Montana Outdoors

May 23, 2016

Meanwhile, in Phoenix it was 88 degrees.

Filed under: Wood cutting — Tags: , , — montucky @ 8:47 pm

Today, after 6 days of rain, I decided it was time to get out a bit and scout for a place to cut firewood for next winter. I chose the Siegel Creek drainage and hoped that the last snow drifts on the high road would be small enough to let me get to the divide. It was a little surprising to see that the road was clear, and I drove the Jeep another 5 miles past the divide, 14 miles (and a mile higher in elevation) after leaving the highway. At about 7,000 feet there was a pretty good snow storm going on and the heater in the Jeep felt good. A lot of blown down trees showed that winter was not kind to the mountain and the rocks on the road made me happy that I had spent an extra couple hundred dollars for extra good tires last winter, but the miles of green were very pretty and the entire trip was quite refreshing.

Siegel Creek

Siegel Creek

Siegel Creek

Siegel Creek

Siegel Creek

Siegel Creek

Siegel Creek

Siegel Creek

Siegel Creek

Siegel Creek

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34 Comments »

  1. Wow….I’ll trade you some of my Phoenix for some of your Montana!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by seekraz — May 23, 2016 @ 8:57 pm

  2. My Jeep would love this road! Jeep has a built in GPS system that tries real hard to get us off the pavement and onto some gravel! Our 2015 trip from Arizona to Alberta would have taken months if we had taken every road Jeep wanted to turn onto!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Margie — May 23, 2016 @ 8:57 pm

    • Your Jeep would have liked this one! Mine is now sitting in the driveways with mud on its sides, smiling!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 23, 2016 @ 9:05 pm

  3. What a wonderful sight for my urban eyes. As I’ve said before, your Montana mountains are a feast for the senses. I can almost smell the mountain air in your images.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — May 23, 2016 @ 9:07 pm

  4. Great. How I wish I am by your side.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — May 23, 2016 @ 9:24 pm

    • I wish you could have been today. You would have enjoyed it!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 23, 2016 @ 9:28 pm

  5. True -age and distance deny that pleasure!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — May 23, 2016 @ 9:58 pm

  6. I love the look of the trees when they get a dusting of snow. Everything looks cool and fresh.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 23, 2016 @ 10:19 pm

    • It is like a big park up there. Clean, untouched and thriving but a little rough around the edges.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 24, 2016 @ 7:42 am

  7. Free firewood sounds like music in my ears – I pay AUD 400 per tonne!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by iAMsafari.com — May 23, 2016 @ 11:08 pm

    • The unit of measure that is used here for firewood is the “cord” (128 cubic feet). A cord, (depending on the species of tree) can weigh up to two and a half tons, and sells now for about $150 (US) per cord commercially. Individuals are allowed to cut dead and down trees in the National Forests with a permit that we can buy for $20 which allows us to cut 4 cords. It takes about 4 cords of pine, fir or larch to heat my house for a winter.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 24, 2016 @ 8:04 am

  8. Ha – my kind of trip, certainly a contrast with the mountains here, but the roads look about the same on a wet day 🙂

    Loved the series.

    David.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by David A Lockwood — May 24, 2016 @ 1:50 am

    • I wish we could trade places for about a month or so. I think we’d both enjoy that!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 24, 2016 @ 7:50 am

  9. I always liked cutting firewood but cutting it there would be a real bonus. I think I’d have a hard time keeping my mind on my work with that kind of scenery nearby! It’s the kind of place where I’d have to just stop and stare.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 24, 2016 @ 3:19 pm

    • I do spend a lot of time looking at the scenery. There is also a lot of wildlife there. Once a bear strolled right past the truck when I was cutting wood. I would have thought that the cain saw noise would have kept him away, but it didn’t. If you cut up there in the fall, you can usually bring back a few Blue Grouse too.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 24, 2016 @ 4:56 pm

  10. I’d probably be scared to drive in that. It’s 88 here right now as I type…and it is unseasonably cool. We’ve been fortunate.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — May 24, 2016 @ 4:13 pm

    • We sure do hold different standards now about what “cool” means, but I well remember those days.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 24, 2016 @ 4:57 pm

  11. Are the downed trees which appear to have been cut back since they were over the road all from winter?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Ron Mangels — May 24, 2016 @ 7:05 pm

    • They were blow-downs and I would have to assume from winter winds. There must have been furious winds along a section of several miles where there were hundreds of trees down, most off the road but many on it as well.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 24, 2016 @ 9:09 pm

  12. I’d have that weather any day over suffocating heat! Beautiful photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — May 25, 2016 @ 2:12 am

    • I would too! It always disturbs me when the weather person on TV blindly calls that “bad” weather when it is exactly the kind of weather that gives the Earth life.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 25, 2016 @ 7:44 am

  13. There so many shades of green here, and every one of them goes delightfully with snow. In the 4th photo from the bottom, there are clear marks that something has crossed the road. Might it have been a fallen tree? an animal? a hiker? I can’t quite tell what kind of marks those are, but I’m pretty sure it wasn’t the chidken crossing the road.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — May 25, 2016 @ 6:54 am

    • Those marks are a channel of water runoff, started by melting snow on the steep slope above and now used to drain an abundance of rain. Fortunately that road consists mostly of rock and small channels like that do little damage there. Eventually, the water reaches the stream far below and flows from there another ten miles into the Clark Fork of the Columbia river, a few drops of it finally entering the Pacific Ocean some five hundred miles away.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 25, 2016 @ 7:53 am

  14. Awesome landscapes. Phots with fog and some white “rime?” are my favorite. Thank You for gorgeous post.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — May 25, 2016 @ 11:04 pm

    • Thanks! These mountains are especially green this year and we are still getting rain and some snow in the higher places.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 26, 2016 @ 9:05 am

  15. looks like the roads i have been wandering.
    also thinking a little bit about firewood, i like to chip away at that task slowly.
    wonderful to see your snow dusted photos.
    What kind of jeep do you have? I total-ed my 4-runner last winter on black ice, going 65 mph! so lucky to have survived. I need to get a 4-wheel or all wheel something before winter. something good for all my adventures too. Any suggestions?

    Like

    Comment by Tammie — May 27, 2016 @ 12:04 pm

    • I’m glad you didn’t get hurt in that wreck! You were indeed lucky!

      Since the mid 80’s I’ve driver Jeep Wranglers. The one I have now is a ’97 with 204K miles and it’s still running great. I don’t especially like the new ones because they have gotten so large, but there’s still some good older ones around. It doesn’t have the romm that your 4-runner had, but I sure love the Jeep. Before the Jeeps I had Toyota Land Cruisers and liked them too, but the Jeep outperforms them.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 27, 2016 @ 7:03 pm

  16. I love bad weather (cold weather the most) and such moody photography. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Dina — June 3, 2016 @ 1:05 am

    • I love bad weather too and when a storm comes up I just have to go out into it. I don’t like very high temperatures though, I guess as I’ve gotten older I just don’t have the tolerance for it. Rain storms and snow storms are my favorite forms of weather, not only because of their beauty but because I know that those gifts of moisture are what keeps our world beautiful and alive.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 3, 2016 @ 9:17 am


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