Montana Outdoors

April 19, 2017

Munson Creek Trilliums

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , — montucky @ 6:15 pm

Today a friend and I hiked up Munson Creek to visit my favorite place to see trilliums. This was my 7th annual visit there and only one day later than usual. This year they were not yet at the peak of their bloom, but I brought back a few photos anyway. These are Pacific Trilliums ~ Trillium Ovatum.

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium

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21 Comments »

  1. These are beautiful pictures of them. After you mentioned trilliums the other day I noticed some growing just outside our property line in a small area that hadn’t yet been destroyed by “town mentality.” It’s trillium time all right!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — April 19, 2017 @ 6:44 pm

    • They are among my favorite flowers. I’m glad that you have some! Here we very seldom see them at the valley level but they are widespread higher up.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2017 @ 7:10 pm

  2. That little pair is especially pretty, but you certainly have captured the details of them well in all the photos. I finally went looking, and found we do have one species of Trillium here, but it’s confined to east Texas, and only a few counties there. Another name for it is so cute: “wakerobin.” Have you ever heard them called that? I’m going to have to find out where the name came from. I wonder if it’s associated with the arrival of robins in spring. More research is needed!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — April 19, 2017 @ 7:27 pm

    • The flowers that I saw today were in a mix of sun and shade with a few clouds passing over. I tried to capture the variety of light and how it affects to looks of the flowers.
      There is much disparity among the scientific community about the common names for flowers. I see that the USDA has a long list of “wakerobin” species including the one native to Texas. The Burke Museum lists “wakerobin” as one of the common names for the Pacific Trillium that is most common here. And they keep changing the names, both common and scientific. I don’t understand why it is made to be so hard.

      The most useful book I have on wildflowers comments that “wakerobin” possibly refers to the fact that they are early blooming.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2017 @ 8:23 pm

  3. Grèat. THANKS

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — April 19, 2017 @ 9:10 pm

    • I’m very pleased that you enjoy seeing these things in this part of the country!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2017 @ 9:28 pm

  4. They look especially pretty with the rain drops.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — April 19, 2017 @ 11:06 pm

    • I agree! Many of my favorite flower photos were taken from under an umbrella. The rain drops on these fell during the night or earlier in the morning before we got there. The Glacier Lily photos in my previous post were taken just before a heavy rain swept in and made me scramble for my rain gear. In fact there were rain drops on my camera when I took the last photo of that series. I love that kind of photography!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2017 @ 11:19 pm

  5. It’s nice to see a trillium again. I’m hoping our red ones will be out this weekend. They’re probably a lot easier to get to than yours were!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — April 20, 2017 @ 3:13 pm

    • We have only one species here. These were in my favorite place for them, but it is about 2 miles up the trail (and a thousand feet higher than at the trail head).

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 20, 2017 @ 3:51 pm

  6. So pretty!
    It must be fun to have annual outings.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — April 20, 2017 @ 10:02 pm

    • There are many trails that I hike nearly every year, but this is tied to the bloom of the trilliums and has become a tradition. Luckily, the trail head is only about 10 miles from my home so it is convenient.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2017 @ 7:12 am

  7. I can do without my walk to the grocery store for a hike to Munson Creek 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Hanna — April 21, 2017 @ 5:03 am

    • That’s just one of many trails in the area that I know you would like, Hanna. Only once have I hiked the entire length of it in one day. It starts at about 2400 feet and tops out at about 7,000 feet after 7 miles.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2017 @ 7:15 am

      • I think the difference in height is a good reason for sharing the route up in stages 🙂
        But what a great hike it must be!!!

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Hanna — April 21, 2017 @ 9:20 am

        • It is fascinating to see the differences in the ecology as you go through the different elevations. At the valley level now it is spring, but at the high elevation it is still winter with deep snow and freezing nights. Some plant species will bloom in April and May at the low end, but in late summer at the high end.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — April 21, 2017 @ 9:48 am

          • I think I’ve experienced something similar in Corsica, Montucky. Wailing palms down in the capital, then beech trees, later pine trees and alpine vines and snowy mountains at last all that within a relative small area.

            Liked by 1 person

            Comment by Hanna — April 22, 2017 @ 9:57 am

  8. I always love Your photos presenting Pacific Trilliums. I wish that someday, I could see the,

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — April 26, 2017 @ 1:47 am


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