Montana Outdoors

August 30, 2017

Grouse

Filed under: Birds — Tags: , — montucky @ 10:44 am

Spruce Grouse

Spruce Grouse

These are Blue Grouse who let me get pretty close to them this morning. They are about the size of small chickens. Earlier in the summer a hen and three chicks took up residence at my place when the chicks were about the size of tennis balls. They have stayed here all summer and now I can’t tell the hen from her chicks. It’s unusual to see them here but they are fairly plentiful in the area of the new fire. Perhaps they knew something?

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27 Comments »

  1. When you said they let you get close, I thought of their other name – fool hen. Those are amazing photos of them. Every feather is clear and you’ve caught the first one with her mouth partly open, as if ready to say something or else trying to cool off.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — August 30, 2017 @ 11:07 am

    • They can be a wild as can be or they can act like their nickname indicates. “fool hens”. These have figured out that I will not be a threat to them; and they love having the birds’ water supply always ready.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — August 30, 2017 @ 11:17 am

      • Ahhh…, so that’s the secret. I have kept up the water supply for the birds too. I haven’t refilled the feeders because of the hawks swooping down on unsuspecting songbirds that are feeding, but I always keep the water in the birdbath filled.

        Like

        Comment by wordsfromanneli — August 30, 2017 @ 11:46 am

        • I’ve never had predator problems here, possibly because of the shelter and cover of tall pines in the yard.

          Like

          Comment by montucky — August 30, 2017 @ 11:51 am

  2. Great photos. To have that close for so long is amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by John Purdy — August 30, 2017 @ 12:10 pm

    • These have gotten used to me after being around off and on all summer. They understand that I’m not a threat.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 30, 2017 @ 1:47 pm

  3. Terry:

    Good eating? I remember them supplying fresh meat when I worked as a lookout on Big Hole LO. YUM. Sure beat SPAM.

    Chad

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Anonymous — August 30, 2017 @ 1:30 pm

  4. What beautiful birds. It’s good to know they are away from the fire!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — August 30, 2017 @ 2:17 pm

    • They are lucky to be here and appreciate the access to water.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 30, 2017 @ 4:35 pm

  5. Maybe they sense that your place will stay free of fire.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — August 30, 2017 @ 3:51 pm

    • They have been around all summer so they have been lucky. These are birds that usually live up over about 5,000 feet.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — August 30, 2017 @ 4:37 pm

  6. Beautiful detail on that bird..

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mother Hen — August 30, 2017 @ 6:37 pm

  7. What a superb shot of the grouse. Looks like you bent down low to get that angle. Since birds often rise and scatter before storms and severe weather, perhaps these grouse did come from the fire area 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — August 30, 2017 @ 9:03 pm

    • The bird was higher up on a hill so that’s where the perspective came from. These are two of four that have been here with me all summer. They are a mother with 3 chicks that showed up when the chicks were very small.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — August 30, 2017 @ 9:07 pm

  8. Adorable!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Dana S. Hugh — August 31, 2017 @ 4:36 am

    • They really are! This family has been with me all summer and I’ve enjoyed seeing them!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — August 31, 2017 @ 7:47 am

  9. Your comment about them perhaps sensing something struck a chord. I was listening to our outdoors show this morning, and the fishing guides were talking about their weeks-long observations that the trout and redfish just haven’t been where they’re usually found. Now that all this fresh water is pouring into the bay systems, it seems clear that the fish had moved ahead of the flood that would decrease their food supply and so on. Of course no one has been out and about yet to see where they’re moved, but some of the guys have offered some predictions about where the fish will be found, and it will be interesting to see how accurate the predictions will be.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — September 1, 2017 @ 5:58 am

    • It’s interesting about the fish. Last night I heard some speculation about the elk up here and where they might have taken refuge from these fires. Despite all of the areas beiing consumed, there are still huge areas that can provide refuge for them.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — September 1, 2017 @ 8:52 am

  10. Special being close .. she appears to be enjoying the limelight. Nice shots 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — September 1, 2017 @ 12:47 pm

  11. Neat. I’d love to see one.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — September 1, 2017 @ 1:23 pm

    • This is the first time I’ve seen any of this species at the house. They usually live at over about 4500 feet.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — September 1, 2017 @ 1:47 pm

  12. Have you heard anything about the McCully fire in the Little Thompson/Big prairie area? No information is being posted, but a Tyoe III team took over today.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Marcia Johnson — September 2, 2017 @ 10:37 pm

    • I heard that it went out of control a couple of days ago, but nothing since.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — September 2, 2017 @ 10:43 pm


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