Montana Outdoors

April 15, 2017

Spring Wildflowers

Eddy Peak

Eddy Peak in the Cherry Peak Roadless Area photographed from the Munson Creek trail head.

One of my favorite days of Spring usually comes on April 18th and for years on that day I have hiked two miles up the Munson Creek trail to an area where there is a large area of Trilliums in bloom. This year it has been cool and rainy with few sunny days and I suspected that the trilliums would be late so today I checked at the footbridge near the trail head where they bloom earlier and found they are just beginning. My hike will be put off another week or so because my favorite area is two thousand feet higher in elevation.

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium, (trillium ovatum)

Several other wildflowers have begun to appear now too:

Yellow Bell

Yellow Bell, (fritillaria pudica)

Dark-throated Shooting Star

Dark-throated Shooting Star, (dodecatheon pulchellum)

Small-flowered Woodland Star

Small-flowered Woodland Star, (lithophragma parviflorum)

March 14, 2016

Bells and stars

In between rain showers and snow flurries both of these species bloomed today

Small-flowered Woodland Star

Yellow Bells

March 13, 2015

Woodland Star and friends

A few of the tiny wildflowers are beginning to emerge.

Small-flowered Woodland star

Small-flowered Woodland star ~ Lithophragma parviflorum (blossom size about 1/4 in – .64cm)

Spring Draba, Spring Whitlow-grass

Spring Draba, Spring Whitlow-grass ~ Draba Verna (blossom size 1/8 in – .32cm)

May 12, 2013

May wildflowers

After the late arrival of warm weather, the wildflowers in this part of Western Montana have been hurrying to catch up with spring. Here are more that have started blooming in May:

Miner's Lettuce

Miner’s Lettuce, Claytonia perfoliata

Unknown

Unknown

Western Blue Clematis

Western Blue Clematis, Clematis occidentalis

Heart-leaf Arnica

Heart-leaf Arnica , Arnica cordifolia

Fairy Slipper, Calypso Orchid

Fairy Slipper, Calypso Orchid , Calypso bulbosa

Falsebox, Mountain Boxwood, Oregon Boxwood

Falsebox, Mountain Boxwood, Oregon Boxwood, Paxistma myrsinites

Blue-eyed Mary

Blue-eyed Mary, Collinsia parviflora

Yellow Wood Violet

Yellow Wood Violet, Viola glabella

Arrow-leaved Balsamroot

Arrow-leaved Balsamroot, Balsamorhiza sagittata

Arrow-leaved Balsamroot

Arrow-leaved Balsamroot, Balsamorhiza sagittata

Serviceberry, Saskatoon

Serviceberry, Saskatoon, Amelanchier alnifolia

antelope bitterbrush, antelope-brush

Antelope Bitterbrush, Antelope-brush, Purshia tridentata

antelope bitterbrush, antelope-brush

Antelope Bitterbrush, Antelope-brush, Purshia tridentata

sticky purple geranium, sticky geranium

Sticky Purple Geranium, Sticky Geranium, Geranium viscosissimum

woolly groundsel

Woolly Groundsel, Packera cana

ground ivy

Ground Ivy, Glechoma hederacea

largeflower triteleia

Largeflower Triteleia, Triteleia grandiflora

meadow death camas, common death camas

Meadow Death Camas, Common Death Camas, Zigadenus venenosus

small-flowered woodland-star, small-flowered prairie-star

Small-flowered Woodland-star, Small-flowered Prairie-star, Lithophragma parviflorum

holly-leaf Oregon-grape, shining Oregongrape, tall Oregongrape

Holly-leaf Oregon-grape, Shining Oregongrape, Tall Oregongrape, Berberis aquifolium

Unknown shrub

Unknown shrub

woolly groundsel

Common Hawkweed, Hieracium lachenalii

two-lobe larkspur, upland larkspur

Two-lobe Larkspur, Upland Larkspur, Delphinium nuttallianum

March 25, 2012

Small-flowered Woodland Star

After a week of snow and rain, the sky cleared a little today and I was surprised to see that the first Woodland Stars of the season are in bloom. The plants are small (only about two inches tall), but the blossoms are as pretty as always.

Woodland star

Woodland star

Woodland star

Sagebrush Buttercups have also spread out the range of their bloom .

Sagebrush buttercup

April 5, 2011

“stone wall” flowers

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 8:11 pm

Small-flowered Woodland Star

Small-flowered Woodland Star

Small-flowered Woodland Star ~ Lithophragma parviflorum ~ Saxifrage family

The genus name of this flower comes from the Greek lithos, ‘a stone’, and phragma, ‘a wall’, referring to the habitat of some species and I have indeed found them growing right against the rock on cliff walls.

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