Montana Outdoors

April 11, 2016

Arrow-leaved Balsamroot

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , , — montucky @ 8:50 pm

In just the last few days the Arrow-leaved Balsamroot (Balsamorhiza sagittata) have begun to bloom.

Arrow-leaved Balsamroot

Arrow-leaved Balsamroot

Arrow-leaved Balsamroot

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24 Comments »

  1. Lovely gift of nature presented beautifully to the viewers of your nice blog. Thanks aplenty. Congrats.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by nvsubbaraman — April 11, 2016 @ 9:37 pm

  2. Hi Montucky, They are quite pretty. Nicely photographed. Brightened my day seeing them! Thanks for sharing the beauty. Have a great day tomorrow!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — April 11, 2016 @ 9:44 pm

    • Thanks wildlifewatcher! They are in the sunflower family and the blossoms are quite large. When they bloom the brighten whole hillsides.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 11, 2016 @ 10:22 pm

  3. Suddenly you have a lot of flowers happening! Very nice.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — April 11, 2016 @ 11:32 pm

    • We do! There has been about a week of warm, sunny weather and the landscape has changed dramatically. Now we have some rain coming up for which the timing is perfect.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 12, 2016 @ 8:02 am

  4. That’s one I’ve never seen. They must put on quite a show when there are large groups of them.

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    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — April 12, 2016 @ 2:53 am

    • Yes, they are spectacular when they bloom. There is a large hillside beside my house and it all lights up because those flowers are very large.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — April 12, 2016 @ 8:04 am

  5. Those are quite pretty! They remind me of sunflowers. 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — April 12, 2016 @ 6:51 am

    • They are in the sunflower family, but don’t grow on long stalks. Their roots are tuberous and nourishing.

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      Comment by montucky — April 12, 2016 @ 8:05 am

  6. quite beautiful
    also looks like life is eating it, taking it’s pollen, all is well in the world of insects and flowers.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — April 12, 2016 @ 8:48 am

    • Looks like spring is now in high gear. I’m seeing an extraordinary number of insects so far and the first hummingbirds have arrived just this last week.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 12, 2016 @ 9:11 am

  7. Yours have shorter, wider petals than ours do. Very cool.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Harold Rhenisch — April 12, 2016 @ 10:28 am

    • The difference may just be that these in the photos are the first to bloom and sometimes they are smaller. They sure brighten up the hillsides though, don’t they!

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      Comment by montucky — April 12, 2016 @ 12:49 pm

  8. I love colonies of flowers, and these appear to be spectacular. Is the white fuzziness in the last photo a part of the plant, or something else, like spider web?

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    Comment by shoreacres — April 12, 2016 @ 8:59 pm

    • I think the fuzzies are the start of more new buds that will open in several more days. The Arrowleaf will sometimes cover whole hillsides with their large blossoms. Their roots are tuberous and the Indians in this area valued them very much as a food source, somewhat similar to potatoes.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 12, 2016 @ 9:57 pm

  9. I love Your nature study. Beautiful photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sartenada — April 12, 2016 @ 11:59 pm

    • Thank you! These are probably the largest of our wildflowers and they bloom in profusion. Everyone looks forward to seeing them each year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 13, 2016 @ 2:31 pm

  10. I saw my first group of these yesterday. They had a faint but lovely scent. They looked a little different from your lovely portraits. Perhaps in a different stage or different variety.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Tammie — April 17, 2016 @ 4:31 pm

    • The ones in your area probably have not reached full maturity yet and these had a head start. I’m always amazed at their growth rate in spring. Seems like they just pop up and bloom quickly this time of year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 17, 2016 @ 6:25 pm

  11. I was going to ask if they’re in the sunflower family but you already stated that. There sure are a lot of similar looking flowers in that family, I can’t differentiate them well.

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    Comment by Candace — April 18, 2016 @ 5:59 pm

    • The sunflower family is huge and some of the plants are surprising. These are easily identified by their size, their leaves and the way they grow in big bouquets. I will try to remember this summer to try eating the roots: they are supposed to be quite good.

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      Comment by montucky — April 18, 2016 @ 8:02 pm


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