Montana Outdoors

March 15, 2018

Another early arrival – Whitlow Grass

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , — montucky @ 9:27 pm

This is one of the very small wildflowers in these parts, at about 1/8” across, but very common (widely distributed across North America) and very early to bloom..

Spring Whitlow-grass

Spring Whitlow Grass ~ Draba verna

Spring Whitlow-grass

Spring Whitlow-grass

Spring Whitlow-grass

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36 Comments »

  1. Beautiful!

    >

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Harold Rhenisch — March 15, 2018 @ 9:41 pm

  2. It’s a pretty little thing, but must be so hard to see (although the white would make it easier or rocks or soil I suppose).

    On the other hand, despite being very short-sighted, I see the smallest thing, or change in flowers myself, so maybe we are people who notice these things (where other people see nothing but the broader landscape).

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Vicki — March 15, 2018 @ 10:08 pm

    • Yes, it is difficult to see; when standing and looking down, just a speck of white. Later, they will begin to bloom in profusion and then they are more noticeable, as a dim cloud of white spread over a fairly large area. I think those who photograph natural things are more sensitive to small things and tiny specks of color than those who don’t.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 15, 2018 @ 10:21 pm

  3. Amazing that any flowers are blooming in Montana now

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Michael Andrew Just — March 15, 2018 @ 10:26 pm

    • These are the first two species, and their timing is just about normal. They are very small and grow close to the ground for good reasons.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 16, 2018 @ 8:25 am

  4. This is so great! The beginning of the march of spring plants and flowers.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — March 15, 2018 @ 10:55 pm

    • Yes, the beginning. The arrival of the different species are in an order and spaced out until suddenly lots more species begin to bloom. I wonder if that isn’t to match the hatch and arrival of their pollinators.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 16, 2018 @ 8:28 am

      • Most likely, but the changes in our climate are playing havoc with that up our way. The pear and plum trees are always the first fruit trees to bloom and the last two years we’ve had very poor crops because it was wet and cold at that time and not a bee in sight.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by wordsfromanneli — March 16, 2018 @ 9:17 am

  5. Interesting plant! And pretty. Don’t think I’ve seen such a deeply split petal before. Wonder how it got to be called a grass. Maybe that word used to mean something a little different. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Pat — March 16, 2018 @ 4:54 am

    • I’ve wondered why they are called grass too. Perhaps it is because their preferred habitat is grassland where they bloom among the first developing grasses.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 16, 2018 @ 8:30 am

  6. Pretty little thing. I’m amazed that your wildflowers are already showing their pretty selves. It’s been cold and definitely not spring-like here in our neck of the woods. Snow flurries again today like it’s been all week. No signs of spring yet, darn that ol’ groundhog!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — March 16, 2018 @ 7:11 am

    • These early blooming species seem to do well when daytime temperatures get into the high 30’s and low 40’s. Snow is in the forecast here for the next few days too, but it won’t amount to much. these plants won’t mind.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 16, 2018 @ 8:32 am

  7. lovely portraits of this tiny flower.
    last year I think I mixed up it’s id with chickweed. Thanks for the id.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — March 16, 2018 @ 12:39 pm

  8. Very nice tiny flowers! Always nice to see flowers starting to bloom so Spring is coming.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Reed Andariese — March 16, 2018 @ 1:27 pm

    • This winter has seemed to be a long one, so the first flowers are very welcome!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 16, 2018 @ 6:56 pm

  9. The burgundy stems and apparently fuzzy leaves (stems too, maybe?) are just delightful, and certainly complement the flower. The name reminds me of our blue-eyed grass and a couple of other very early plants that carry the name “grass,” even though they aren’t. I’ve never explored the reason for calling them grass – I guess I always assumed it had to do with their relatively short stature, and their grass-like leaves.

    Anyway — yours are pretty, and beautifully presented. Happy almost spring!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — March 16, 2018 @ 1:43 pm

    • This isn’t the only plant name that I don’t understand, but ironically it is easy for me to remember it.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 16, 2018 @ 7:01 pm

  10. Nice! I’ve been trying to find that one here but haven’t had any luck so far.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — March 16, 2018 @ 3:32 pm

    • The first ones appeared here yesterday in the sunniest locations.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 16, 2018 @ 7:03 pm

  11. I truly enjoy your pictures. I wish you would state what camera you are using and other details so some of us can learn from you.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Anonymous — March 16, 2018 @ 8:08 pm

    • Thank you! If you click on any of my photos, it will then take you to that photo on my Flickr site. There, below the photo, you will be able to see the camera, lens and all of the settings for the photo.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 16, 2018 @ 8:37 pm

  12. Pretty little thing. I need to look down more. I’m usually looking up for birds, haha.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — March 20, 2018 @ 11:23 pm

    • You gotta look both ways! Especially for these little things, you have to look very close!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 21, 2018 @ 5:30 pm

  13. Delicate and pretty 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — March 21, 2018 @ 11:29 pm

    • They are already at the point of forming quite large mats of delicate white that directs attention to them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 22, 2018 @ 10:35 am

  14. It’s time to pull out the old play on words about Draba not being drab.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — March 23, 2018 @ 8:10 pm

  15. Enjoyable photo – well done. Thank You.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — March 27, 2018 @ 12:28 am

    • Thanks! They are very simple little flowers, but one of the first of spring.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 27, 2018 @ 7:15 pm


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