Montana Outdoors

August 9, 2013

Cabinet Mountains Wilderness ~ Devil’s Club Trail # 966

Photos from a hike on 8/7/13 with a good friend. We didn’t get as far as we planned, but were not too disappointed. Made a note to see that part of the wilderness from another access point. The photos will give you an idea of what the trail was like.

Devil's Club trail #966

Devil's Club trail map

Wild hollyhock

Wild hollyhock ~ Iliamna rivularis

Wild hollyhock

Along trail 966

Douglas' spirea, rose spirea

Douglas’ spirea, rose spirea ~ Spiraea douglasii

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Crossing Devil’s Club Creek

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Tiling's monkey-flower

Tiling’s monkey-flower ~ Erythranthe tilingi

Brewer's mitrewort,feathery bishop's-cap

Brewer's mitrewort,feathery bishop's-cap

Brewer's mitrewort,feathery bishop's-cap

Brewer’s mitrewort,feathery bishop’s-cap ~ Pectiantia breweri: This flower was new to me and I may not have the correct identification for it.

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966. The patches of snow are on St Paul Peak

The patches of snow are on St Paul Peak

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Along trail 966

Indian Pipes

Indian Pipes

Orange Hawkweed

Orange Hawkweed

Orange Hawkweed ~ Hieracium ayrantiacum

Fringed grass-of-Parnassus

Fringed grass of-Parnassus ~ Parnassia fimbriata

Columbian Monkshood

Columbian Monkshood

Along trail 966

Devil's Club

Devil’s Club

Twisted Stalk berries

Twisted Stalk berries

Along trail 966

37 Comments »

  1. What amazing scenery and wildflowers. Lovely photos.
    Thanks of sharing your walk.

    Like

    Comment by victoriaaphotographyictoria — August 10, 2013 @ 12:41 am

    • This area gets the most rainfall in the state and so it stays green and lush all summer. It’s a great place to be now.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 10, 2013 @ 1:51 pm

  2. Wow, what stunning landscapes and flowers. Thank you for posting these! From the map, it looks like a steep hike! I really love the mountain views, and the snow still lingering on the peaks. Spectacular!

    Like

    Comment by Jo Woolf — August 10, 2013 @ 1:11 am

    • Yes, there are some pretty steep parts to those trails. The contour intervals on the map are 200 feet . You don’t have to cross too may to feel it. Sure is worth the effort though!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 10, 2013 @ 1:53 pm

  3. Fantastic photos, thanks for showing us around such a wonderful place, I’m actually feeling quite upset I can’t go there today 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Mike Howe — August 10, 2013 @ 3:10 am

  4. I love the waterfalls, and the wild hollyhock is beautiful. I’ve never seen or heard of it. The brewer’s mitrewort is interesting-it’s another one I’ve never heard of.

    Like

    Comment by New Hampshire Gardener — August 10, 2013 @ 5:47 am

    • I’ve seen the hollyhock before but the miterwort is a new one for me. The Fringe grass of Parnassus is only the second sighting for me too, as is the Monkshood. I have already decided to visit the CMW earlier next summer to catch more of the flowers in bloom. I was very surprised to see thimbleberry still in bloom along one of the small creeks. Elsewhere they are bearing the last of their fruit.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 10, 2013 @ 1:58 pm

      • The thimbleberry might point towards some kind of micro climate influenced by altitude. I’ve seen it happen before, with frosts up to three weeks later than the surrounding countryside.

        Like

        Comment by New Hampshire Gardener — August 11, 2013 @ 7:01 am

  5. Hi Montucky, Another virtual hike – quite refreshing to see snow. It is gonna be HOT today here in FL. Love the Hollyhocks and the other flowers. Nice pictures. Glad you had fun. Have a great weekend!

    Like

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — August 10, 2013 @ 8:10 am

    • It’s hot here too by our standards, but probably not nearly as hot as there! Have a great day!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 10, 2013 @ 1:59 pm

  6. As always, I think you need to contact Far Country Press in Helena and propose a book filled with all these wonderful pictures.

    Malcolm

    Like

    Comment by Malcolm R. Campbell — August 10, 2013 @ 8:33 am

  7. Beautiful photos of a pristine wilderness.

    Like

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — August 10, 2013 @ 10:48 am

    • Much of the CMW is still pristine. I plan to visit the less traveled places first and perhaps try a couple of the popular trails when the snow starts to fall and the traffic has died down.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 10, 2013 @ 2:01 pm

  8. Thanks for the hike. It’s beautiful. I also appreciate the flower close ups and the signs. I’m a sucker for trail signs.

    Like

    Comment by badwalker — August 10, 2013 @ 11:35 am

    • I’m glad that you like it! I’ve decided to post more photos so to give a better idea of what these places are like.
      I’m also a sucker for trail signs and have quite a collection of photos of them. Many in the more remote parts of the roadless areas go back to the 1920’s and 1930’s and it’s amazing how well preserved most of them are.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 10, 2013 @ 2:08 pm

  9. What a fantastic hike you took us with you on ! And your photos are great, as always . // Maria 🙂

    Like

    Comment by mariayarri — August 10, 2013 @ 3:23 pm

    • I’m glad you enjoy it Maria. I know there will be many more to come. I am studying the maps and making plans. What a world this is!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 10, 2013 @ 10:57 pm

  10. Just Wow. Montana is on my bucket list thanks to you.

    Like

    Comment by jomegat — August 10, 2013 @ 5:35 pm

    • I hope you get a chance to see it for your self some day. If I’m still around I’ll be happy to be your guide!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 10, 2013 @ 10:58 pm

  11. You seem to have a really high proportion of “feathery” flowers, like the Bishop’s Cap. The Hawkweed is beautiful – so vibrant. I’m starting to see a few that I recognize, like Indian Pipe. It’s like meeting an old friend along the trail.

    Like

    Comment by shoreacres — August 10, 2013 @ 6:38 pm

    • The total number of different flower species here is mind-boggling. In just the thousand square miles that seems to be my hiking territory I have identified well over 200 different species. Now that I’m adding the 147 square miles of the CMW to that territory it appears that it will also add many more new species to that number. I’ve found four new ones on just two hikes recently and at a bad time of the year for flowers. If only I could know how they all fit into the whole of this ecology!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 10, 2013 @ 11:06 pm

  12. Love that you included the shots of the small streams running at your feet. The view does not always have to be vast and grand to be pleasing and appreciated to my eye. The orange hawkweed petals are interesting, amazing how every conceivable shape and color can probably be found in a bloom.

    Like

    Comment by Grampy — August 11, 2013 @ 12:42 am

    • I’m glad that you like these. Indeed there is a lot more to a wilderness hike than the vast scenes. I usually have over a hundred photos after a hike and most are not the landscapes.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 11, 2013 @ 8:22 pm

  13. I can see why you want to take another look, it’s utterly breathtaking. The flowers are beautiful too, I really like your shot of the fringed grass of Parnassus.

    Did you encounter any mammals on your trek?

    Like

    Comment by Finn — August 11, 2013 @ 3:00 am

    • I’m planning another trip into the CMW in a few more days. It’s a large area, 147 square miles.
      We didn’t encounter any on this hike, but we saw a beautiful elk and calf on the way to the trail head, and of course lots of deer. There were tracks on the trail and one big pile of bear scat; black bear, not Grizzly.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 11, 2013 @ 8:24 pm

  14. Great documentary of the trail, as always. I always love really dark forest photos.

    Like

    Comment by Candace — August 11, 2013 @ 3:01 pm

    • Thanks! I will continue to post more photos of the trails and flora on the following trips. I take plenty of photos, thinking that I may never get to travel that way again.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 11, 2013 @ 8:26 pm

  15. Not too disappointed? Looks like one of the best treks of the summer! Amazing views both in the distant and closeup. I really liked the photo of the Indian pipes! Wow!

    Like

    Comment by WildBill — August 12, 2013 @ 5:46 am

    • It was very enjoyable even though we didn’t get as far as I wanted to go. That’s OK though because I found anther way to get to the peak and will be able to look at this trail from above. I haven’t found an inch of that area that isn’t beautiful!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 12, 2013 @ 7:38 pm

  16. There is a delightful level of detail and light in your pictures.
    All the best,
    Camelia

    Like

    Comment by Camelia — August 12, 2013 @ 5:53 am

  17. Awesome images Terry especially the wildflowers, love the Bishops Cap !!

    Like

    Comment by Bernie Kasper — August 12, 2013 @ 7:33 am

    • Yes, the Bishop’s cap is an interesting little thing. I was surprised to see the variety of colors on it. It will be fun to explore that wilderness because it contains many types of plants that will be new to me. I’m looking forward to my next visit there, hopefully yet this week.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 12, 2013 @ 7:41 pm

  18. Thank You for presenting this walk. Your diverse photos praise the beauty of the nature. Great post.

    Like

    Comment by Sartenada — August 15, 2013 @ 11:10 pm

    • Thank you, Matti! There is indeed much beauty in the natural world!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 16, 2013 @ 10:18 pm


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