Montana Outdoors

April 26, 2018

Few-flowered Shooting Star

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 12:43 pm

Shooting Star

Few-flowered Shooting Star ~ Dodecatheon pulichellum

This flower has been a favorite of mine for about seven decades and I have over a hundred pictures of it in my archives, but yesterday when I ran across this specimen growing along the Munson Creek Trail leading up to the higher ground of the KooKooSint Ridge I couldn’t resist taking one more picture. I think this shows the color and details of the flower better than any of the others that I have taken.

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30 Comments »

  1. The shooting star is also a favorite of mine. I’m not surprised you have a lot of pictures of these.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Malcolm R. Campbell — April 26, 2018 @ 12:46 pm

    • That flower was always the highlight of the bouquets that I always picked for my mother when I was a kid. I’ve loved it ever since.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 26, 2018 @ 2:13 pm

  2. Lovely!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by centralohionature — April 26, 2018 @ 1:17 pm

    • Thanks! It is one of the loveliest of the wildflowers here in my opinion.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 26, 2018 @ 2:15 pm

  3. That has to be the prettiest colour ever.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — April 26, 2018 @ 1:33 pm

    • I think so too. Despite their being very small flowers I seem to notice them at a great distance. The color is so distinctive.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 26, 2018 @ 2:16 pm

  4. I couldn’t have passed it by without more photos either.
    This is a great shot and they’re beautiful little flowers!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — April 26, 2018 @ 4:28 pm

  5. Yes, it is a beautiful portrait of it.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — April 26, 2018 @ 4:38 pm

    • Thanks Tammie. I felt that picture displayed its beauty well. They are such pretty flowers!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 26, 2018 @ 5:05 pm

  6. These are awesome !!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Bernie Kasper — April 26, 2018 @ 4:40 pm

    • Thanks Bernie. I love them and continually wonder what that display is all about. I’m sure each facet has a purpose.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 26, 2018 @ 5:06 pm

  7. Such a beautiful creation of nature!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — April 26, 2018 @ 4:58 pm

    • Mother nature is a wonderful designer, isn’t she! Who else could possibly think that up and execute it so well!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 26, 2018 @ 5:08 pm

  8. I’m not surprised it is one of your favourites. The yellow and pinkish/mauve colour make it a refreshing sight in the usual green of the landscape. It’s like a bright multi-coloured sweet in a lolly shop. (not sure whether Americans call sweet concoctions, sweets, candy or lollipops).

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — April 26, 2018 @ 6:00 pm

    • That’s an apt analogy! They do look like something from a confectionery. (We use all of those for sweets.) They have a fairly short blooming season, but here as you go up in elevation they are blooming later into summer.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 26, 2018 @ 6:18 pm

  9. Wonderful detail! It’s very hard to beat shooting stars. Better than roses, certainly!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by pat — April 26, 2018 @ 6:28 pm

    • Yes, they are beautiful flowers. I am fascinated by all of the wild flowers and agree they are prettier than roses, although they are so small most folks don’t get a really good look at them as they do with the much larger roses. I’ve read that they can be grown in flower gardens from seed, but transplanting the plants never works well. I’d thing you would need a small flower garden at about eye height to really see them well.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 26, 2018 @ 7:40 pm

  10. I love shooting stars! While the wild ones are lovely, they rarely make an appearance in my woods so I planted seeds in my flower beds (perhaps Dodecatheon meadia). They are quite hardy here in Alberta.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Margy — April 26, 2018 @ 8:57 pm

    • These seem to be quite hardy here: they are early spring flowers. I’m not familiar with the meadia species and it isn’t listed on the Burke Museum website (at the U of Washington and covers the pacific northwest and extends into this area). How do they do in your flower beds?

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 26, 2018 @ 9:05 pm

      • They like partial shade, and prefer average to moist soil. They reseed easily if you leave the seed heads on for the rest of the summer. Mine have formed a very dense clump, which I should probably split up and transplant to other locations.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Margy — April 28, 2018 @ 9:16 am

  11. I saw my very first Shooting star the other day while we were hiking… I took a photo because I did not know what it was… they are so beautiful and unique… great photo of my new favourite wildflower.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Maggie — April 27, 2018 @ 11:27 am

    • I’m glad that you were able to see one! they ae such pretty little things! I hope you will find more around!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 27, 2018 @ 7:21 pm

  12. I would never tire of photographing it either! So very beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — April 28, 2018 @ 1:01 am

  13. Spot on! It’s gorgeous!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by dhphotosite — April 28, 2018 @ 7:19 am

  14. How pretty! I don’t recall ever seeing one.

    Like

    Comment by Candace — April 28, 2018 @ 5:46 pm

  15. Beautiful colour and detail … easy to see why they named it shooting star 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — May 1, 2018 @ 1:02 am


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