Montana Outdoors

May 24, 2017

They come in yellow, too.

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 8:02 pm

Yellow Indian Paintbrush

Yellow Indian Paintbrush ~ Castilleja lutescens

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15 Comments »

  1. Color YELLOW signifies AUSPICIOUSNESS. Congrats. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — May 24, 2017 @ 10:21 pm

  2. Thanks for always giving the scientific names too. I like to see what is blooming in MT and compare it with ID. I think we are a bit behind. Can you state what kind of camera you use and if you have a close up lens, just curious. Thanks for sharing these great pictures.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Anonymous — May 25, 2017 @ 8:04 am

    • I use two cameras. One is a Nikon D80 and for that I have a 60mm close-up lens that I just love. It produces the best quality! The one that I have been using most lately is Nikon 1 J5 using just a regular10-30mm lens with a 10mm extension tube for very small flowers. The D80 weighs over 2 lbs and the J5 only half a pound, so I use it a lot, especially for the more strenuous hikes.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 25, 2017 @ 6:16 pm

  3. I didn’t know that and have never seen one. Just when you think you’ve seen it all, along comes Montucky to enlighten you. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 25, 2017 @ 9:31 am

    • They aren’t exactly rare, but not nearly a plentiful as the red ones. This one is more true yellow than any I have seen before, and interestingly, it is growing within the area of last summer’s Copper King fire.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 25, 2017 @ 6:18 pm

  4. I didn’t know that. I think I like the red better but it’s still a pretty flower!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 25, 2017 @ 3:10 pm

    • I like the red much better and the orange also. There is one that grows only in a small area of Washington state, Castilleja ambigua, which has both bright yellow and white on its top. I’d love to see that one!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 25, 2017 @ 6:20 pm

  5. Our Texas variety occasional pops up in yellow or white, and sometimes red. The red/maroon has been cultivated by the experts at Texas A&M, since their school colors are maroon and white, but I haven’t seen it in the wild. That yellow and white combo sounds wonderful. It’s such fun to look and look for a flower, and then have it suddenly “there.” I looked for our white prickly poppies seemingly forever, and then finally found some. Once I did, I saw them everywhere! Maybe your Castilleja ambigua will show up in your area. Once would be enough! (And that name is hilarious.)

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 25, 2017 @ 8:28 pm

    • There are several wildflowers native to this area that I haven’t yet seen, but I seem to come across a few every year that are new to me. Today I took a quick count and found that I have photographed 8 different species of wild orchids, but I can’t remember seeing more than four of them in a single year. Problem is, I can’t be everywhere at the same time, much as I might try.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 25, 2017 @ 8:39 pm

      • That, I understand. There are so many places that I’d like to go, just to see what I can see — but if I go west, I can’ t go east, and so on. Still, the beauty of it is that no matter where we end up, there’s something to see!

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by shoreacres — May 25, 2017 @ 8:42 pm

  6. I don’t think I’ve ever seen it in yellow.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — May 26, 2017 @ 6:35 pm

    • They are much less common than the red ones. This one has the most yellow of any I’ve seen.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 26, 2017 @ 7:06 pm


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