Montana Outdoors

May 8, 2018

Yellow Glacier Lily

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , — montucky @ 1:21 pm

Glacier lily, Avalanche Lily

Glacier lily, Avalanche Lily

Glacier lily, Avalanche Lily

Glacier lily, Avalanche Lily

Yellow Glacier Lily, Yellow Avalanche Lily ~ erythronium grandiflorum

These are early spring flowers so they have been blooming for awhile. In fact they are through blooming in most of the lower elevations, but they are in peak bloom now higher up (above 3,000 feet). Their bulbs were an important food item for some of the indigenous people in this region.

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26 Comments »

  1. gorgeous.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by lmachayes — May 8, 2018 @ 1:41 pm

    • Yes, That is one my Mother always looked forward to seeing.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 8, 2018 @ 1:49 pm

  2. That’s a beautiful flower. Except for the color of its anthers it closely resembles our trout lily.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 8, 2018 @ 3:11 pm

    • I’ve seen pictures of the Trout Lily (but never seen one myself). They must be very closely related. Do the Trout Lily petals also curl like the Glacier Lily?

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 8, 2018 @ 3:18 pm

  3. So beautiful! There are so many types of lilies, and I love them all.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candice — May 8, 2018 @ 4:08 pm

    • I’m with you. I have a great fondness for lilies too. Not all are friendly, but all are pretty.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 8, 2018 @ 4:28 pm

  4. I’ve always liked western columbines and other lily types, but this glacier lily is so dainty. The yellow makes it look more delicate than other lilies. Beautiful design.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 8, 2018 @ 4:34 pm

  5. Gorgeous, especially love the 2nd and 3rd images.

    I wish we knew more about the benefits of locally grown herbs & wildflowers. Aboriginal Bush food in Australia is becoming more and more popular in restaurants these days.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — May 8, 2018 @ 6:36 pm

    • I guess it has been several decades now since there was any kind of attention about eating wild plants here. Shucks, most people have no idea exactly where their food comes from any more (except the grocery store).

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 8, 2018 @ 6:53 pm

      • A very sad state of affairs. In many schools here, they have their own chicken runs and veggie gardens and the (primary school) children spend regular periods caring and planting. One of our well known chefs and restauranteurs goes to schools and teaches how to prepare healthy food and introduces the children to fruits and vegetables they may never have heard of too. Many children used to take-away find they actually like green vegetables, many of which they haven’t eaten in the past.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Vicki — May 9, 2018 @ 5:40 pm

        • In this rural area, at least a lot of families have their own gardens, but not much in the cities.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — May 9, 2018 @ 6:00 pm

  6. A beautiful flower, your last image is an artistic stunner!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — May 8, 2018 @ 7:13 pm

    • When you find these there are always a lot of them so, many from which to choose. The last one had two blossoms on one stem and it was in rather high country several miles from the trail head.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 8, 2018 @ 7:20 pm

  7. So pretty.
    Quite often you are showing me my future.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — May 9, 2018 @ 8:03 am

    • Amazing the difference is such a relatively short distance.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 9, 2018 @ 8:18 am

  8. I like the sorts of flowers that droop like that (although I’m sure there is a more technical term).

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — May 9, 2018 @ 9:13 pm

    • There are a lot of wildflowers that do that. I think it is to protest their pollen from the weather. The petals of these will hang down in bad (wet or cold) weather like an umbrella.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 9, 2018 @ 9:35 pm

  9. These are so pretty. They remind me of columbines — I just saw my first of those this spring. The columbine are in the buttercup family, though. That really surprised me. I’m sure there’s a good reason that I’ll eventually figure out. Do their petals curl upwards as they age?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 9, 2018 @ 9:59 pm

    • Actually, they curl in their prime and unfold and look rather bedraggled toward the end of their blooming season.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 9, 2018 @ 10:02 pm


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