Montana Outdoors

May 19, 2017

Indian Paintbrush appreciation…

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 8:57 pm

Scarlet Indian Paintbrush

Scarlet Indian Paintbrush

Scarlet Indian Paintbrush

Scarlet Indian Paintbrush

Scarlet Indian Paintbrush

Scarlet Indian Paintbrush

Scarlet Indian Paintbrush

Scarlet Indian Paintbrush ~ Castilleja miniata

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38 Comments »

  1. Very pretty!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mother Hen — May 19, 2017 @ 9:17 pm

  2. She is so dark out your way. Cool.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Harold Rhenisch — May 19, 2017 @ 9:19 pm

    • Yes, these seem to have a deeper color than usual. Perhaps because they are very new blooms.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 19, 2017 @ 9:26 pm

  3. I see that you couldn’t make up your mind which of these beautiful photos to post so you posted them all. I’m glad you did. They’re gorgeous. The little hairs are so clear on the photos. Great shots. (You probably took 20 more, right?) Now, I have a question: Is the Indian paintbrush different from the Indian rose?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 19, 2017 @ 9:22 pm

    • Yes, they were such pretty specimens I couldn’t resist posting them all. They have come up within the last two weeks and so are fresh and vibrant.
      I have never hear of an Indian rose in the context of the “Indians” of North America, but there appears to be rose flowers from India that are called India Rose. If I search the USDA Plants site for “Indian Rose” it shows several entries in the genus “Dalbergia” and shows an “Indian Rosewood” native to only Florida.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 19, 2017 @ 9:46 pm

      • In northern BC we saw this flower often (Indian paintbrush) but I thought I had heard it called Indian rose. That’s obviously a mistake or a local name for the same thing. I seem to recall a flower very similar to this one but maybe more pink and shaped even more like a paintbrush, but it may have been the same thing in an earlier stage of bloom. These are just childhood memories and not necessarily accurate. So – Indian paintbrush it is!

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 19, 2017 @ 10:45 pm

        • I wouldn’t be at all surprised to learn that “Indian Rose” would be used as a common name for these. It is fitting. The Burke Museum website lists 19 species of the paintbrush in this region, including a very beautiful pink one that I’ve never run across myself, and a bright orange one that I have seen.

          Like

          Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 9:20 am

  4. Nature has plenty in its kitty. Congratulations for getting them out and share with all. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — May 19, 2017 @ 10:00 pm

    • Yes, there is a nearly endless number of beautiful things in the natural world! I’m pleased that you enjoy seeing these.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 19, 2017 @ 10:18 pm

  5. This is just gorgeous. There are so many varieties, adapted to so many environments. Our Texas paintbrush is Castilleja indivisa. It generally has this same bright red color, although it does tend more toward reddish-orange, and has some color variation. (I’ve seen white and yellow.) But just this year, I spotted a few prairie paintbrush (Castilleja purpurea) up in the Texas hill country. They were so pretty, and rather feathery in comparison to what I’ve known. Still another species is the Wyoming state flower. I think everyone who sees them is attracted to them. Yours certainly are a show-stopper.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 20, 2017 @ 6:47 am

    • More than most other wildflowers, Indian Paints seem to tickle the fancy of a lot of people, especially at a young age. The name does create a lot of interest because it seems to make sense and causes the imagination to take over. There are a lot of different species in the genus “Castilleja”, and a lot of color variety within each species I think. These appeared very bright and deep colored, possibly because they have very recently emerged.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 9:26 am

  6. Lovely study!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by centralohionature — May 20, 2017 @ 8:47 am

    • Thanks. I wish I could encounter each of the Paintbrush species in this same stage of development. It would make an interesting comparison.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 9:28 am

  7. They are wonderful flowers and beautiful photographed , Montucky!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Hanna — May 20, 2017 @ 9:16 am

    • They are indeed wonderful flowers. I always love to see them and they will be in color around here at some elevation or other until next winter’s snow begins to fall.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 9:30 am

      • I’m happy that you have such wonders to watch. They must be a chill to see ❤

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Hanna — May 20, 2017 @ 2:41 pm

        • The scenery in these high mountains is beautiful and the flowers add so much more to it.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 8:46 pm

          • I know the Norwegian mountains best. We always walk in late summer when the mosquitoes are on return. That’s why I do not remember many flowers, but blueberries, mulberries and cranberries are amazing. Every time you take a rest, the candy bowl is set up 🙂
            In the Austrian Alps there were wonderful flowers on the meadows with snowy mountains in the background. I think this is your scenario?

            Liked by 1 person

            Comment by Hanna — May 21, 2017 @ 7:25 am

            • Here I hike as often as I can once the deep snow melts enough to allow access to the high country and the trails that lead to it. The flowers start blooming at the valley level and continue up in altitude as the summer warms up and the snow melts. There are meadows like the ones you described, but usually not large displays of flowers in them. Most of the wildflowers are spread through the mountains in small clearings that let the sun come through the trees, and many are shade-loving and they grow alongside the trails or at the edges of the openings. The peaks, however are often as you described when late summer comes. Many peaks are bare and covered with flowers. They can be very beautiful.

              Like

              Comment by montucky — May 21, 2017 @ 6:31 pm

  8. One of my favorite wildflowers from the Mountain West…but ours in the Wasatch were of the wider-petaled varieties. Beautiful images, Terry…such crispness and fine details….very nice.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by seekraz — May 20, 2017 @ 9:32 am

    • They are all pretty, aren’t they. There seems to be a species or two that are unique to each area. I’ve seen different species that seem to be altitude-distributed.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 2:33 pm

      • Yes, they are pretty…and I agree that there seems to be a species distribution by altitude…I have found some down here, as well…in Sycamore Canyon, just north of Cottonwood, that had the thinner petals like yours….

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by seekraz — May 20, 2017 @ 5:31 pm

  9. captured their
    best sides 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by smilecalm — May 20, 2017 @ 10:30 am

    • These are growing on a very steep hillside, but they are so bright they are easy to see (and not so easy to get up to).

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 2:36 pm

  10. Hi Montucky, I so appreciate your fine skill in taking outstanding pictures of the blossoms! Great snaps! I love the vivid scarlet reds and even those little hairs on each flower! Have a great weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — May 20, 2017 @ 10:50 am

    • Thank you wildlifewatcher! I hope you are having a nice weekend too!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 2:37 pm

  11. Appreciation indeed. Beautiful glimpses and photographs!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — May 20, 2017 @ 2:32 pm

    • Thanks Tammie. The color of these seemed especially vivid. I will watch them later and see if they fade as they age.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 2:39 pm

  12. Beautiful! We have a flower called Indian paintbrush but it’s actually orange hawkweed and it doesn’t look anything like a paintbrush. When it’s in bud yours really does look like one.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 20, 2017 @ 2:52 pm

    • There are yellow and green colors too, but they don’t have quite the same appearance as the reds.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 20, 2017 @ 8:57 pm

  13. So pretty .. I love the background in the last shot, wonderful contrast

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — May 23, 2017 @ 2:48 pm

  14. I love their red color, although my favorite color is blue. Again stunning photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — May 24, 2017 @ 2:17 am

    • All of the flower colors seem deeper and more vibrant this year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 24, 2017 @ 8:15 am

  15. They’re beautiful.

    Like

    Comment by Candace — May 26, 2017 @ 6:43 pm


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