Montana Outdoors

June 25, 2017

The procession continues

Once the weather warmed up the wildflowers began to bloom with new species starting every day. It is hard to keep up with all of them.

Narrow-leaf Mountain-trumpet

Narrow-leaf Mountain-trumpet ~ Collomia linearis

Hound's Tongue

Hound’s Tongue ~ Cynoglossum officinale

American Vetch

American Vetch ~ Vicia americana

American Vetch and Bumble

Early Blue Violet

Viper's-bugloss

Viper’s-bugloss ~ Echium vulgare

Rose bud

American twinflower

American twinflower ~ Linnaea borealis

Queen's Cup

Queen’s Cup ~ Clintonia uniflora

White Sweet-vetch

White Sweet-vetch ~ Hedysarum sulphurescens

American speedwell

American speedwell ~ Veronica americana

Yellow Clover

Yellow Clover ~ Trifolium aureum

Bird's-foot Trefoil

Bird’s-foot Trefoil ~ Lotus corniculatus

Sulphur Penstemon

Sulphur Penstemon ~ Penstemon attenuatus

Oxeye Daisy

Oxeye Daisy ~ Leucanthemum vulgare

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29 Comments »

  1. I don’t think we have as many as you have there in Montana. The number of different wildflowers in your area is amazing!

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 25, 2017 @ 12:46 pm

    • Yes, I was very surprised when I started to count all of the different species, and I know there are still many here that I have not yet come across and some in the general area but not in the specific places I have visited.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2017 @ 12:57 pm

  2. Nice! A Great assortment visually! Fun to see and also see the names listed.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Reed Andariese — June 25, 2017 @ 12:49 pm

    • Some of the names have been very difficult to find initially, and the common names vary all over the place and in many cases the “experts” don’t even agree. It’s a challenge, but interesting and I hope my photos help researchers at least in some cases.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2017 @ 1:01 pm

  3. Makes one want to be outside more

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by John Purdy — June 25, 2017 @ 2:31 pm

    • Me too! This time of year I get out as much as possible.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2017 @ 6:06 pm

  4. You have some really beautiful flowers there!
    That looks like an orchid after the shot of the bee on the vetch, but I don’t know its name. It’s a beauty though.
    I recognize 4 or 5 of them but most I’ve never seen. I’d love to find that orchid here.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 25, 2017 @ 3:49 pm

    • I’m constantly fascinated that each side of the country has so many flowers unique to itself. Possibly the amount of annual precipitation has something to do with that. I think you get almost three times as much as we do here.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2017 @ 6:12 pm

  5. Lovely procession to continue for eternity.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — June 25, 2017 @ 4:44 pm

  6. I agree, so hard to keep up with the flowers. Seeing some go to seed already has my heart in a bit of a panic, no not yet!
    Your photos are lovely.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Tammie — June 25, 2017 @ 5:02 pm

    • I’ve had that feeling more this year than ever before! Maybe because I looked forward to this summer more than usual and hate to see it going by so quickly.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2017 @ 6:15 pm

  7. What a stunning array. The Bird’s-foot Trefoil is a favourite. The American Twinflower almost looks like a Columbine. The Vetch reminds me of one of ours in Australia. Are any of these around your home? Or just higher up the mountains?

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Vicki — June 25, 2017 @ 5:38 pm

    • Many of these (vetch, Bugloss, daisy, clover and Hound’s tongue) are found at valley level. Some of the others grow at low elevations, but require a forest setting.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2017 @ 6:19 pm

  8. The yellow clover’s wonderful, but I especially liked seeing the bird’s foot trefoil. When I was trying to identify a yellow flower here (which turned out to be a different pea) I thought for a while it might have been the trefoil, and I learned all about it while finding out that it wasn’t. It’s a beautiful flower — one of my favorites in that family.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by shoreacres — June 25, 2017 @ 7:07 pm

    • That’s definitely one that I look forward to seeing every year. But there are so many about which I can say the same thing…

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2017 @ 7:14 pm

  9. Beautiful photographs and each flower is beautiful in it’s own unique way, but I’m partial to the second photo, the Hound’s Tongue. Something about the colors …

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by teresaevangeline — June 25, 2017 @ 7:09 pm

    • My favorite wildflower book calls it a “weed introduced from Europe” and apparently there are problems associated with it. I have seen only a few plants in this area (less than a dozen) and those were far apart. I also really like the blossoms. The plant in the photo grows along with one more along a trail access road several miles from the nearest highway and over a dozen miles from the nearest town. Seems to be a long way from Europe and hard to imagine how it got way back here.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2017 @ 7:21 pm

      • What a cool backstory. I love the remoteness it seems to have chosen. Maybe it knew it would need a good hideout. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by teresaevangeline — June 25, 2017 @ 8:29 pm

  10. Love the Hound’s Tongue and Viper’s-bugloss!

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Candace — June 26, 2017 @ 9:27 pm

  11. The flowers are truly amazing!!

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Hanna — June 27, 2017 @ 3:51 pm

    • They are! It’s hard to believe that there are so many different species in just this area alone.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2017 @ 7:32 pm

  12. Beautiful! Is that a bumble bee enjoying the vetch?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — June 30, 2017 @ 1:55 pm

    • Yes. They seem to have a special fondness for that flower: I often see one feeding on it.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 30, 2017 @ 4:14 pm


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