Montana Outdoors

May 28, 2017

A few more

A short hike as a retreat from a hot afternoon revealed a few more wildflowers in bloom, and a few drops of rain helped provide a cool break.

Pointedtip Mariposa Lily

Pointedtip Mariposa Lily ~ Calochortus apiculatus. About the size of a 50 cent piece.

Early Blue Violet

Early Blue Violet ~ Viola adunca

Feathery False Lily of the Valley

Feathery False Lily of the Valley ~ Maianthemum racemosum. The blossom is about 4 inches tall.

Silvery Lupine

Silvery Lupine ~ Lupinus argenteus. This one is about a foot tall.

Starry False Lily-of-the-valley

Starry False Lily-of-the-valley ~ Maianthemum stellatum. This blossom is about 3 inches tall.

Blue Speedwell

Blue Speedwell ~ Veronica anagallis-aquatica. Quite a name for a blossom only 1/8 inch wide!

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24 Comments »

  1. Awesome few more. Thanks and congrats.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — May 28, 2017 @ 8:00 pm

  2. You’re so lucky to have so many kinds of wildflowers around you.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 28, 2017 @ 8:15 pm

  3. i like all those flower. They are so beautiful to see.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nivethalive — May 28, 2017 @ 8:17 pm

  4. Another great set of flora!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Michael Andrew Just — May 28, 2017 @ 8:55 pm

    • This time of year, every hike is like a treasure hunt for someone who likes wildflowers.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 28, 2017 @ 9:00 pm

  5. What a cheerful array of flowers, especially the Silvery Lupine.

    (I’m sure you’ve guessed that I’m feeling a bit ‘down’ at the moment, so it’s good to view the Montana wild flowers 🙂 )

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — May 29, 2017 @ 12:23 am

  6. They are lovely close ups, Montucky!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Hanna — May 29, 2017 @ 4:28 am

  7. Your photos are so crisp and clear — I can almost reach out and touch them! Hopefully many of these will be blooming here before too long. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sally — May 29, 2017 @ 7:37 am

  8. I’m surprised that you have so many false lily of the valley varieties. We have only one that I know of, called Canada mayflower (Maianthemum canadense,) which forms huge colonies where nothing else grows.
    That’s a beautiful lupine. Ours have just started blossoming.
    Those speedwell flowers need all you can get out of a macro lens. I don’t know how many photos of them I’ve rejected!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 29, 2017 @ 1:39 pm

    • I have found only the two false lily of the valley species. There is a third in this general area, but I think it stays a little to the west of us, in northern Idaho.
      Yes, those Speedwells are really tiny, but they are pretty ornate compared to most of the really small flowers.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 29, 2017 @ 7:44 pm

  9. I’m newly aware of all the ways flowers arrange themselves to help with the pollination process, and it seems to me that all those little hairs on the Mariposa lily probably contribute. In fact, I think I see a little smudge of pollen on the right petal! As for the Speedwell, the name seemed so familiar. Finally, it came to me. The Speedwell also was the ship that, along with Mayflower, transported the Pilgrims to America!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 29, 2017 @ 8:36 pm

    • I suspect that every detail about a flower has evolved either to attract a pollinator or to effectively deal with the physical attributes of the pollinator so it can efficiently use the pollen. Along with the blossoms, I have seen who knows how many insects that somehow relate to blossoms. It would be a very interesting study to see who does what to whom and when in the process.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 29, 2017 @ 9:54 pm

  10. I especially like the texture and furriness of the first one.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — May 30, 2017 @ 9:06 pm

    • There are at least a half dozen species of these. I will try this year to find the one I like the most: it has purple hairs

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 30, 2017 @ 9:59 pm

  11. Beautiful .. I have just planted lupin as a cover crop. Doubtful that they will look as glorious as this one though .. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — June 3, 2017 @ 12:44 am

    • As do nearly all of the wildflowers, these seem prettier and more robust this year. I plan to get out as much as possible!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2017 @ 3:23 pm


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