Montana Outdoors

October 24, 2018

The Larch at Weeksville Divide

Filed under: Autumn, Trees — Tags: , , , , — montucky @ 9:42 pm

Today I visited a large display of Western Larch that grows just to the north of the Weeksville Creek Divide at the headwaters of Todd Creek. The tall mountain in the background is the site of the photos in the two previous posts.

Larch at Todd creek

Larch at Todd Creek

Larch at Todd Creek

Larch at Todd Creek

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June 27, 2018

A short road trip

What started out this morning to be a little hike along the top of Weeksville Divide on a favorite trail, USFS trail 345, turned into a short road trip.

There weren’t any new wildflowers in bloom along the divide except this small Mountain Rose which is a small flower, not more than an inch or so across:

dwarf rose, wood rose

Dwarf rose, Mountain Rose ~ Rosa gymnocarpa

After about a mile on the trail I hiked back down to the Jeep and after about ten miles of driving north on the Weeksville Creek road paid a visit to a small stream that has long been a favorite place to catch a limit of small Brook Trout. I didn’t fish today but caught some pretty scenery instead.

Along Little Thompson River

Along Little Thompson River

Along Little Thompson River

You can see why, besides the good fishing, it’s one of my favorite summer places.

It was a pretty drive back home, the highlight of which was getting to see some wild Hollyhocks growing beside a small spring just above the water of Thompson River. It’s the only place I’ve ever found them. Not a bad morning at that!

Mountain Hollyhock

Mountain Hollyhock

Mountain Hollyhock ~ lliamna rivularis

October 7, 2017

Weeksville Creek Rainbow

Filed under: Autumn, Weeksville Creek — Tags: , , — montucky @ 4:11 pm

Weeksville Creek Rainbow

It often pays to go for a walk in the rain.

May 26, 2016

Bear Grass ~ Xerophyllum tenax

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , , , — montucky @ 9:19 am

Bear Grass

Bear Grass

Bear Grass

Bear Grass

Bear Grass

Bear-Grass is the only evergreen member of the lily family. Its flowering stems grow from off-shoot plants growing at the base of each “grassy” clump and appear at each plant every five to ten years. The flowers are large (approximately 3” X 4”), blooming at the tops of stalks that are around four and a half feet tall. The genus name comes from the Greek word xeros meaning “dry,” and phyllon meaning “leaf” and the species name tenax means “holding fast”, referring to the tough pliable leaves which were used by the indigenous people to make ornamental baskets. The plant is poisonous although some think that bears eat the fleshy leaf bases in the spring. I’ve never seen bears eat it, but I have seen grassy bases that have been severely disturbed in the spring. The plant is native to six of the far western states in the U.S. and the two western provinces of Canada and in this area usually likes elevations over about 5,000 feet.

You can find a wealth of information on them here .

January 5, 2016

Whatever it takes

Filed under: Weeksville Creek, Winter — Tags: , , — montucky @ 2:20 pm

RUSTI

My son had my Jeep so…

Weeksville Road

Beyond here there were 4 X 4 tracks, snowmobile tracks, deer tracks, elk tracks and one set of boot tracks.

Weeksville Road

Weeksville Road.

Snowy Firs

Snow on the firs.

Weeksville Creek

Weeksville Creek.

Snow shower from the trees

With the slightest breeze the trees were shedding snow.

The star of the show

The tiny Fir was the star of the show.

May 31, 2013

Another wild orchid; Mountain Lady’s Slipper

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , , — montucky @ 6:12 pm

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady’s Slipper, Cypripedium montanum

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