Montana Outdoors

July 2, 2016

More from along the Munson Creek trail

Ocean-spray, Creambush

Near the start of the trail, where it first crosses the stream, the vegetation is heavy at the crossing. The flowering shrub to the right of the trail is called “Ocean Spray”.

Ocean-spray, Creambush

Ocean-spray, Creambush ~ Holodiscus discolor

Untitled

Sometimes a tree will fall across the trail. This one is a couple miles up from the trail head. For perspective, I leaned my hiking staff on the tree: the staff is 62 inches long.

Brown-eyed Susan

Brown-eyed Susan ~ Gaillardia aristata

White Spirea, Shinyleaf Spirea

White Spirea, Shinyleaf Spirea ~ Spiraea lucida

Yellow Salsify seed head

Many flowers have already completed their summer and have already gone to seed. This one is from a Yellow Salsify.

Butterweed seed head

I think this one is from a species of Butterweed.

Common St. Johnswort, Klamath weed

Common St. Johnswort, Klamath weed ~ Hypericum perforatum

Thimbleberry

Thimbleberry ~ Rubus parviflorus

Scarlet Gillia, Sky Rocket

Scarlet Gillia, Sky Rocket

Scarlet Gillia, Sky Rocket ~ Ipomopsis aggregata

Liverleaf Wintergreen, Pink Pyrola

Liverleaf Wintergreen, Pink Pyrola

Liverleaf Wintergreen, Pink Pyrola

Liverleaf Wintergreen, Pink Pyrola ~ Pyrola asarifolia

Wood's Rose

Wood’s Rose ~ Rosa woodsii

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25 Comments »

  1. Wonderful creation of God and keen observation of montucky. Great.Congrats.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — July 2, 2016 @ 10:10 pm

    • Nature does hold many beautiful creations and shares them with whomever travels there.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 3, 2016 @ 8:22 am

  2. Love the ocean spray.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nexi — July 2, 2016 @ 10:55 pm

  3. Gorgeous pictures. We have ocean spray spirea here too and of course the wild roses (not sure they are exactly the same though), but I don’t know about the rest.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — July 2, 2016 @ 11:57 pm

    • I think we share many of the same plants, although you have the coastal influence. My favorite wildflower guidebook is titled “Plants of Southern Interior British Columbia and the Inland Northwest”.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 3, 2016 @ 8:26 am

  4. love the ocean spray …. looks like Eden … on the first photo of Liverleaf Wintergreen, Pink Pyrola there appears to be larvae (?) would this be butterfly eggs or an insect of some type?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — July 3, 2016 @ 7:35 am

  5. Wonderful pictures and interesting about that large tree. I follow another blog of a man from the Troy area and he posted some pictures of a hike he took up in his area which showed massive tree downings from the previous winter.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Ron Mangels — July 3, 2016 @ 8:07 am

    • I’ve seen a lot of blowdowns on various trails in this area too. There must have been some severe storms at the higher elevations over the winter.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — July 3, 2016 @ 9:00 am

  6. That would be a sweet trail to hike….or even meander upon……

    Beautiful images, Terry……thank you. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by seekraz — July 3, 2016 @ 8:23 am

    • That’s an excellent trail. It goes about 7 miles up into a roadless area along the creek. The first mile gets a fair amount of hiker traffic, but after that it gets quite steep and there it gets very little traffic. My kind of place!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 3, 2016 @ 9:02 am

  7. I love when you take us on a hike… Lol! We get to see all of that beauty..

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Mother Hen — July 3, 2016 @ 12:32 pm

    • I’m glad that you like the scenes. I’m hoping there will be some very pretty trips this summer!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 3, 2016 @ 8:50 pm

  8. The ocean spray bush is different. I’ve never seen one like it.
    The pink pyrola is unusual too. It’s almost like a cross between a shinleaf and pipsissewa.
    I think my favorite is the scarlet gillia, but I’d love to meet them all in person someday.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — July 3, 2016 @ 3:46 pm

  9. Interesting flowers. Love the dainty red flower of the Thimbleberry. Looks a bit like one of our native fuchsia.
    I thought that ocean spray might be an elder.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — July 3, 2016 @ 5:42 pm

    • The elderberry here is already past its blooming cycle. Things are early this year: huckleberries are beginning to ripen already

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 3, 2016 @ 8:54 pm

  10. This post is full of incredible beautiful flowers. Thank You.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — July 5, 2016 @ 2:36 am

    • I love hiking that trail and each time I go there are different wildflowers in bloom. It’s pretty in winter too, but very icy and cold.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — July 5, 2016 @ 6:40 pm

  11. I’m so proud of myself. When I saw your scarlet gillia, I thought, “That looks like our standing cypress.” In fact, they’re in the same genus. A friend in Michigan mentioned thimbleberry recently, and here it is. That’s fun — they don’t grow in her area, but farther north in the state, so I’m going to send her a link to the photo here. At first, i thought the ocean spray was some sort of wisteria. It gives a bit of the same effect. I once came upon a thick stand of white wisteria in Mississippi, and was so surprised. I’d assumed it only came in lavender.

    Our blackberries are gone already — but some are safely in the freezer, designated for the Christmas cobbler!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — July 5, 2016 @ 5:20 am

    • Some of our berries are already gone too, but my favorite (the Saskatoon) is ripe and the Huckleberries are beginning to ripen in the high elevations. Thimbleberries are gone now too in the valley locations, but in full bloom above about 3,000 feet. It’s nice to follow their ripening schedule as I hike up the steep trails.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — July 5, 2016 @ 6:43 pm


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