Montana Outdoors

July 22, 2017

Patrick’s Knob

Filed under: Patrick's Knob roadless area — Tags: — montucky @ 8:57 pm

About 10 days ago I made a post about hiking the Donlan Saddle trail (USFS trail 205). On Thursday I drove to the top trail head of that trail and then on up to the fire lookout on top of the peak which is called Patrick’s Knob. Here are a few photos from just below the lookout, about 4,000 feet above the valleys around it:

From Patrick's Knob

From Patrick's Knob

From Patrick's Knob

From Patrick's Knob

From Patrick's Knob

From Patrick's Knob

30 Comments »

  1. ….and what an extraordinary location to have a lookout!
    You can see ‘forever’ is my immediate thought.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — July 22, 2017 @ 10:47 pm

    • This isn’t the highest lookout around, but it is in a very strategic location and has 360º views. One of my uncles manned that lookout for several summers in the 1930’s.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 22, 2017 @ 11:08 pm

  2. Beautiful views all around!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — July 23, 2017 @ 2:13 am

  3. Great views. Very rare to come across!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — July 23, 2017 @ 2:20 am

    • Yes. There are few peaks her that have clear views in all directions.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — July 23, 2017 @ 7:15 am

  4. You can see about 150km on a good day, right?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by paparadu — July 23, 2017 @ 6:45 am

    • The distance you can actually see is limited by the elevations of the next mountain range. To the south (in the second photo), the Bitterroot mountains are about 80km and they are higher, so that is the distance to the horizon in that direction. Roughly to the north (in the last photo), you can see much further looking just a little to the right of center. It is hazy in the photo, which is caused by the smoke from a complex of fires in that area that are 60 to 80km away. If the sky was clear in that direction, you could see 150km.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 23, 2017 @ 7:27 am

  5. Thank you for explaining. Helps to get a feeling for the area! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by paparadu — July 23, 2017 @ 8:28 am

  6. That was certainly a worthwhile climb. It looks like there’s a lot of charred wood up there though. Either that or the rocks are naturally dark. I hope you don’t see any more fires this year.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — July 23, 2017 @ 2:04 pm

    • The black rocks are from desert varnish. It is common at the tops of rocky peaks where there is no break from the sun.
      We have 20 fires burning in Montana right now, the largest is a complex of 5 fires with a total of 200,000 acres in the eastern part of the state. It is burning pine trees, dead and down trees, grass, and sagebrush: 0% contained. In the right-center of the last photo, the fuzzy area at the horizon is caused by smoke from a complex of about 4 fires about 30 miles north of my house. They are under control now. At the left at the skyline in the first photo you can see the smoke plume from a fire burning in the Bitterroot Mountains about 60 miles south of Pat’s Knob.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 23, 2017 @ 4:03 pm

  7. Now that’s a view that stretches forever, and with very few signs of humanity – just the way I like it!
    😉

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by de Wets Wild — July 23, 2017 @ 8:29 pm

  8. Wow, that is some height! What spectacular views. Exhilarating!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — July 24, 2017 @ 1:55 pm

  9. What a fabulous vista .. and the sky is so blue! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — July 26, 2017 @ 1:30 am

    • I’m glad that I went there when I did. We are now experiencing a multitude of fires and the sky is becoming very hazy from the smoke.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 26, 2017 @ 7:17 am

  10. I was stationed at Plains the summer of 1957, and after a Sunday movie was dispatched at 10:30 P.M. to hike up to Patrick Knob following a fire spotted by the lookout. I reached the lookout by 1:30 a.m. It was dead calm; the fire was smoldering in the top of a tree and not traveling, After a few hours rest, we hiked down and felled the tree. I remained there for two hours chopping out and
    burying all ash and charcoal, thoroughly mixing it with cool mineral soil until no heat remained. Then, hiked back up to rejoin my partner at the lookout, and back down to the ranger station. Those were good days and great fellows to work with. I have worked
    on three lookouts – -Jay Point(on the Powell District of the Clearwater-Nezperce N.F., Porphyry Peak and Monument Peak on the Lewis and Clark N.F. in the 1960’s and have been working as a volunteer on the Caribou-Targhee N.F. in eastern Idaho for the past eleven years and visiting campgrounds in connection with the Bear Aware program. Great memories to look back upon going on 90
    years. I was nominated as President’s Volunteer of the Year in 2015 for the Inter-mountain Region. Still cross-country ski and snowshoe. It’s a great life if you don’t weaken.

    Like

    Comment by Evan J. Tibbott — March 27, 2021 @ 1:34 pm


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