Montana Outdoors

May 18, 2016

One wouldn’t think this was a lily!

feathery false lily-of-the-valley, plumed solomon's seal,

Feathery false lily-of-the-valley. This is a member of the lily family, but its flowers are certainly different from the other white colored members of the family.

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21 Comments »

  1. Whatever it is LILY IS LILY. U have made a great post. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — May 18, 2016 @ 9:56 pm

  2. Reminds me of some of the succulent flowers I’ve seen in the Botanic Gardens here in Melbourne.
    Even reminiscent of the heaths or ericas when in full bloom.
    As you say, not like a the normal lily at all.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — May 18, 2016 @ 10:27 pm

    • It’s an interesting flower. I see similar elements in it in other flowers, but they are not of this size. The flower is actually very small compared to the rest of the plant which looks similar to hellebore.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 19, 2016 @ 8:55 am

  3. I don’t think I’ve ever seen one. It’s beautiful. So complicated. Not just a few petals and that’s it.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — May 19, 2016 @ 12:04 am

    • It must work because the plant is very plentiful where it grows. It also produces berries. The native people used it for many purposes.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 19, 2016 @ 8:56 am

  4. Beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by centralohionature — May 19, 2016 @ 3:24 am

  5. Lovely! You’re right, though – it looks like some kind of sea creature!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — May 19, 2016 @ 6:32 am

  6. If this is indeed Feathery false lily-of-the-valley (Maianthemum racemosum), then I think it belongs in the Asparagaceae (asparagus family), not Liliaceae (lily family). Both are monocots though.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by PSYL — May 19, 2016 @ 8:46 am

    • The information I have on the family is from the USDA “Plants” website.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 19, 2016 @ 9:01 am

      • Good to know, then you’re probably correct then. It must have been updated since I first learned about this plant.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by PSYL — May 19, 2016 @ 10:12 am

  7. Hi Montucky, How unique! I have never seen one of these unusual-looking flowers. Great photo! Have a wonderful day!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — May 19, 2016 @ 12:56 pm

    • They are fairly plentiful and widespread, but they favor forested areas where they get shade and blend in with the undergrowth. Have a great day tomorrow!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 19, 2016 @ 7:46 pm

  8. I’ve never heard of it and you’re right, I never would have guessed it was in the lily family by the flowers.
    We have a false lily of the valley too but it’s actually Canada mayflower (Maianthemum canadense.)

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 19, 2016 @ 3:25 pm

    • USDA “Plants” show that one growing here too, but I’ve never seen it. We have a flower that looks close (Maianthemum stellatum), but the leaves are entirely different.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 19, 2016 @ 7:54 pm

  9. It’s truly a lily but it has “false” in its name 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — May 20, 2016 @ 4:10 pm

    • I’ve never figured out exactly what the “false” means. There are severl flowers that have that in their names. They’re pretty anyway.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — May 20, 2016 @ 6:31 pm

  10. Very interesting – never seen one.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — May 25, 2016 @ 11:10 pm

    • They are quite common in this mountain area. I don’t know exactly what their range is.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 26, 2016 @ 9:07 am


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