Montana Outdoors

May 3, 2017

New arrivals

Redstem Stork's Bill

Redstem Stork’s Bill ~ Erodium cicutarium

Hooker's Fairybells

Hooker’s Fairybells ~ Prosartes hookeri

Utah honeysuckle

Utah honeysuckle ~ Lonicera utahensis

Blue-eyed Mary

Blue-eyed Mary~ Collinsia parviflora

Arrowleaf Balsamroot

Arrowleaf Balsamroot~ Balsamorhiza sagittata

(As a size comparison, a few Blue-eyed Marys can be seen in the background of this last photo.)

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24 Comments »

  1. For some reason, this ipad superimposes your sidebar over your photos, so I couldn’t see the little blue flowers in the last photo. But not to worry! I went to Flickr, and there they were. We have a blue-eyed grass that I think is about the same size. The tiny flowers are delighting me more and more — partly because of the ability of a macro lens to show their details.

    The Hooker’s fairybells are delightful. Do they always grow in pairs? I’m thinking that a lot of these must be low to the ground, and covered by other growth. I suspect it takes some dedication to tind them!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 3, 2017 @ 8:30 am

    • There is a fascination to the tiny flowers, partly because they do have to be magnified to be enjoyed and that’s a challenge.Yes the Fairybells grow in pairs, as do the Utah Honeysuckle and Twinflowers. Must be a survival strategy there. Many of the small flowers are low to the ground and very easy to miss seeing under other shrubs and grasses. Some, like the Fairy Slippers need the shade of other plants and I suspect a little shelter from the cold nights.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2017 @ 6:49 pm

  2. Yay for the new arrivals! They were worth waiting for. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — May 3, 2017 @ 8:43 am

    • It’s exciting every year to see each species bloom again, like seeing old friends.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2017 @ 6:51 pm

  3. It’s so heartening to see colours at this time of year. Great pictures!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 3, 2017 @ 8:51 am

    • It is, especially after a long cold and monotone winter like we just had. The greens are wonderful and the colors of the flowers embellish the forest scenes. Certainly a mood changer!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2017 @ 6:53 pm

  4. The Utah honeysuckle flowers look a lot like our native fly honeysuckle(Lonicera canadensis,) which has already stopped blooming.
    I like the tiny blue eyed Marys. They remind me of violets.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 3, 2017 @ 3:32 pm

    • I suspect there are only slight differences between your honeysuckles and these. Now there are blankets of Blue-eyed Marys. They are so tiny though that you just see a tint of blue made of hundreds of tiny dots.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2017 @ 6:56 pm

  5. Great photos, Terry. Must be a delightful time of years seeing all these new Spring flowers in your area.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — May 3, 2017 @ 6:09 pm

    • Thanks Vicki. You would love seeing all of the small flowers that appear just about everywhere you go. I feel like a small child on an Easter egg hunt.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2017 @ 6:57 pm

      • I certainly would 🙂 I find the smallest ‘weed’ much more interesting than cultivated flowers in suburban gardens. I think there’s something rather magical about the way they fight their way through taller grass, reaching for the sunlight.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Vicki — May 3, 2017 @ 8:34 pm

        • This is a great place for folks like us who love wildflowers although finding all of the species here requires some serious hiking due to the variety of altitudes. The territory that I cover in my wanderings is about 2,000 square miles, but in that area I have found and photographed over 200 species of wildflowers.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — May 3, 2017 @ 8:53 pm

  6. The impossibly nuanced blue of that collinsia – you can’t make this stuff up. Beautiful photos, thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by The Gloved Fox — May 4, 2017 @ 2:02 pm

    • Thanks! Yes, the colors seem especially bright this year. Perhaps the rather extreme winter we had makes them seem more so. I’m glad that you like them!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 4, 2017 @ 4:30 pm

  7. I keep thinking about the photo and your description of Buster. What a terrific dog he sounds (and looks) like–clearly he feels the same about you as you do about him. The wildflower photos are wonderful, I am very glad to see them back again. Somehow the orchid, although gorgeous, seems rather scary to me.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by jpostol — May 5, 2017 @ 7:09 pm

    • Yes, both Buster and I got lucky!
      I think a lot about that orchid, wondering why it is so ornate and how its appearance supports its survival strategy. There must be lots of things involved in that that we donn’t understand!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 5, 2017 @ 7:23 pm

  8. Good to see you’re going crazy with wildflowers up there now.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — May 5, 2017 @ 7:17 pm

    • It’s still a strange spring. I see flowers where I wouldn’t expect them and sometimes none where I would expect them. Some species seem more robust than usual and others less. We have finally had two very warm days. The response of the plants will be interesting to see.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 5, 2017 @ 7:25 pm

  9. Your new arrivals are lovely .. spring is underway 😄

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Julie@frogpondfarm — May 6, 2017 @ 12:11 am

    • Yes, finally. We have had temps in the 70’s for the last two days and the plants are responding with rapid growth; at least, those up to the snow line.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 6, 2017 @ 7:32 am

  10. Beautiful arrivals. You’re getting warm temps, we’re getting unseasonably cool ones which is always good here.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — May 7, 2017 @ 4:36 pm

  11. I love Your flower photos every time when I visit Your site.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — May 10, 2017 @ 12:30 am


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