Montana Outdoors

April 15, 2017

Spring Wildflowers

Eddy Peak

Eddy Peak in the Cherry Peak Roadless Area photographed from the Munson Creek trail head.

One of my favorite days of Spring usually comes on April 18th and for years on that day I have hiked two miles up the Munson Creek trail to an area where there is a large area of Trilliums in bloom. This year it has been cool and rainy with few sunny days and I suspected that the trilliums would be late so today I checked at the footbridge near the trail head where they bloom earlier and found they are just beginning. My hike will be put off another week or so because my favorite area is two thousand feet higher in elevation.

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium, (trillium ovatum)

Several other wildflowers have begun to appear now too:

Yellow Bell

Yellow Bell, (fritillaria pudica)

Dark-throated Shooting Star

Dark-throated Shooting Star, (dodecatheon pulchellum)

Small-flowered Woodland Star

Small-flowered Woodland Star, (lithophragma parviflorum)

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34 Comments »

  1. Beautiful flowers! I love the mountain shot too! Happy spring.😉

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by heartandsoul974 — April 15, 2017 @ 2:16 pm

  2. So good to see them!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — April 15, 2017 @ 3:03 pm

  3. I don’t think any of these grow here but it’s so nice to see flowers again. I saw a few here today so spring is finally happening on both coasts.
    That’s a beautiful shot of the mountain. It does look snowy up there!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — April 15, 2017 @ 3:34 pm

    • Yes, finally both of our areas are starting to warm up. I think you’re still quite a bit ahead.
      My favorite places are up in that snowy area… it will be awhile before it’s accessible.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 15, 2017 @ 8:12 pm

  4. These are beautiful. I’m still partial to the Dark-throated Shooting Star. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — April 15, 2017 @ 5:31 pm

    • The Shooting Star was a childhood favorite. I have many wonderful memories associated with them!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 15, 2017 @ 8:14 pm

  5. So lovely to see your Spring wildflowers. Must be lovely to have the snow gone and better underfoot for hiking. I love the Dark-throated Shooting Star – looks very pretty.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — April 15, 2017 @ 6:44 pm

    • Yes, it’s really nice to have at least a little bit of the trails open. We are still a couple of months from having good access to the high country though. I love the Shooting Star too. What a design for a blossom!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 15, 2017 @ 8:17 pm

  6. So thrilled I get to follow your beautiful adventures.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Anonymous — April 15, 2017 @ 7:25 pm

    • You are more than welcome to come along! I hope to find a lot of things of beauty again this year!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 15, 2017 @ 8:18 pm

  7. So glad I get to follow some of your sweet adventures. Thank You.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Anonymous — April 15, 2017 @ 7:27 pm

  8. The buds of the small-flowered woodland star look remarkably like the buds of our Mexican olive tree. The olive buds are larger, but they have that same lovely fuzziness, and give the same appearance of the bloom being extruded rather than just opening. And I’ve recently learned that we have trilliums in Texas! They aren’t right in my neighborhood, but there’s close enough that a persistent searcher might turn them up. That probably won’t be me, but you never know.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — April 15, 2017 @ 8:54 pm

    • I see the “fuzzy” buds on many wildflowers here and suspect that the fuzz is a form of protection from the cold.
      I’ll Bet that Steve S. could tell you where the Texas trilliums can be found! They are worth looking for. The one in this photo is an early one and very small: the later blooming ones are much larger.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 15, 2017 @ 9:04 pm

  9. As usual wonderful. Congratulations.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — April 16, 2017 @ 4:55 am

  10. Your flower pictures are such a treat! Glad to see that spring has arrived there.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by jpostol — April 16, 2017 @ 10:25 am

    • I’m glad it is too, and I’m happy that you like the flowers!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 16, 2017 @ 11:47 am

  11. They look so fragile these small delicate flowers, Montucky.
    I look forward to warmer weather at your place.
    Wish you a Happy Easter!!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Hanna — April 16, 2017 @ 11:33 am

    • Happy Easter to you too, Hanna! Nearly all of our wildflowers are rather delicate, and so small that they are usually overlooked, which gives me incentive to post closeups so that folks can really see how pretty they are.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 16, 2017 @ 11:51 am

  12. Hi Montucky, Oh I vote “Shooting star”! Beautiful wildflowers. All are so pretty. You are a talented photographer. Have a great coming week!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — April 16, 2017 @ 9:39 pm

    • Thank you wildlifewatcher. Yes, that’s one of the prettiest of the early flowers. You have a great week too!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 17, 2017 @ 7:35 am

  13. Glad to see your pretty wildflowers again. Happy Easter, happy spring!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — April 17, 2017 @ 12:26 am

    • Happy Spring! The flora here is having an unusual spring this year. There has been very little sun and still many cold nights. It would be an interesting time for a botanist. I see some plants greeting spring normally but others much later than usual. I think there has been so little sun that the ground is still much colder than usual. It’s really nice to see the flowers start!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 17, 2017 @ 7:45 am

  14. It is a different sort of year, weather wise.
    I enjoyed your lovely photos. As far as I know I still do not have flowers in my woods, but drove to the northern part of Eureka yesterday and found yellow bells and pasque flowers. I had no idea they lived up there! Joy! A few other flowers too. But today’s post is just to honor the pasque .I look forward to seeing some of your flowers soon too.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — April 17, 2017 @ 2:09 pm

    • Yes, definitely different. Your photos of the pasque flowers are gorgeous! I’ve never found them in this area and never seen one in person.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 17, 2017 @ 6:18 pm

  15. Exquisite as ever! That last photo is amazing – you’ve captured the sparkle of the leaves and petals. Another night-time pic? It’s about time for our swallows to arrive but I think they may be late as we’ve had a cold spring as well.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — April 17, 2017 @ 2:32 pm

    • Thanks Jo. The flower was in deep shad under an antelope bush. I used the flash with a lot of compensation.
      Our swallows haven’t arrived yet either. We are still seeing some very cold nights and cloudy days.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 17, 2017 @ 6:21 pm

  16. Three words…well, one word three times…love, love, love! Spring has sprung finally!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — April 17, 2017 @ 3:00 pm

    • Spring here is still struggling, although these few flowers are doing well. Others are very late to bloom due to the lingering cold. Sure was nice to see these though!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 17, 2017 @ 6:22 pm

  17. Flowers are beautiful. My favorite photo is the first one.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — April 26, 2017 @ 1:51 am


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