Montana Outdoors

May 27, 2018

Mountain Lady’s Slippers

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , — montucky @ 8:20 pm

Seldom do I go out looking for a particular flower, but after an outing yesterday it occurred to me that the Lady’s Slippers should be starting to bloom and so today I drove to a place where I usually see them and, happily, they are in peak bloom. I’m glad that I didn’t miss it! They are one of the prettiest of the wild orchids native to this region.

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady's Slipper

Mountain Lady’s Slipper ~ cypripedium montanum

19 Comments »

  1. They really are beautiful and have such a complicated design. Worth going out on a special trip to find them. Wonderfully sharp and clear photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 27, 2018 @ 8:25 pm

    • Thanks Anneli! I thought it was worth the trip, and a very short trip at that! The blossoms are at their very best right now.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 27, 2018 @ 8:35 pm

  2. They’re such a beautiul, complicated flower. I can’t believe it’s taken me this long to see the long, twisted parts as the “ribbons” that would tie the slippers on. I’m so glad you were able to find them. Knowing an area as well as you know yours certainly helps, even though nature can fool us from time to time.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 28, 2018 @ 4:06 am

    • The copper colored “ribbons” are actually sepals. Some folks overlook these too because they often hide in the brush. You have to look closely to see the white spots.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 28, 2018 @ 7:49 am

  3. Marvelous photos, so perfect, even the lovely ribbons. I am so glad you found them too!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — May 28, 2018 @ 5:57 am

    • Thanks Donna. They are well worth looking for, and they appear in some surprising places.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 28, 2018 @ 7:53 am

  4. So unique. Glad you found them.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — May 28, 2018 @ 8:32 am

    • Nature’s garden is just packed with unique wildflowers. Their beauty is amazing! I wish more folks could see them for themselves and also enjoy the habitat in which they live.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 28, 2018 @ 9:30 am

  5. They are pretty for sure and very different from our pink ones, which have also just started blooming.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 28, 2018 @ 3:14 pm

    • I wish we had the pink ones too! There is also a yellow one which is native to the general region here, but I’ve never seen one.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 28, 2018 @ 6:27 pm

  6. Those orchids are gorgeous. They look like a rare orchid that should be protected (as opposed to the common hybrid we get in plant nurseries here).

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — May 28, 2018 @ 6:11 pm

    • Yes, they are sure pretty, but so far they haven’t needed to be protected. I hope they stay that way!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 28, 2018 @ 6:26 pm

  7. Such delicate detail! I bet you can marvel at the flowers for hours!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by de Wets Wild — May 28, 2018 @ 7:52 pm

  8. These ladyslippers are so beautiful; we used to find yellow ladyslippers in the wild where I grew up … they were always hidden in a shady nook.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by juliemjm — May 28, 2018 @ 7:54 pm

    • I wish I could find some yellow ones, but for some reason they don’t seem to grow in the territory where I hike. The white ones like to hide in shady places too.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 28, 2018 @ 8:02 pm

  9. This is the first time I have seen them in Montana WOW they are so beautiful

    Like

    Comment by Jackie Vernon — June 22, 2020 @ 6:12 am


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