Montana Outdoors

June 1, 2018

Prairie Smoke

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , — montucky @ 9:45 am

Prairie Smoke aka Old Man's Whiskers

Prairie Smoke AKA Old Man's Whiskers

Prairie Smoke aka Old Man's Whiskers

Prairie Smoke aka Old Man's Whiskers

Prairie Smoke, Old Man’s whiskers ~ Geum triflorum

These are also sometimes called “Purple Avens” or “Old Man’s Whiskers”. The species name triflorum (three-flowered) comes from their usual cluster of three flowers. When they grow in groups, the “feathery” appearance of the fruits gives an impression of low-lying smoke.

28 Comments »

  1. How pretty and delicate. How big are they? I can see why it’s nicknamed Old Man’s Whiskers.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candice — June 1, 2018 @ 10:45 am

    • The buds are about a half inch across, so they’re small, but fairly easy to find because they prefer to grow in the open.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 1, 2018 @ 12:48 pm

  2. That’s an interesting flower, and probably one I’ll never meet in person.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 1, 2018 @ 3:06 pm

  3. One of my favorites!! Ironically, the only times I have seen prairie smoke are in former burn areas. Such odd little flowers.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Laura Elizabeth — June 1, 2018 @ 5:09 pm

    • Interesting. I haven’t noticed them especially in burned areas. I’ll remember to watch for that.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 1, 2018 @ 8:36 pm

  4. What an amazing variety of wildflowers you have there! Beautiful ones too.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 1, 2018 @ 8:07 pm

    • I didn’t realize the number of different species until I began to photograph and research them, and I’m sure there are many that I haven’t discovered for myself too. To find wildflower species you have to be in the right place at the right time and here where my wanderings also incorporate altitudes from 2,400 feet to 7,400 feet and many species are elevation sensitive, it’s easy to realize that I could be missing a lot of them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 1, 2018 @ 8:45 pm

  5. This is so beautiful. I’m fond of fuzzy and furry flowers anyway — this is one I’d love to see, The color is special, too.. It reminds me of Clematis drummondii, or old man’s beard.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — June 1, 2018 @ 8:18 pm

    • It’s a gentle little flower and it reminds me of the clematis too. It’s in the rose family though and clematis is in the buttercup family. (And I’m not enough of a botanist to understand the difference.)

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 1, 2018 @ 8:34 pm

  6. Gorgeously striking!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — June 3, 2018 @ 5:06 am

  7. What a beauty. That’s one unusual flower I’d like to have around my area 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — June 3, 2018 @ 5:50 pm

    • They are sure different, and they like full sun on a dry, open hillside. You see them in colonies spread far apart. For some reason they only appear in certailn places.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2018 @ 6:29 pm

  8. Very interesting. Seems to differ from many flowers. When seeing it, I thought that I have seen similar in Finland, but wikipedia said – not.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — June 5, 2018 @ 12:28 am

    • Yes, they are quite different from most flowers, but I find them to be very pretty.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 5, 2018 @ 8:12 am

  9. Aptly named prairie Smoke … 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — June 6, 2018 @ 1:31 am

    • The name makes a lot of sense when you see a whole bunch of them in one area. It does look like puffs of smoke on the ground.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 6, 2018 @ 7:02 am

  10. Those are gorgeous and that color is so beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — June 8, 2018 @ 7:24 pm

  11. Very Nice! Wish I could remember all the names of Wildflowers!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Reed Andariese — June 9, 2018 @ 6:58 pm

    • I wish I could too, but there are so many of them. I have identified over 200 species in the small area through which I roam. I’m actually surprised at how many names I do remember from year to year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 9, 2018 @ 8:41 pm


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