Montana Outdoors

June 26, 2018

Catching up ~ 1

I have been trying to post photos of the various wildflower species found in this region this spring but I’ve gotten behind. This will be the first of three posts of the species I didn’t mean to ignore. Each is unique and pretty in its own right.

Feathery false lily-of-the-valley, Plumed solomon's seal

Feathery false lily-of-the-valley, Plumed solomon's seal

Feathery false lily-of-the-valley, Plumed solomon’s seal ~ maianthemum racemosum

Tall Western Groundsell

Tall Western Groundsell ~ senecio integerrimus

Starry false lily-of-the-valley, Star-flowered solomon's-seal

Starry false lily-of-the-valley, Star-flowered solomon’s-seal ~ maianthemum stellatum

Lemon Weed, Western Gromwell

Lemon Weed, Western Gromwell ~ lithospermum ruderale

Prickly Currant

Prickly Currant ~ ribes lacustre

Field Chickweed

Field Chickweed ~ cerastium arvense

Alaska Saxifrage

Alaska Saxifrage ~ saxifraga ferruginea

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29 Comments »

  1. I thought, when I saw the first one, “That looks like lily of the valley, but not.” I don’t think I’ve seen that one here (the false one), but I haven’t been out looking for it either. Very pretty little flowers. I know chickweed! Very prolific in my garden where I don’t want it.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 26, 2018 @ 11:01 am

    • I’ve never quite figured out the whole stories of Lily of the valley and its suburbs and imposters. In the local area I see chickweed in various locations, but no infestations and a rather sparse population. The least common in this group is the saxifrage. They’re pretty but I’ve found them in only a couple locations.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2018 @ 11:43 am

  2. How can you know their name? Amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Dana S. Hugh — June 26, 2018 @ 1:15 pm

    • I’ve spent a lot of time identifying the flower I find. I use a book that pretty much covers this region and a half dozen websites. I always try to include the names so if someone who has a special interest in one of them will find it easier to do more research on it.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2018 @ 4:42 pm

  3. Such little beauties that my eyes have not seen in real life..

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mother Hen — June 26, 2018 @ 1:25 pm

  4. All of them wildflowers are small masterpieces. You are forgiven and not the only one fallen behind 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Hanna — June 26, 2018 @ 2:34 pm

    • Summer causes that, doesn’t it. There is so much to do in this season, especially in places where the summer is short and the winter severe.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2018 @ 4:45 pm

  5. There are all beautiful. I’ve seen the star-flowered Solomon’s-seal just once here.
    I love the lemon weed and the prickly currant. I’ve never heard of either one.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 26, 2018 @ 2:56 pm

    • All of these are fairly common here, especially along the trails, except the saxifrage. We have several species but they are not all that populated. One species I found only at the base of a fire lookout cabin at about 6,900 feet.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2018 @ 4:49 pm

  6. A lovely series and well captured. Love those little orange pops of colour on the white Saxifrage flower. Such a wide variety of wildflowers in Montana!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — June 26, 2018 @ 6:01 pm

    • Thanks Vicki. Yes, the variety is incredible, and I’m sure I haven’t seen them all.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2018 @ 6:45 pm

  7. You do a spectacular job on your photographs! I am in awe and always wondering if you also Photoshop or if they are the originals.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Anonymous — June 27, 2018 @ 10:54 am

    • Thank you! I don’t have Photoshop, but I often do make small adjustments using the photo edition tool that comes with the MAC OSX. I nearly always underexpose my photos to avoid inadvertently overexposing the light area (if they are overexposed they are lost), and then brighten them a bit if they need it. I am not happy with a photo unless it looks exactly as I remember seeing it.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2018 @ 2:36 pm

  8. The saxifrage is so pretty — as are they all. Is the lemonweed truly that lovely, lemon-chiffon-pie color? I don’t think I’ve ever seen a flower in just that shade of yellow, and it’s beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — June 27, 2018 @ 8:20 pm

  9. Wildflowers are like snowflakes, there are so many gorgeous species, and no two are exactly alike. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — June 29, 2018 @ 11:54 am

    • They are indeed, and there are different species in different places. There seems to be no end to them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 29, 2018 @ 12:13 pm

  10. I just love your wild flowers … so delicate. How wonderful to learn their names

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — July 1, 2018 @ 1:51 pm

  11. They all are beautiful, but I love very much the first photo.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — July 3, 2018 @ 2:25 am


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