Montana Outdoors

July 27, 2012

Pear Lake, Blossom Lakes ~ Evan’s Gulch Roadless Area (3)

Flowers of the Evan’s Gulch Roadless Area

For a short time I thought about posting photos of all of the wildflowers I encountered on the trail to Pear Lake, but upon counting them and finding that there were 35 different species, I decided instead to just post two sets, leaving out many whose photos I have posted before including Glacier Lilies and Springbeauties which bloomed at the lower elevations months ago but are now in full bloom among the snowbanks that remain on the high ridge just before the trail drops down to Pear Lake.

Harebells, Bluebells of Scotland, Campanula rotundifolia

Harebells, Bluebells of Scotland, Campanula rotundifolia

Clustered Thistle, Cirsium brevistylum

Clustered Thistle, Cirsium brevistylum

Poison Hemlock, Conium maculatum

Poison Hemlock, Conium maculatum

Pearly Everlasting, Anaphalis margaritacea

Pearly Everlasting, Anaphalis margaritacea

Pipsissewa, Prince's Pine, Chimaphila umbellata

Pipsissewa, Prince's Pine, Chimaphila umbellata

Pipsissewa, Prince’s Pine, Chimaphila umbellata

Ocean Spray, Holodiscus discolor

Ocean Spray, Holodiscus discolor (These are blossoming shrubs and their large clusters of blooms decorate many hillsides this time of summer)

One-leaved Foamflower, Tiarella unifoliata

One-leaved Foamflower, Tiarella unifoliata

Pink Wintergreen, Pyrola asarifolia

Pink Wintergreen, Pyrola asarifolia

August 30, 2011

Pipsissewa

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , — montucky @ 10:21 pm

All summer I looked forward to seeing this little shrub and was disappointed, thinking that I had missed it this year, but today on the west slope of Mount Baldy under the sub-alpine firs many were in bloom. I enjoy photographing it and especially enjoy displaying the photos, for you see, its pretty little face is almost always facing down toward the ground causing it to be overlooked. This one was growing on a very steep slope and I was able to slither up from below and get this view without disturbing the plant at all.

Pipsissewa, Common Prince's-pine

Pipsissewa, Prince’s-pine ~ Chimaphila umbellata

July 9, 2009

Would a Pipsissewa by any other name still smell as sweet?

On July 6, on a walk along the upper part of Buffalo Bill Creek I took this photo, thinking, well, I don’t know exactly what I was thinking.

Pipsissewa

Then on the following evening while hiking on a favorite trail that meanders along the Loneman Divide I saw another member of the same species in bloom and realized what I had been thinking the night before. They are very small (the blossoms stand only about 3 inches high) and they always look right at the ground and so photographing them is difficult because it involves getting dirt up your nose and being pricked by wild rose thorns in places that really shouldn’t be mentioned in polite company. However, despite those minor inconveniences along with the additional inconvenience that the sun had just set and another potential inconvenience that a big old bear had recently torn apart a log about 10 feet away looking for grubs, I gave it my best shot.

Pipsissewa

Pipsissewa

I am personally indebted to the Cree Indians because I just love the name “Pipsissewa” and it comes from their word “Pipisisikwea”! It’s also known by the name “Prince’s-pine”, although I have absolutely no idea why that is, and the scientific name Chimophila umbellata.

Blog at WordPress.com.