Montana Outdoors

March 17, 2018

Woodland Star

Woodland Star

Small-flowered Woodland Star ~ Lithophragma parviflorum

(This could also be Lithophragma glabrum. I find it impossible to positively tell them apart.)

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27 Comments »

  1. Now I’ve got “Spring is busting out all over” in my head. Delightful!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Pat — March 17, 2018 @ 10:11 am

    • There should be three or four more wildflowers blooming before March is over, and then their procession will really begin in April. But this is a start!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 17, 2018 @ 10:36 am

  2. It’s fun to see your variety of Wildflowers! Spring is getting closer.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Reed Andariese — March 17, 2018 @ 11:30 am

    • Yes, you can feel it in the air now, especially in the evenings. The variety of wildflowers that we have here is amazing. In the small area (about 2,000 square miles) of western Montana in which I roam I have identified over 200 different species.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 17, 2018 @ 11:40 am

  3. That’s beautiful. Now it looks like you’re ahead of us!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — March 17, 2018 @ 2:49 pm

  4. What a beautiful flower. So delicate and yet those leaves, (that are faintly visible), look pretty hardy and relatively thick.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — March 17, 2018 @ 5:26 pm

    • It is very delicate, standing only perhaps 10 cm tall and shimmering in the slightest breeze, but it withstands the freezing nights and the occasional snows of spring.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 17, 2018 @ 6:25 pm

  5. Such uniquely shaped petals!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by de Wets Wild — March 17, 2018 @ 8:10 pm

    • There is an incredible diversity among the wildflowers in the region. Each seems to have its own success strategy. The more I study them it seems the less I know about them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 17, 2018 @ 8:24 pm

  6. Very pretty, whichever it is. Love the unique petal shape.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — March 18, 2018 @ 8:53 pm

    • Yes, they are really pretty, but so small that you almost have to lie down next to one to see it somewhat well.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 18, 2018 @ 8:55 pm

      • And if you did that to take its picture it probably wouldn’t be the first time you’ve lain down on the ground in the middle of nowhere, talking to a flower. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by wordsfromanneli — March 19, 2018 @ 7:36 am

  7. The arrangement of the petals reminds me of our sneezeweed — it has the same kind of gaps between the ray flowers: at least, the ones I’ve seen are that way. This really is attractive. It’s a smart plant, too, to keep wrapped up in those furry buds, just in case!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — March 18, 2018 @ 9:03 pm

    • I think you are right about the furry buds. Plants have many very interesting success strategies and I’m sure that is one of them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 18, 2018 @ 10:15 pm

  8. Hi Montucky, Another excellent flower picture. I love the hue of that purple. Wow! Glad you observe carefully and share the beautiful blooms. Have a wonderful day – raining here in Central FL so no birding today.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — March 19, 2018 @ 11:39 am

    • Thanks! It has been intermittently raining and snowing here for the last few days.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 19, 2018 @ 7:26 pm

  9. Lovely shade of purple!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — March 20, 2018 @ 11:25 pm

    • They come in white too. The color is very subtle, although at a distance quite clear.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 21, 2018 @ 5:31 pm

  10. I don’t remember hearing about this one. Happy intro to spring.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — March 23, 2018 @ 8:14 pm

    • It’s another very small one. The species will bloom for a month or so, and then the larger wildflowers start.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 23, 2018 @ 8:47 pm

  11. Very beautiful – photo and flower.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — March 27, 2018 @ 12:27 am

  12. These Woodland Stars, are they insect eaters? It looks like it, considering those seemingly sticky downy hairs.
    Ellington

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Arletta Ellington — April 5, 2018 @ 2:50 pm

    • They are not insect eaters. That kind of hair is found on many of the wildflowers here and it may have something to do with protection, perhaps from insects or cold temperatures.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 5, 2018 @ 7:58 pm


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