Montana Outdoors

November 7, 2011

Trail 368

Filed under: Autumn — montucky @ 10:58 pm

Trail 368

Trail 368

Trail 368

Trail 368

Photos were taken November 2, 2011 on the lower part of trail 368 to the Big Hole lookout in western Montana’s Cabinet Mountains.

Advertisements

44 Comments »

  1. i have heard of leaving a trail of bread crumbs, but a trail of snow? a little extreme, don’t ya think? =o)

    Like

    Comment by Sandy — November 7, 2011 @ 11:04 pm

    • In some places, they only have a few signs; here, a white carpet!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 8, 2011 @ 9:35 am

  2. Happy snow trails to you!

    Like

    Comment by Roberta — November 7, 2011 @ 11:25 pm

    • Very soon, Roberta. The snow is getting closer, lower on the mountains.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 8, 2011 @ 9:36 am

  3. Beautiful!

    Like

    Comment by Jo Woolf — November 8, 2011 @ 1:07 am

  4. Showing you the way 🙂

    Like

    Comment by TheDailyClick — November 8, 2011 @ 6:59 am

    • Add another 6 inches or so and it gets harder. These trails are pretty well marked with blazes though.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 8, 2011 @ 9:39 am

  5. Just what I needed this morning, a nice walk in the mountains. Crisp clean air and beautiful scenery. Now that’s the perfect way to start a work day. What is the red leafed shrub that lines the path?

    Like

    Comment by anniespickns — November 8, 2011 @ 7:00 am

    • Most of the the red leaves are huckleberry. The leaves have stayed on them for a long time this fall.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 8, 2011 @ 9:40 am

  6. Don’t know what traisl 367 of 369 look like but they couldn’t possibly be more pleasant and gorgeous. You sure do have some blue, blue skies in Montana!

    Like

    Comment by WildBill — November 8, 2011 @ 7:19 am

    • Now you got me started, Bill. Trail 369 is about 15 miles away in another mountain range, the Coeur d’Alenes. I can’t find 367 on my maps, but I’ll keep looking. 366 has been decommissioned (but I followed part of it a week ago), and perhaps 367 was too.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 8, 2011 @ 9:49 am

  7. Great shots! Love the bits of red here and there.

    Like

    Comment by Barbara — November 8, 2011 @ 11:14 am

    • The variety of colors this year is amazing. It makes up for a rather drab fall last year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 8, 2011 @ 8:37 pm

  8. Fall in Montana is a beautiful season – thanks for sharing.

    Like

    Comment by daveabirding — November 8, 2011 @ 12:19 pm

    • It is my wife’s favorite season, and I certainly love to colors and the cooler air.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 8, 2011 @ 8:38 pm

  9. Loved how God put out a white carpet for you to follow…much prettier than the red carpet at a fancy hotel any day! Beautiful photos, as usual. 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — November 8, 2011 @ 6:54 pm

  10. Hi Montucky, I really like seeing these trail photographs. I think the second-to-the-last one is especially nice. So vivid and pretty. Have an extra-nice Wednesday tomorrow!

    Like

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — November 8, 2011 @ 7:10 pm

    • I’m glad you like to see them wildlifewatcher. You have a great Wednesday too!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 8, 2011 @ 8:40 pm

  11. All those colors are just beautiful, all those photos look like paintings.

    Like

    Comment by Candace — November 8, 2011 @ 8:25 pm

    • They might inspire paintings. There are miles of trail like this. It’s very pleasant to hike them!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 8, 2011 @ 8:42 pm

  12. This trail deserves a spiffier name!

    Like

    Comment by Watching Seasons — November 8, 2011 @ 9:40 pm

    • It is called the Big Hole Lookout trail besides its number. I’ve just become accustomed to using the trail numbers because that is very specific and helps anyone who is interested to find the right trail. There are many trails named after the same place names, but the trail numbers are all unique.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 13, 2011 @ 1:36 am

  13. Decommissioned trails. I don’t know if that sounds like a bad thing or a good thing. Too few hikers out enjoying them, or returning to their more pristine origins. But, I think hiking the decommissioned trails would be emotionally rewarding. These are beautiful trail photos. The last photo speaks the loudest to me. Something about the openness….

    Like

    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — November 9, 2011 @ 6:56 am

    • Decommissioning a trail can be either good or bad, depending on the location. Nearly always, once it’s done though it will be the end of the trail. In a year or two trees down over the trail caused by storms or winter snow will block the trail and make impossible to use.

      A few weeks ago a friend and I tried to follow a decommissioned trail from its bottom end on up: we knew it’s location and route from an old forest map. I heard that the summer before last a fire crew had cleared it after working on a fire at the upper end of the trail: it was easier for them to saw the old trail out and come down the 5 miles than to climb way back up to where there was road access. We were able to use the trail for about two miles, then turned back because there were so many trees down over the trail it was impassable.

      Nearly all of the trails in our forests in this region were established in the early 1900’s for access to fire lookout sites so Forest Service workers could get to the lookouts and pack trains could supply them. Some have been lost and many are still being maintained for hikers, hunters and horsemen as well as for Forest service and wildlife service access. Use varies. If I hike several hundred miles of trail in a summer, I may encounter two or three people, although that low trail usage is probably because of the trails that I choose. I prefer to hike alone most of the time and go where it is very unlikely that I will encounter anyone else: there is an immense feeling of freedom when I’m on a high country trail and know that there is not another person within 10 or 15 miles of me, that I got there on foot, and my safety and well being depend completely on my knowledge and ability alone. Some trails are well advertised though and therefore fairly popular.

      I consider the remaining Forest Service trails, especially the old pack trails, to be historical and environmental treasures and grieve when one is lost.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 9, 2011 @ 9:52 am

  14. Wow what a spectacular place for a hike!

    Like

    Comment by dhphotosite — November 9, 2011 @ 10:10 am

    • This is one trail of many here like it. They are wonderful challenges for the traveler, but always worth the effort!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 9, 2011 @ 11:44 pm

  15. Won’t be long before you’ll have to trade your hiking boots for xc skis.

    Decommissioned trails are a drag. Sometimes they call them “man ways” but that’s a euphemism, because the deadfall makes them pretty impassible for man, if not beast.

    Like

    Comment by Kim — November 9, 2011 @ 6:45 pm

    • I would like to try XC skis this winter, but may just have to rely on snow shoes as usual.

      I’ve seen many old trails that have become impassible for man that had animal trails around the deadfalls. Sometimes those are useful, but the critters are much better at climbing very steep hillsides than we two-legged ones.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 9, 2011 @ 11:47 pm

  16. I’m partial to your lower trail shots… these are beautiful!

    Like

    Comment by kcjewel — November 9, 2011 @ 7:56 pm

    • I think you would enjoy this trail, Jewel, but not the part where it approaches the lookout.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 9, 2011 @ 11:48 pm

  17. I love those red grasses. Great contrast.

    Like

    Comment by Tammy — November 9, 2011 @ 9:09 pm

    • The red is mostly huckleberry, pretty in fall, and delicious in late summer.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 9, 2011 @ 11:49 pm

  18. A little touch of several colors makes nature stand out.

    Like

    Comment by Evangeline Art Photography — November 9, 2011 @ 10:11 pm

    • It sure does! It leads me to a great deal of speculation about why there is so much color.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 9, 2011 @ 11:52 pm

  19. Terry, We awoke to snow here in the Andes but summer is coming! Beautiful colors!

    Like

    Comment by Maureen — November 10, 2011 @ 5:17 am

    • I guess the snow there is on its way out and here it is on its way in.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 10, 2011 @ 10:26 pm

  20. Some absolutely beautiful pictures. I like the way the trail is marked by snow.

    Like

    Comment by Ratty — November 10, 2011 @ 4:34 pm

    • It appeared that the snow stayed on the trail because there were ice crystals on the tread of the trail that kept it cold. An interesting phenomenon.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 10, 2011 @ 10:27 pm

  21. Nice of nature to give you a white painted trail to follow. I guess that’s better than it being yellow, eh? Love that mountain blue sky!

    Like

    Comment by Scott Thomas Photography — November 11, 2011 @ 2:48 pm

    • The trail I was on today was solid yellow from the needles of the larch since they are now shedding. Tomorrow though, it will be white again, as will the sky.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — November 11, 2011 @ 11:18 pm

  22. Nice colors.

    Like

    Comment by apostolcornel — December 11, 2011 @ 11:10 am


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: