-of-Scotland

These bluebells are everywhere this time of year and I can seldom pass up a chance to photograph them.

Trail 223

As the trail enters the lower and most dense part of the forest, the color is intense.

three-leaf foamflower

The shade-loving Three-leaf Foamflower ~ Tiarella trifoliata 

Devil's Club

The berries of the Devil’s Club (Oplopanax horridus) are just beginning to turn red.

Bluebell-of-Scotland

Bluebell-of-Scotland

I did mention that I love these bluebells, didn’t I?

Slender Hawkweed

Slender Hawkweed

Slender Hawkweed ~ Hieracium triste

Western Blud Clematis

The seed head of the Blue Clematis, (Clematis occidentalis)

Trail 223

Trail 223

I love the steeper parts of this trail: there is a small stream below.

Pearly Everlasting

Another flower which grows at just about all elevations, Pearly Everlasting (Anaphalis margaritacea).

Clasping Twisted-stalk fruit

These are the fruit of the Clasping Twisted-stalk (Streptopus amplexifolius) which is a plant that I have seen in only two locations. It is interesting because the flowers and fruit appear on the underside of the leaves.

White Sweet-clover

White Sweet-clover ~ Melilotus albus

July 2, 2017

End of June flowers (well, almost)

Deptford pink

Deptford pink ~ Dianthus armeria

Can't identify

Bluebell-of-Scotland, Harebell

Bluebell-of-Scotland, Harebell ~ Campanula rotundifolia

Mock Orange

Mock Orange ~ Philadelphus lewisii

Birch-leaved Spiraea

Birch-leaved Spiraea ~ Spiraea betulifolia

Devil's Club

Devil’s Club ~ Oplopanax horridus

DSC_4232

(It is these spines that give the Devil’s Club its name)

Brewer's mitrewort, feathery bishop's-cap

Brewer’s mitrewort, feathery bishop’s-cap ~ Pectiantia breweri

Harsh Indian Paintbrush

Harsh Indian Paintbrush ~ Castilleja hispida

Fringed Loosestrife

Fringed Loosestrife ~ Lysimachia ciliata

Tiling's monkey-flower, large mountain monkey-flower

Tiling’s monkey-flower, large mountain monkey-flower~ Erythranthe tilingii

sulphur cinquefoil

Sulphur Cinquefoil ~ Potentilla recta

Meadow Buttercup

Meadow Buttercup ~ Ranunculus acris

June 18, 2012

In a cedar forest

Filed under: Spring Creek — Tags: , — montucky @ 9:06 pm

Devil's Club

Beneath the cedars

Beneath the cedars

Beneath the cedars

The very large leaves in these photos belong to a plant aptly called “Devil’s Club”, Oplopanax horridus; note the large sharp spines. It grows up to 9 feet tall and the leaves get up to 14 inches across. A flower bud is visible in the first photo: it will turn into white blossoms followed by bright red fruit. I will try to remember to follow up with photos of both later in the summer. I found there is a reason for the species name horridus after having accidentally making contact with some of the spines.

September 22, 2011

“horridus”?

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 10:33 pm

Devil's Club

Devil's Club

Devil's Club

Devil’s Club ~ Oplopanax horridus

Every time I see the species name of this plant it occurs to me that the person who named it probably came into contact with its spines. The stems and even the underside of the leaves are heavily armed with large spines which readily break off when one comes in contact with them and the resulting wound soon festers if the spine stays embedded in the skin.

Devil’s Club is a member of the ginseng family, growing up to ten feet tall with leaves over 14 inches across and various parts of it have been used by native peoples to treat a large array of ailments. It is found in Canada in Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and in the Yukon, and in the states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Washington, Oregon and Michigan (where it is listed as “threatened”).

These photos were taken in Spring Creek Canyon, where the plant is plentiful. This year I missed the blossoms which are small and white and grow in dense clusters at the ends of the stems. The bright red berries are not edible.

October 19, 2008

Center stage

Center stage

Devil’s Club (Oplopanax horridus) turning to Autumn yellow in Spring Creek canyon.

Older Posts »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.