Montana Outdoors

April 20, 2016

Fairy slipper

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , , , — montucky @ 9:16 pm

Fairyslipper

The Fairy slipper is a very fragile little orchid that ranges through the western and northern tier of states in the U.S. Its bulbs are attached by very delicate roots that are easily broken by the lightest tug on the stem and so if one is picked or the stem is disturbed the whole plant usually dies. It also grows in association with certain specific fungi which makes it all but impossible to transplant. “Calypso” is an orchid genus containing only a single species, Calypso Bulbosa.

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26 Comments »

  1. Yet another lovely creation of nature. Thanks and congrats.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — April 20, 2016 @ 10:10 pm

    • It is indeed. There are so many species of wildflowers that grow in very specific locations and conditions and provide so much beauty!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 20, 2016 @ 10:19 pm

  2. Such a beauty!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — April 20, 2016 @ 11:18 pm

  3. What a beauty. It looks so fragile and delicate.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — April 21, 2016 @ 5:26 am

    • And shy. They grow in shady places near the edges of the forest and are often down in taller grasses and shrubs. That may be also because the ones that grow where there may be any foot traffic, from man or animal, may have been destroyed.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2016 @ 7:40 am

  4. That is exquisite! And how fragile!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Jo Woolf — April 21, 2016 @ 5:34 am

    • Very fragile, and yet the species is considered to be in no danger and plentiful mainly I suppose because of it’s habit of growing back in underbrush under the trees where there is typically no traffic.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2016 @ 7:43 am

  5. It really is amazing that plucking the blossom causes the entire plant to die. That takes delicate to an entirely new level, doesn’t it?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — April 21, 2016 @ 7:01 am

    • It’s the most delicate that I know of. That, coupled with its dependence on certain fungi would, I would think, make it very rare; however it is considered plentiful across its range.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2016 @ 7:45 am

  6. That’s stunning!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Val — April 21, 2016 @ 7:22 am

  7. What a beauty–so delicate.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sue — April 21, 2016 @ 10:16 am

  8. This beautiful orchid is also called Calypso borealis. It is the one that John Muir slogged through a swamp to find, and it’s easy to see why. When he found it he said that he sat down beside it and “fairly wept with joy.”
    It’s a very special flower and you’re so lucky to have found it!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — April 21, 2016 @ 3:13 pm

  9. I love the John Muir story above …. it is a wondrous little thing ….

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — April 23, 2016 @ 8:12 pm

    • I was very pleased to read that comment: I understand the feeling.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 23, 2016 @ 9:08 pm

  10. such a dear portrait
    of this lovely fairy slipper

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — April 23, 2016 @ 8:28 pm

  11. They are gorgeous little beings: I wonder how many people notice them.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — April 23, 2016 @ 9:10 pm

  12. It’s fortunate that it grows in out-of-the-way places where it is probably seldom seen by humans.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — April 24, 2016 @ 8:50 pm

  13. So adorable!

    Like

    Comment by Brenda Davis Harsham — May 20, 2016 @ 7:50 pm


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