Montana Outdoors

April 29, 2018

A little of Nature’s jewelry

Filed under: Spring, Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 12:52 pm

 

Along with the wildflowers that brighten up springtime are these little plants which have no flowers but still have their own pretty display. I doubt that it is often seen because it only occurs in a rather brief part of spring, only when there has been dew during the night, the plants are small enough to be nearly hidden in some of the wide-bladed grasses, and the decorations disappear before noon. I always look forward to seeing them though.

Scouring Rush

Scouring Rush

Scouring Rush

Scouring Rush ~ Equisetum hyemale

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50 Comments »

  1. That’s pretty special. And it’s special that you got the photos of it at that time.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — April 29, 2018 @ 1:19 pm

  2. Well done. Now I need to head out and find examples of this on the scouring rush in Maine.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by lmachayes — April 29, 2018 @ 1:21 pm

    • It’s worth keeping your eye out. and it’s a nice morning pastime.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 29, 2018 @ 1:40 pm

  3. Dew can be like diamonds.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Malcolm R. Campbell — April 29, 2018 @ 1:28 pm

  4. You caught the jewels nicely before they disappeared again. Lovely shots!

    Like

    Comment by Hanna — April 29, 2018 @ 2:00 pm

    • Looking at our weather pattern at the moment, I think they’ll be back again for at least a morning or two.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 29, 2018 @ 2:02 pm

  5. Very pretty in their own right.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by oldpoet56 — April 29, 2018 @ 2:47 pm

    • I agree. They really sparkle for a few days each year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 29, 2018 @ 3:11 pm

  6. Beautiful! Our horsetails haven’t come up yet but they should show very soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — April 29, 2018 @ 3:32 pm

    • I think these are just starting their growing season, but the way the weather has been this year who knows what they will do. The forests at the lower elevations are very dry already.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 29, 2018 @ 4:13 pm

  7. Hi Montucky, Great photography. You are excellent at showing the tiny details. Great work! Have a super good coming week.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — April 29, 2018 @ 4:36 pm

  8. Stunning! I wonder if it’s dew or guttation (water expressed out of the plant)? Absolutely beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jessica Postol — April 29, 2018 @ 6:27 pm

    • I really don’t know about that, but I’ve always found them on cool mornings during a cool, cloudy spell and with dew on other leaves, spider webs, etc.

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      Comment by montucky — April 29, 2018 @ 6:40 pm

    • It only occurs under the conditions you described, early morning, humid, dewy. I’ve never heard of guttation from a horsetail, but it sure has that look to me.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by Jessica Postol — April 29, 2018 @ 6:51 pm

      • I was not aware of guttation before, but that would explain how those drops form (I’ve always wondered), and those have always been the conditions when I have seen them.

        Like

        Comment by montucky — April 29, 2018 @ 7:03 pm

      • Did a little checking around, and yes, horsetails do show guttation but it’s unusual. The drops are fluid pushed out from the xylem vessels of the plant, and it happens when it’s cool and humid like that. Dew is different, it’s condensed from the atmosphere (and that’s what is on spider webs, etc. under similar cool, humid and foggy conditions). I’ve seen guttation on the margins of plants around here early in the morning on a few occasions, but never on horsetails, and never so beautiful as you captured in those photos.

        Like

        Comment by Jessica Postol — April 29, 2018 @ 7:12 pm

        • Thanks you for the information Jessica! Now I understand better the nature of the plant and the droplet phenomena. Amazing too that it creates such beauty in the process!

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — April 29, 2018 @ 7:40 pm

        • We often get guttation on the thick fungi growing on tree trunks. The drops show up on the outer rim and underneath as well — took me awhile to figure out how it could have “rained” on the underside to the fungus. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by Sally — April 30, 2018 @ 7:49 am

  9. It’s absolutely gorgeous with those dew droplets lingering on the ends. I can well believe its hard to see with the surrounding grass and other plants.

    (the dew droplets remind me instantly of the gorgeous water droplets on Lady’s Mantle. I used to have a potted plant on my old balcony and would constantly be on the lookout for them, not really noticing the flowers in Spring at all)

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — April 29, 2018 @ 7:32 pm

    • I certainly agree they are gorgeous. I was happy to see the explanation from Jessica in the comments just above that the origin of the droplets is probably the process called “guttation”. I wonder if it is the same with the Lady’s Mantle. It produces a beautiful effect!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 29, 2018 @ 7:46 pm

  10. Nicely done, and gorgeous.

    >

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Harold Rhenisch — April 29, 2018 @ 9:51 pm

  11. Lovely, elegant details on such a tiny plant. How interesting the dew drops gather, decorating it with jewels. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — April 30, 2018 @ 6:16 am

  12. Wearing their crystals for us to see. Nature decked out in jewels.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — April 30, 2018 @ 7:04 am

    • Nature produces many different but beautiful displays, doesn’t she! Some, like these are for only a very short duration.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 30, 2018 @ 7:52 am

  13. Thanks again Terry for showing us the small wonders you discover. So often we pass by such beauty without even knowing.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sally — April 30, 2018 @ 7:50 am

    • Yes, we often miss some of the small beautiful things. I’m glad for the camera technology that can bring images of them to our screens. I think that the more people who see these beautiful little things, the more they will be inclined to appreciate them and tend to want to protect them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 30, 2018 @ 7:56 am

  14. These are so cool Terry !!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Bernie Kasper — April 30, 2018 @ 8:11 pm

    • I think so too Bernie. The conditions that cause them are unusual enough that I don’t see them every ear decorated that way.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 30, 2018 @ 8:24 pm

  15. Beautiful! Like a tiered fountain. Gorgeous photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — May 1, 2018 @ 12:25 am

    • Thanks Jo. I think of a fountain when I see them like this too.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2018 @ 6:16 pm

  16. I’m so happy to see these again. I think they’re beautiful. I don’t know if I noticed it in the past, but today the chevron design that’s especially pretty in the bottom photo reminds me of Venetian trade beads.
    The information about guttation was interesting. I found that it even can happen on houseplants. What I’m not sure is how to distinguish dew drops from guttation drops outdoors, where either condensation or guttation (or both) could happen.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 1, 2018 @ 4:18 pm

    • Until Jessica commented, I had never heard of guttation and I’m glad that she pointed it out. It was dry yesterday and last night, and this morning they didn’t have the droplets. Today is cold and rainy, so they will probably have them in the morning. Guttation makes more sense than dew drops: I could never figure out the physics of that.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2018 @ 6:21 pm

      • Well, I think that dew drops also are part of the equation. If they weren’t, they wouldn’t appear on spiderwebs, boat rigging, car tops, and an assortment of other non-living things. On the docks, it’s always easy in the summer to see who’s left the air conditioning running in their boat. The colder fiberglass is covered with drops of condensation, while the boats with warmer interiors are perfectly dry. Ah, the complexities of science!

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by shoreacres — May 2, 2018 @ 10:04 pm

        • After a very cool (but dry) night, I noticed dew on the exposed grasses, but none on the grasses under the canopy of the trees and brush. However, the rush that was also under the shelter of the trees were loaded with drops. Perhaps evidence of both dew and guttation?

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — May 3, 2018 @ 8:25 am

  17. They really could be diamonds perched there. I especially like the first photo where the bokeh from the plant in back also sparkles.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — May 2, 2018 @ 7:34 pm

    • You know, I doubt that diamonds could decorate these little plants much better. Yes, I like that photo too.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 2, 2018 @ 7:42 pm

  18. Beautiful .. they don’t need flowers do they when sporting those dew drops .. lovely 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — May 3, 2018 @ 12:38 am

  19. Wonferful pics!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Atmosfere Handmade Gifts — May 11, 2018 @ 9:06 am

    • Thanks. I look forward to the time when they look like that. It is hard to get good photos of them but worth the effort because they are small enough that with just the eye one can’t see just how pretty they are.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 11, 2018 @ 9:57 am


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