Montana Outdoors

June 29, 2018

Haying time

Filed under: Summer — Tags: , , — montucky @ 12:25 pm

Haying time

Clark Fork River Valley, western Montana

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34 Comments »

  1. There’s that big blue Montana sky again! Another beautiful capture, Terry!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — June 29, 2018 @ 1:19 pm

    • Thanks Donna. When the sky is that blue and is mixed with big white clouds, it does get noticed.

      Liked by 2 people

      Comment by montucky — June 29, 2018 @ 4:51 pm

  2. That’s quite a hay field. I’m so glad I’m not the one throwing the bales up on the wagon. I used to be able to do it all day but now, I doubt it.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 29, 2018 @ 2:56 pm

  3. 1st or second cut ?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Washe Koda — June 29, 2018 @ 4:35 pm

  4. Baldy in the background? Ron

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Ron — June 29, 2018 @ 7:31 pm

  5. We rarely see square or rectangular bales around here any more. The larger, round bales are more common. I’m sure there’s an explanation–or perhaps more than one explanation: differently sized fields, different hays, and so on. What’s certain is that no one’s going to be heaving round bales anywhere unless there’s some machinery involved. I very vaguely remember haystacks when I was a kid, and hay mows that were filled with loose hay that was pitched down with (of course) a pitchfork.

    Nash prairie, one of my favorites that I often visit, was a hayfield. The land never has been broken: only cut twice a year. I ran into a land manager a couple of months ago who told me another site I’ve been visiting is cut for hay — and some of the fields around the Johnson Space Center have wonderful hay, that used to go to the bison at one of our nature centers.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — June 29, 2018 @ 7:32 pm

    • There’s a lot of hay grown around here on big ranches and small.
      When I was a kid I helped with the haying on my grand parents’ ranch. Balers were just being developed and we didn’t have one so we mowed it, raked it and pitched it onto a hay wagon. When I was about 8 I rode the hay rake and tripped it at the right time to make rows. When the raking was done I got to drive the tractor pulling the hay wagon while the men pitched the hay up. Later I got to do the harder stuff!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 29, 2018 @ 8:45 pm

  6. So interesting seeing the valley and hay crops compared to the mountains and rivers in your usual photos. Reminds me of summer school holidays on my Grandmother’s farm.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — June 29, 2018 @ 7:34 pm

    • It’s just that I don’t take many pictures of the valley. My heart is in the mountains.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 29, 2018 @ 8:51 pm

  7. Wonderful. I think Montana is one of the most beautiful states (if not THE most beautiful).

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 30, 2018 @ 8:27 am

  8. I’ve only been gone a few weeks but I can’t wait to come back. I can almost smell that hay.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by jimsturjimstur — June 30, 2018 @ 9:37 am

  9. Ahh the big sky!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by dhphotosite — June 30, 2018 @ 11:41 am

    • Sure seems big, doesn’t it! Good place for anyone who loves clouds too.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 30, 2018 @ 12:31 pm

  10. I still recall the days in summer at the Munson Ranch haying times. There was loose hay and later bales in that big ole barn. We played in the barn a lot back then. I like all of your photos you post. Mountains are my favorite and of course the many beautiful wild flowers. I can still see the lights on up in the Eddy lookout when I was a kid. Huge thanks for your postings.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Frances Schenck — June 30, 2018 @ 3:42 pm

    • Hello Frances! I remember the days when hay was put up loose too. Did you know of the Hicks ranch here in the Plains area? That was my grand parents ranch and I helped with the haying when I was growing up and often slept in the hay barn on top of the hay. I will never forget those experiences! I’ll have to remember to look for the lights in the Eddy lookout. I think it is still being manned during fire season and maybe the lookout will have a light on. Good to hear from you! I’m glad that you like seeing the photos! You made my day!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 30, 2018 @ 8:05 pm

  11. That’s neat, I was hoping to photograph some hay bales when I was in Indiana but didn’t see any.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — June 30, 2018 @ 5:35 pm

    • I love seeing the hay bales in the fields (as long as I don’t have to move them). One of the signs of summer and its bounty.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 30, 2018 @ 8:07 pm

  12. Very interesting. Do You have those big white hay packages for winter? In Finland, we call them: โ€dragon eggs”.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — July 3, 2018 @ 2:18 am

    • No, I don’t think we do. These will all be stacked either in a hay barn or sometimes just stacked together.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 3, 2018 @ 6:03 pm

  13. What a sky … lovely image. I bet that hay smells divine ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — July 4, 2018 @ 1:15 pm

  14. Very nice. Love the scenery!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Reed Andariese — July 5, 2018 @ 4:17 pm

    • The mountain in the background center looks small but it is 5,000 feet higher than the valley.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — July 5, 2018 @ 4:51 pm


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