Montana Outdoors

June 5, 2018

Wood’s rose

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 10:20 am

Wood's rose

Wood’s rose ~ rosa woodsii

It is very difficult (at least for me) to determine the exact species of the wild roses because there are several and the differences are very slight, but I think believe is rosa woodsii. It is growing at the border of a dense thicket of Black Hawthorn in a very large, open prairie.

20 Comments »

  1. Lovely, ah the fragrance of a wild rose!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by centralohionature — June 5, 2018 @ 10:23 am

  2. Nature is wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 5, 2018 @ 10:25 am

  3. You have prairies in your mountains?! I don’t think I’d care what the rose looked like as long as it had that wonderful fragrance!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by pat — June 5, 2018 @ 11:02 am

    • Our weather here comes from the southwest. At the Idaho border (about 50 miles away) the clouds drop precipitation on the huge Bitterroot mountain range. Next they blow over the southern end of the Coeur d’Alenes before they reach the Clark Fork River valley in which I live. Next they cross the Cabinet Mountains and by that time there is little moisture left as they cross the area known as Camas prairie before they see the Mission valley and then reach the tall Mission Range. Camas Prairie isn’t very large, but it’s one of the driest regions in Montana.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 5, 2018 @ 11:48 am

      • Ah, yes, I believe that’s what they call a rain shadow. I learned that term spending time in Death Valley. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by pat — June 5, 2018 @ 12:43 pm

  4. So pretty! We’re a little short on native roses here in Texas, but I was lucky to find a prairie filled with them in Missouri — nice pink ones, like this. Identifying species is hard, but I broke down and bought a couple of flower and grass ID books for Kansas and Missouri, so I may be able to at least find a couple of options.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — June 5, 2018 @ 1:35 pm

    • Luckily, here the Burke Museum website from the University of Washington covers most of this area as well as Washington state and it’s helpful, but I’m, still often puzzled about which is which.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 5, 2018 @ 7:48 pm

  5. I agree, roses can be tough to identify but this one’s beautiful no matter what its name.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 5, 2018 @ 2:58 pm

    • It is. I’m more concerned with the beauty of the flowers, in most cases, than their Id’s.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 5, 2018 @ 7:50 pm

  6. I’ve said it before, but your flower photos really are breathtaking!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by de Wets Wild — June 5, 2018 @ 8:09 pm

    • Thanks! Finding and photographing the wildflowers has become a passion. They are so pretty and I want to make their photos available to those who like wildflowers but can’t always see them growing.

      Liked by 2 people

      Comment by montucky — June 5, 2018 @ 8:13 pm

  7. This is very beautiful indeed…and a nice flower to come across in the wild!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by dhphotosite — June 6, 2018 @ 6:59 am

    • Seeing it in the open prairie was a pleasant surprise. Actually, it was on the edge of a large thicket of Black Hawthorn with miles of grass all around.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 6, 2018 @ 7:04 am

  8. Nice. I love wild roses. Pretty color.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — June 8, 2018 @ 8:48 am

    • There are about half a dozen species here and I have difficulty telling them apart.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 8, 2018 @ 3:47 pm

  9. So very delicate .. but so pretty

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — June 10, 2018 @ 12:49 am


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