Montana Outdoors

April 24, 2016

Aging beautifully

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , , — montucky @ 2:57 pm

Western White Trillium

Western White Trillium

Western White Trillium

The blossoms of the Trillium ovatum (which first bloom in white) turn to pink and then purple as they age.

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23 Comments »

  1. Interesting. I didn’t know they did that. Our purple trilliums have just started blooming.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — April 24, 2016 @ 3:08 pm

    • When I first saw our Trilliums I thought they were two different species and then I found that with this species it’s a matter of age.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 24, 2016 @ 7:07 pm

  2. I didn’t know that (either).
    Lovely shots, especially the last one. The flower almost looks translucent, or is that just the rain drops?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — April 24, 2016 @ 3:15 pm

    • The older blossoms are translucent when they are wet. I’ve not noticed that with the new ones.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 24, 2016 @ 7:08 pm

  3. Great detail. The last flower looks almost transparent in places.

    Like

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — April 24, 2016 @ 3:25 pm

  4. Of course LOVELY AGEING! Thanks and congrats.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — April 24, 2016 @ 5:42 pm

  5. Nice photo of a very delicate flower. Are they short-lived?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by iAMsafari.com — April 24, 2016 @ 6:53 pm

  6. That’s interesting, about the translucence. I just learned about an Asian plant called the skeleton flower, that becomes transparent when wet. Then, when it dries, it goes back to being white. I’m not sure what the purpose of that particular evolutionary trait is, but it’s really cool.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — April 24, 2016 @ 8:50 pm

    • These will also lose their transparency when they dry. I think it is caused simply from the fragility of the aged petals.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 24, 2016 @ 9:47 pm

  7. Interesting re: the translucence. And the color change.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — April 24, 2016 @ 8:59 pm

    • I would like to understand the strategy involved with the color change. Whatever it is it must be successful because Trilliums are very plentiful.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 24, 2016 @ 9:48 pm

  8. There’s a deep lesson in here! Beautiful photos. Trilliums are exquisite.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — April 26, 2016 @ 1:51 am

  9. Very interesting study. I love the idea and Your photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — April 27, 2016 @ 12:36 am

  10. I agree, aging beautifully.
    Must head into the mountains after seeing these.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — May 1, 2016 @ 12:20 pm

    • It might not be too late yet in your area. They are really pretty to see!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 1, 2016 @ 2:08 pm


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