Montana Outdoors

July 31, 2017

High elevation sunset

Filed under: Patrick's Knob roadless area, Sunsets — Tags: — montucky @ 11:14 pm

Sunset from a peak

Photo taken from Patrick’s Knob, western Montana ~ color provided by smoke from a large wildfire just to the south of the peak.

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32 Comments »

  1. Smoke will do that. Beautiful picture, but sad to think about that fire.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — July 31, 2017 @ 11:27 pm

  2. Stunning. I stared it for a long time.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — August 1, 2017 @ 12:08 am

    • I enjoyed watching the sun disappear behind the mountains at the horizon.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 1, 2017 @ 7:09 am

  3. Stunning colour…..shame about the fire behind the lovely coloured skies.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — August 1, 2017 @ 12:32 am

    • The orange sky colored the landscape. I will post a few more photos from up there.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — August 1, 2017 @ 7:11 am

  4. Gorgeous. 🌈

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by heartandsoul974 — August 1, 2017 @ 3:19 am

  5. The minimalism of this panoramic sunset is part of its appeal.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — August 1, 2017 @ 4:57 am

  6. It’s a gorgeous photo and I am partial to sunsets. But I find it makes me saddened to think that the color that makes it that beautiful is from something so destructive. Are the wildfires being somewhat contained?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — August 1, 2017 @ 7:09 am

    • Most of the fires are small and are being contained but there are still several large ones that will probably burn until winter including this one. The largest one in the eastern part of the state has now been contained after it burned an area larger than New York City. I’m afraid there will be many more new fires before summer is through.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 1, 2017 @ 7:16 am

      • Wow! I remember when we lived in Oregon, there were wildfires in the eastern part of the state and I was just amazed at how much destruction they caused and how quickly they spread. So hard to comprehend how large an area wildfires can decimate if you haven’t lived in the West, I think.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — August 1, 2017 @ 7:30 am

        • Yes, I think one must see one of these fires to become calibrated to the magnitude of them. They are especially graphic when viewed from the air or from a mountain peak. I’m still trying to figure out exactly where the current one here is.

          Like

          Comment by montucky — August 1, 2017 @ 8:26 am

  7. Terry:

    This fire has been named the “Liberty Fire” and is 2,500 acres and 14.5 miles east of Arlee up the south fork of the Jocko River Valley. Co-ordinates from InciWeb Forest Fires for this fire are:
    47.139 latitude, -113.78 longitude

    Chad

    Like

    Comment by Anonymous — August 1, 2017 @ 11:43 am

    • No, Chad, this is not the Liberty fire. This one is due south of here and if it is indeed an existing fire, it is the Sunrise fire south of Superior.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 1, 2017 @ 12:12 pm

  8. Terry:

    Sorry about that. Sunrise Fire is due south of you at 6,400 acres and at the following co-ordinates: 47.037 latitude, -114.879 longitude

    Chad

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Anonymous — August 1, 2017 @ 2:08 pm

    • Chad, I know exactly where the Sunrise fire is, and it’s now over 10,000 acres.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — August 1, 2017 @ 2:32 pm

  9. That’s one good thing about a forest fire; the sunsets can be unbelievable.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — August 1, 2017 @ 3:35 pm

    • This was colorful but not widespread. The prevailing winds have kept nearly all of the smoke away from this area. We are lucky. The air quality in Missoula (the largest town within a hundred miles) is very bad and there is a small town about 50 miles away where the air quality is called “hazardous”.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — August 1, 2017 @ 3:45 pm

      • There were big fires up in Canada a few years ago and I saw some great sunsets but luckily the smoke didn’t reach here.
        That’s too bad that people have to suffer through it. I have enough breathing problems without that!

        Like

        Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — August 1, 2017 @ 3:59 pm

        • It is very hard on those who have breathing problems, and some have to go some place to get out of it if they can. I am very lucky: it only annoys me and burns my eyes.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — August 1, 2017 @ 4:03 pm

  10. It’s a beautiful photo. It’s interesting how the outline of the mountains softens at sunset, even without the smoke. There aren’t any fires around here, but we have another dose of Saharan dust headed our way. It’s not destructive, but it certainly provides interesting sunsets, and causes the same sort of breathing problems for people who are sensitive to it.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — August 1, 2017 @ 9:15 pm

    • I feel badly for the folks wh have breathing problems and have to suffer through smoke or dust as well. It’s very difficult and threatening too.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — August 1, 2017 @ 9:51 pm

  11. An amazing shot .. great click! ! Sad to think of the fire though ..

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — August 3, 2017 @ 1:47 pm

    • Over the past century, the fires have grown larger and hotter because we decided to put out every small one that nature started, letting the forests build up fuel that would certainly burn some day. And now we act surprised.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — August 3, 2017 @ 2:07 pm

  12. Stunning shot!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — August 3, 2017 @ 5:21 pm

    • That photo was taken from the top of the tall peak in my post of “Western Montana’s newest fire”. Fortunately, the smoke in that post was from a fire another 20 miles to the south..

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — August 3, 2017 @ 6:29 pm

  13. Incredible!

    Like

    Comment by seekraz — August 7, 2017 @ 1:17 pm


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