Montana Outdoors

July 7, 2017

Over the last week or so:

And when I think they are about over…

Elegant Rein Orchid

Elegant Rein Orchid ~ Piperia elegans

Ocean-spray, Creambush

Ocean-spray, Creambush

Ocean-spray ~ Holodiscus discolor

Brook Cinquefoil

Brook Cinquefoil ~ Potentilla rivalis

Spreading Dogbane

Spreading Dogbane, Apocynum androsaemifolium

Western White Clematis

Western White Clematis ~ Clematis ligusticifolia

Bering Chickweed, Alpine Chickweed

Bering Chickweed, Alpine Chickweed ~ Cerastium beeringianum

Western Pearly Everlasting

Western Pearly Everlasting ~ Anaphalis margaritacea

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28 Comments »

  1. Very nice selection!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by centralohionature — July 7, 2017 @ 5:23 pm

    • Thanks. It has been so hot here lately and I have been making short hikes early in the mornings before the temp goes way up, so I collect a photo here and a photo there.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — July 7, 2017 @ 8:32 pm

  2. Fantastic. Thanks and congrats.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — July 7, 2017 @ 6:02 pm

  3. Hi Montucky, All are quite beautiful! I like the Dogbane best in the series today. Have a fabulous weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — July 7, 2017 @ 6:36 pm

    • FOr such a common and plentiful plant, the dogbane’s flowers are quite pretty. It’s nice to see them just about everywhere in the valley now.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — July 7, 2017 @ 8:34 pm

  4. Beautiful. I especially like pearly everlasting. Often I see them on the roadside, blooming about the same time as the fireweed and the pearlies are often making a foot-high border in front of the three-foot-high fireweed. Nature is such a great gardener.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — July 7, 2017 @ 6:54 pm

    • The pearly everlasting and the fireweed are just beginning to bloom here now. It’s good to see them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 7, 2017 @ 8:36 pm

  5. Love the Elegant Rein Orchid…almost like some of the petals have silver Christmas dust on them.

    It really is extraordinary how many flower species bloom at this time of the year in such a wild mountainous region.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — July 7, 2017 @ 7:42 pm

    • There are five wild orchids here that all have the same physical characteristics but have different blossoms. All grow in spikes up to about a foot and a half tall, the whole stalks being covered with the small blossoms.
      I know there are other species in bloom at higher elevations, but while deep snow stopped me from getting there earlier, the daytime heat has stopped me now. The season quickly and dramatically changed. I hope after another week or so the temperatures will get back down to more seasonal levels. It was 39.4 Celsius today.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 7, 2017 @ 8:45 pm

      • Wow! That’s hot! Hope it cools down a bit soon. I’m surprised the flowers aren’t wilting in that heat.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Vicki — July 8, 2017 @ 6:18 am

        • For such small, seemingly fragile things, wildflowers are extremely rugged and finely tuned to live in their chosen habitat, and that chosen habitat usually has sharply defined and very narrow limits.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — July 8, 2017 @ 7:34 am

  6. The Pearly Everlasting looks like the artificial straw flowers that used to decorate our hats and purses when I was a kid. They’re so pretty. I don’t remember seeing the ocean spray before — what a good name for such a cascading flower.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — July 7, 2017 @ 8:40 pm

    • Pearly everlasting is an excellent flower for dried flower arrangements because they last a long time without degrading and retains a good fragrance.
      Ocean spray really makes its self known. It is a shrub that grows up to 12 feet tall and the plant had lots of those groups of blossoms. It is beautiful interspersed through the forest!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 7, 2017 @ 8:55 pm

  7. Nice closeups and detail shots! Always enjoy your posts!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Reed Andariese — July 8, 2017 @ 5:23 am

  8. Very nice, Terry…I love that Western Pearly Everlasting…used to see a bunch of that in the Wasatch…..

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by seekraz — July 8, 2017 @ 3:24 pm

    • It’s just starting now for this season. I think of it as a very comforting flower: it’s beautiful and blooms faithfully every year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — July 8, 2017 @ 6:35 pm

  9. Wonderful documentation!!!,

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Hanna — July 8, 2017 @ 4:01 pm

    • Thank you Hanna. I often spend more time determining their identification than I do taking their pictures.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 8, 2017 @ 6:37 pm

      • That doesn’t surprise me with your description of the species. I’m still surprised by the amounts of flowers you are showing.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Hanna — July 9, 2017 @ 11:19 am

        • I am amazed at the number of species I see in just the small area through which I wander (only about 2,000 square miles). This summer I think I’ve seen only about half of the ones that are here. Just timing.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — July 9, 2017 @ 1:07 pm

  10. You know what came to my mind while looking at your photos? That song from The Sound of Music….”the hills are alive with the sound of music” except in my mind I was singing “the hills are alive with a burst of wildflowers.” ♪♫

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — July 9, 2017 @ 10:50 am

  11. Beautiful …

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — July 11, 2017 @ 11:12 pm

  12. Looks like they’re putting on the grand finale for you.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — July 14, 2017 @ 1:43 pm

    • Pretty much so at the valley elevation. High up near the peaks though, many of the spring species are beginning to bloom.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — July 14, 2017 @ 4:36 pm


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