Montana Outdoors

May 31, 2018

Unidentified

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: — montucky @ 6:13 pm

Yellow Paintbrush - immature?

Yellow Paintbrush - immature?

Yellow Paintbrush - immature?<

Yellow Paintbush - immature?

Yellow Paintbrush - immature?

This little plant defies my ability to identify it. It is growing in an area where Yellow Paintbrush (Castilleja lutescens) are plentiful and the leaves and fine hairs seem similar to those on the paints. Could it be that these are an immature stage of the Yellow Paintbrush, or it is an entirely different plant? If anyone knows its identity, I would sure like to know.

32 Comments »

  1. Cannot help with ID, but they sure are beautiful….

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jet Eliot — May 31, 2018 @ 6:19 pm

  2. Despite lack of name, its lovely fine hair-like structure and water droplets make for a lovely series of images. Sooooo pretty πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — May 31, 2018 @ 6:30 pm

  3. The leaf tips really are similar. I suppose you could wait for it to mature and then you’ll know. And of course you’ll have to let us know what you find out.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 31, 2018 @ 6:44 pm

  4. I had a look online, my guess is it’s an immature annual white paintbrush. http://science.halleyhosting.com/nature/basin/5petal/figwort/owl/hairy.htm

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Val — May 31, 2018 @ 7:50 pm

    • Thanks Val! That’s clearly a possibility because its range does extend into Idaho. Probably more likely that an immature Yellow Paintbrush. I have never seen one here though, or at least one in mature bloom. I’ll try to make a followup visit to where these are located although that won’t be easy. If it is a tenuis I’d love to see the flower.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 31, 2018 @ 8:35 pm

  5. I’m not at home and don’t have access to my photo files until I get there, but I have a couple of bud photos of two paintbrush species that certainly resemble this — at least in memory. I’ve made a note to check and see if there is a similarity. Those red tips on the bracts, and the sharp points, certainly sugggest paintbrush.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 31, 2018 @ 8:33 pm

    • I will be interested in what you may be able to find. What seems like the fairly simple solution of revisiting the plants a little later to see it in bloom is complicated because I found these during a 5 hour random wander through several hundred acres of steep, open southeast facing hillside, literally packed with low-growing plants, and ranging in elevation from 3,000 to 3,600 feet. Yellow paintbrush was plentiful, but no other paintbrush species was in evidence, which by itself is unusual.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 31, 2018 @ 8:54 pm

  6. You really did yours to have an answer to your question but –
    Very delicate and outstanding details!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Hanna — June 1, 2018 @ 12:58 pm

    • Perhaps I can find out what it is yet this season. I think they are very pretty even at this stage.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 1, 2018 @ 3:39 pm

      • I think you will. It is my impression that you find the name of all the flowers you see on your way.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Hanna — June 1, 2018 @ 3:50 pm

        • I always do my best. I’ve found that quite a few people find the photos useful when they research a species for information and distribution and I want to be accurate. I have found over two hundred different wildflower species in the area through which I usually roam and it’s a small area of only about 2,000 square miles. The state in which I live has 147,000 square miles and so I have covered only a little part of it.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — June 1, 2018 @ 3:57 pm

  7. What an interesting mystery – but great photos should you ever identify it!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Margy — June 1, 2018 @ 8:03 pm

    • It’s rather nice to have a few of those little mysteries hanging around, and a good reason to visit certain places at different times. I have several favorite trails quite close to home that I visit several times each summer and on each visit I find flowers in bloom that were not in bloom on my previous visit.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 1, 2018 @ 8:55 pm

  8. How pretty, the water droplets on it look like diamonds in the rough…..if they only were!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — June 3, 2018 @ 4:57 am

    • I don’t know if those drops are from dew (or more likely from the process of guttation, because the surrounding foliage wasn’t wet), but they sure were pretty.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2018 @ 8:25 am

  9. Amazing! Never seen anything like this flower.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — June 5, 2018 @ 12:30 am

    • This was the first like it that I’ve seen. Not sure just what it is.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 5, 2018 @ 8:13 am

  10. What an interesting and unique little thing. I have no idea what it is but I like it’s fuzzy appearance.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — June 5, 2018 @ 6:24 am

    • There are quite a few plants/flowers that have those kind of hairs, but this one exceeds most.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 5, 2018 @ 8:14 am

  11. I wish I knew its identity .. it is quite lovely. Wonderful images too πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — June 6, 2018 @ 1:27 am

  12. Very compelling, whatever they are…and I like the water droplets, too…what a beautiful natural finish!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by seekraz — June 8, 2018 @ 8:04 pm


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