Montana Outdoors

May 26, 2018

Mariposa Lily

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 7:54 pm

Pointedtip Mariposa Lily

Pointedtip Mariposa Lily

Pointedtip Mariposa Lily

Pointedtip Mariposa Lily ~ calochortus apiculatus

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24 Comments »

  1. What an unusual Lily. These must look stunning on the forest floor (as I see you have a brown background, not green?).

    They almost look like alien creatures opening their mouths to catch food dropping down (ok, so I’ve got weird imagination 🙂 ).

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Vicki — May 26, 2018 @ 8:18 pm

    • These have a very limited distribution: BC and Alberta in Canada and the US States of Montana, Idaho and Washington (all in the extreme northwest). The character of the blossoms is not obvious until you get very close to them; otherwise they look like little triangles of white. There are several species; this is the first to bloom.

      Liked by 2 people

      Comment by montucky — May 26, 2018 @ 8:32 pm

  2. I remember this one with the hairy petals. What a complicated construction for a simple three-petaled flower. Beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 26, 2018 @ 9:16 pm

  3. We have sego lilies here, as well as Gunnison’s mariposa lily. So Calochortus gunnisonii and calochortus nuttallii. I’ve only ever found one on two separate occasions, and I believe it was the the sego lily both times. Amazingly similar to yours, but without the furry petals. I love all the variety and similarity of flowers from region to region.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Laura Elizabeth — May 26, 2018 @ 10:23 pm

    • I have found several species of Calochortus here but I have not seen a Sego Lily. We have c. elegans, c. apiculatus, and c. subalpinus. I love the variety too and the similarities (and differences) from region to region as well. I’m a little surprised at how many species we share though, but I’ve never spent much time in your region.

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      Comment by montucky — May 26, 2018 @ 10:40 pm

  4. Not only a pretty colour variation, but really great petals, too. Ours aren’t out yet, but you give me hope!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Harold Rhenisch — May 26, 2018 @ 10:52 pm

    • These just began to bloom here at the valley level and there are sure a lot of them. The color variations within this species are interesting.

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      Comment by montucky — May 27, 2018 @ 7:45 am

  5. Absolutely stunning, looks very prehistoric

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by neilirving — May 26, 2018 @ 11:01 pm

    • When I first noticed Mariposa lilies it was the “elegans” species and they were growing at about 5,000 feet elevation. I thought I had found something very rare. Later I found that they are not rare and the “apiculatus” species is very plentiful and widespread at lower elevations.

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      Comment by montucky — May 27, 2018 @ 7:52 am

      • They are spectacular looking, probably easily missed if they are anything like some of our lily’s they only flower for a day

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by neilirving — May 27, 2018 @ 8:30 am

        • I know what you mean about lilies, but these blooms actually last a surprisingly long time, possibly because they are quite compact.

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          Comment by montucky — May 27, 2018 @ 8:45 am

  6. This might be my first hairy flower. How awesomely beautiful and unique this lily is, I love it!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — May 27, 2018 @ 1:00 pm

    • These have more elements than most of the wildflowers, especially the early blooming ones. I wish I understood it all!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 27, 2018 @ 2:14 pm

  7. Gosh what an intricate flower.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by David A Lockwood — May 27, 2018 @ 1:33 pm

    • Yes, it has a lot going on for a flower with only three petals and three sepals.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 27, 2018 @ 2:19 pm

  8. That’s an interesting flower. I can’t guess what all the hairs are for, unless they’re to keep insects down inside.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 27, 2018 @ 2:53 pm

    • Maybe that’s it. Some time I will go through my photos and see which and how many species have hairs, but I’m pretty sure those in this genus have the most.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 27, 2018 @ 5:49 pm

  9. It is very unusual . Does it have a perfume?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — June 2, 2018 @ 2:12 pm


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