Montana Outdoors

June 13, 2018

Revett Lake Part 1 ~ The trail

Now that at least most of the snow is gone from the higher terrain in this neck of the woods, hiking into the back country is becoming possible. Early this morning I headed out on a hike up to Revett Lake, a cirque lake situated on the Idaho side of the Montana/Idaho border in the Pan Handle National Forest, not knowing for sure if the snow had melted down enough to make the trail passable. I was pleased to see that it had, although still for about a quarter of the way I walked on tightly packed snow banks.

While the temperature in the northwestern Montana valleys approached 80º today, when I parked the Jeep at the trail head (at around 5,000 feet elevation), the temperature was in the upper 30’s. It was a beautiful day for hiking, with a pleasant breeze and scattered clouds drifting across a deep blue sky and so (guess what?): I took a lot of pictures.

For something a little different I decided to display my account of the trip in two posts, the first being just the trail itself and the second just of the lake. These photos are in the order in which I took them as I hiked the trail, and for those who are not familiar with hiking in the high back country I hope it will give some perspective about what its like as it goes up at the start, then down to a crossing over the stream that issues from the lake, and back up to the lake; for those who regularly hike such trails it can be a sample of the scenery along this one.

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

"Revett

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

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38 Comments »

  1. Thanks. Looks like really nice country

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tony Brainerd — June 13, 2018 @ 7:34 pm

    • It’s a beautiful piece of Idaho’s back country.. I try to get up there every spring.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 13, 2018 @ 8:17 pm

  2. Thanks for sharing–in some ways it remains me of northern New England, and yet there are many differences.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by lmachayes — June 13, 2018 @ 7:35 pm

    • This is in the Coeur d’Alene Mountain Range, and although it isn’t really high elevation (between 5,000 and 6,000 feet) the trees here are ones normally found at higher elevations.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 13, 2018 @ 8:34 pm

  3. A beautiful hike!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 13, 2018 @ 7:38 pm

    • It is, and a fairly gentle one for this region. Good place to start getting used to the higher elevations.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 13, 2018 @ 8:35 pm

  4. I can feel the crisp mountain air rushing into my lungs! Did you come across any wildlife in this beautiful place?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by de Wets Wild — June 13, 2018 @ 7:39 pm

    • That air was crisp this morning! I didn’t see any wildlife, probably because I was a little late getting up there, but there were deer tracks in mine when I made the return. This general area is one of the few remaining areas where Canadian Lynx are present. One year in early spring I hiked the mile from the highway to the trail head with snow shoes, following two sets of their tracks on top of about 6 feet of snow. I keep hoping I will get to see one.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 13, 2018 @ 8:39 pm

      • We’ll hold thumbs with you that your path will cross that of a Canadian Lynx at some point – seeing one of those beautiful animals in real life would be such a thrill!

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by de Wets Wild — June 14, 2018 @ 12:29 am

  5. Beautifully unspoiled country.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candice — June 13, 2018 @ 10:33 pm

  6. Wonderful, and thanks for posting more of the hike. Just like walking along with you, but with those steep hillsides, glad to see an actual path to follow. I’d hate to be walking up those hills with all those loose stones and rubble. I’ll bet it would be nice and cool on a hot day with all that shade.

    (Actually with those steep mountain sides, it reminded me of walking up to the top of Mt Vesuvius in Italy in 1976. Very, very steep and the cable car was broken down the day we visited. I still have the tiny piece of volcanic rock from the edge at the top to remind me of the experience).

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — June 13, 2018 @ 11:50 pm

    • It would be hardly possible to see that area were it not for the trail. It would be very hard going. I often hike the trails to the sites of old fire lookouts which are always on peaks, and I have brought back a small rock from each as a solid reminder of the places.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 14, 2018 @ 7:28 am

  7. Wow! You certainly live in a beautiful part of the country! And you do a wonderful job of documenting it for others to see and enjoy! I always enjoy “seeing” it through your wonderful images.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Reed Andariese — June 14, 2018 @ 12:24 am

    • Thanks Reed. Yes, the higher mountain areas are beautiful ad unspoiled. It’s good to have those old trail as access for anyone who wants tp put in some effort to get there. The ruggedness of those areas serve to protect them from exploitation too. I’m glad that you enjoy seeing them. I started taking a camera with me on trips like that many ears ago so I could show my wife (who was physically unable to join me) what I saw and she always looked forward to seeing the pictures I brought back.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 14, 2018 @ 7:37 am

  8. Beautiful! That’s some temperature difference. It looks so cool and refreshing up there. I look forward to seeing pics of the lake.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — June 14, 2018 @ 1:16 am

    • The temperature differences always have to be considered and prepared for. Avoiding hypothermia should always be a consideration even in mid summer because in the higher places there can be a complete change in season between valley and mountaintop. Summer comes late in the high country and winter starts early.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 14, 2018 @ 7:42 am

  9. What a great area to hike, love the trillium!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by centralohionature — June 14, 2018 @ 3:49 am

    • Here we are blessed with hundreds of such places. Trilliums bloom here at lower elevations in early to mid April, while up there they are in full bloom now. Glacier Lilies which were at peak bloom down at the beginning of May are just starting to bloom up there right now. It was like revisiting early spring.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 14, 2018 @ 7:47 am

  10. My, my, the scenery looks familiar — think I’ve been there with you. Thanks for posting such fine photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Anonymous — June 14, 2018 @ 7:48 am

    • Yes we went up there (if memory serves, which it often doesn’t) in September of 2014. We wanted to get to the lake early in the morning before the wind came up so the lake surface would be smooth, but found it was windy anyway. It was the same yesterday.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 14, 2018 @ 7:59 am

  11. What a wonderful walk in a beautiful landscape. That’s my kind of weather 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Hanna — June 14, 2018 @ 11:50 am

    • I think you would have enjoyed that walk too, Hanna. I think that would be your kind of place too.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 14, 2018 @ 6:50 pm

  12. That’s some scenery! I like how the evergreens grow so straight and narrow there. Ours are much wider and tend to sprawl out in all directions.
    I’m surprised there is still so much snow, but the trillium doesn’t seem to mind.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 14, 2018 @ 4:08 pm

    • The season up there now is early spring. Summer comes late in the high country and winter comes early. That trillium is now at the stage where it would have been in mid April had it been born at a lower elevation. Those tall, thin evergreens with the pointed tops are Subalpine Firs (abies lasiocarpa). Their crowns are designed to easily shed the heavy snow and ice that are present in winter at the higher elevations where they live; perfectly adapted to their habitat.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 14, 2018 @ 6:59 pm

  13. I saw Part 2 first, and enjoyed seeing this magnificent lake and trail in two parts. It’s always a question in the northern latitudes at this time of year in the mountains whether one can get through or not, glad you were able to, montucky. Fantastic trails and vistas, vigorous hiking, and wonderful to see it in the shoulder season with snow and wildflowers too. The trillium is a treat.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jet Eliot — June 15, 2018 @ 12:56 pm

    • Glad that you enjoyed seeing the trail and the lake! I prepare for about everything on a high country hike and my pack always weighs a few more pounds than I would like, but that’s the way it is. I love the weather variances as long as I’m prepared. Many times in summer I’ve left the trail head wearing just a t-shirt and up a couple thousand feet ended up wearing several more layers and hiking on a couple inches of new snow. That’s always a great hike!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 15, 2018 @ 5:20 pm

  14. I enjoyed part I and II and I’m not sure which I liked more, the trail getting there or the destination! Either way they are both beautiful and shows some wonderful country. I think I’m leaning towards part I though. Ron

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Anonymous — June 15, 2018 @ 4:29 pm

    • You would have enjoyed the day up there Ron. I enjoyed just being there, all the way.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 15, 2018 @ 5:22 pm

  15. “Mountain” is a relative term, that’s for sure. The elevation of Rich Mountain, in Arkansas’s Ouachitas, is 2,680 — about half of what you show here. There’s no snow in Arkansas, either, and I really enjoyed seeing it here. I thought it was interesting that both flowers you showed are white, like the snow. I noticed your reference to a “second spring,” too. Just as you can go up in elevation and find flowers that have finished blooming down below, I found the same thing by driving north. Many flowers that are long gone in my part of Texas were just coming into bud and bloom in Missouri. That’s one reason I think spring and fall travel are so interesting — you can track the changes.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — June 15, 2018 @ 9:44 pm

    • It has been fascinating to see the similarities and differences that you have noticed in your travels. Wildflowers seem to be very adaptable, but the constants seem to be the climate/temperature conditions in each place, south to north and low to high elevation. You have had an enlightening trip!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 15, 2018 @ 10:16 pm

  16. Looks like a wonderful hike. Thanks for taking us along with you. Enduring a hot and humid couple of days here now after getting back from our vacation up north (Vermont, New Hampshire & Maine), your photos were refreshing for me!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — June 18, 2018 @ 8:39 am

    • Kind of rough, leaving a cool area to return to heat and humidity! The hike was refreshing, even for here.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 18, 2018 @ 8:44 am

  17. It is so beautiful! How you must enjoy the hike. The smells of the forest and the fresh air must be wonderful .. lovely post

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — June 18, 2018 @ 1:13 pm

    • Thanks Julie. Hikes like that are my favorite things to do. Actually, this one was very short and not too high, but OK for a start to the summer hiking season. I hope to do a couple dozen more before the snow closes the trails again. I wish I could take those who are interested with me on a hike or two so they could get the rest of the feel of it.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 18, 2018 @ 9:03 pm

  18. I am speechless. So beautiful nature, landscapes and wonderful paths to walk.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — June 19, 2018 @ 12:55 am

    • That is one of the more scenic trails because there are many openings through the trees. It’s a very pleasant hike!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2018 @ 7:14 pm


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