Montana Outdoors

July 13, 2014

Seldom seen

Filed under: Montana — Tags: , , , — montucky @ 10:42 pm

Mountain Hollyhock

Mountain Hollyhock, Wild Hollyhock ~ Lliamna rivularis

These are seldom seen in this area, but worth looking out for.

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38 Comments »

  1. So beautiful. Hard to believe they’re wild and not cultivated.

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    Comment by Vicki — July 14, 2014 @ 3:20 am

    • I was surprised too when I first found them, although they are far from any town. Just this one species and I’ve read that they are very difficult to propagate.

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      Comment by montucky — July 14, 2014 @ 8:54 pm

  2. They’re beautiful. They remind me of the mallow (Malva alcea) plant that I just found.

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    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — July 14, 2014 @ 4:17 am

    • Yes, they are really pretty. I wish there were lots more around!

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      Comment by montucky — July 14, 2014 @ 8:55 pm

  3. What a beautiful colour they have. Different from other hollyhocks.

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    Comment by wordsfromanneli — July 14, 2014 @ 7:32 am

    • Yes, it’s a very pleasant color and a beautiful plant! I don’t understand why it has such a limited range and isn’t more abundant.

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      Comment by montucky — July 14, 2014 @ 8:56 pm

      • Not hardy under many conditions and not a strong plant? Some plants are hard to kill; others are hard to keep alive.

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        Comment by wordsfromanneli — July 14, 2014 @ 9:18 pm

  4. Pretty … similar look to the wild roses here (5 pink petals … even the centers are a closematch) .. but, roses not growing in tight clumps together like that.

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    Comment by bearyweather — July 14, 2014 @ 9:17 am

    • The flowers have characteristics like some others, but the whole plant grows like a hollyhock.

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      Comment by montucky — July 14, 2014 @ 8:58 pm

  5. What an unusual color. These are really beautiful!

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    Comment by Sue — July 14, 2014 @ 9:40 am

    • Yes, they have a very pleasant color and a delicate , soft look to them.

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      Comment by montucky — July 14, 2014 @ 8:58 pm

  6. Reblogged this on Silver Threading and commented:
    The deep lavender of this Mountain Hollyhock found in Montana is breathtaking!

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    Comment by Colleen Chesebro — July 14, 2014 @ 11:33 am

  7. Awesome image Terry !!

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    Comment by Bernie Kasper — July 14, 2014 @ 1:21 pm

    • As so often happens, an unsuccessful fishing trip produced some pretty pictures!

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      Comment by montucky — July 14, 2014 @ 9:00 pm

  8. Even better if seldom seen.

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    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — July 14, 2014 @ 9:13 pm

    • Well, I don’t know. I’d love to see more of these around.

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      Comment by montucky — July 15, 2014 @ 8:02 am

      • I think I wrote in too condensed a way. What I meant is that because these orchids are seldom seen, it’s great that you found one.

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        Comment by Steve Schwartzman — July 15, 2014 @ 8:23 am

        • I know, and I feel that way about this and many of our wildflowers. This is one though that is large enough to get people’s attention and they would appreciate them as opposed to some of the tiny ones that everyone ignores.

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          Comment by montucky — July 15, 2014 @ 9:14 am

  9. I’ve always known hollyhocks as a garden plant. They were such a favorite in the midwest, and probably still are. The color of this one’s gorgeous, and the clustering of the blooms seems different from the cultivated forms. We often made hollyhock dolls when I was a kid.

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    Comment by shoreacres — July 15, 2014 @ 6:29 am

    • We have planted seeds at the house but never had much luck. I remember when I was a kid we grew them quite easily.

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      Comment by montucky — July 15, 2014 @ 8:03 am

  10. Beautiful flower…excellent image, too…nice and crisp. Well done, Terry. 🙂

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    Comment by seekraz — July 15, 2014 @ 10:37 am

  11. I have hollyhocks again. They didn’t show up the last two summers in any great number. I believe the cultivated are every other year (or so) bloomers. I’m so glad to see them return. These mountain hollyhocks are gorgeous. Your photograph … beautiful. What a soothing color.

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    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — July 15, 2014 @ 4:33 pm

    • We planted some but they are not doing well. These wild ones are doing exceptionally well. A difference in gardeners, I guess.

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      Comment by montucky — July 15, 2014 @ 7:28 pm

  12. Hi ! … That is a really beautiful flower … // Maria 🙂

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    Comment by mariayarri — July 16, 2014 @ 4:55 am

  13. Hi Montucky, I have never seen wild Hollyhocks – only those in backyard gardens. Your floral photography is wonderful! Have a pleasant day tomorrow.

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    Comment by wildlifewatcher — July 17, 2014 @ 3:44 pm

    • THey have a very strange distribution, found only in: USA (CO, ID, IL, IN, MT, NV, OR, UT, VA, WA, WY), CAN (AB, BC)

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      Comment by montucky — July 17, 2014 @ 10:25 pm

  14. They look like they’re already in a bouquet, a natural bouquet…beautiful, delicate color.

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    Comment by Candace — July 17, 2014 @ 7:26 pm

    • Yes, it’s difficult to choose which grouping of the blossoms you want to photograph.

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      Comment by montucky — July 17, 2014 @ 10:27 pm

  15. pretty purple pink!

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    Comment by Mary Strong-Spaid — July 19, 2014 @ 4:25 pm

  16. entirely lovely~

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    Comment by Tammie — July 21, 2014 @ 6:51 pm

  17. Very beautiful. I have never seen it.

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    Comment by Sartenada — July 24, 2014 @ 2:09 am

    • This has a very limited area where it lives and there don’t seem to be very many of them.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — July 24, 2014 @ 6:45 pm


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