Montana Outdoors

March 28, 2016

Surprising to see these in bloom so early

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , , — montucky @ 4:33 pm

Kinnikinnik

Kinnikinnik ~ Arctostaphylos uva-ursi

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17 Comments »

  1. It will be an interesting summer.

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    Comment by rhenisch@telus.net — March 28, 2016 @ 5:07 pm

    • Yes it will be. I’m hoping that our snow pack is as dense as I think it is.

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      Comment by montucky — March 28, 2016 @ 6:54 pm

  2. I agree with rhenisch. It will be interesting to see if flowers bloom early, late or whatever (with the unpredictable seasonal weather we’ve been experiencing all over the world).

    The first part of our Autumn was very hot. Now this week, being the end of March, it’s cold like winter. And so few Autumn leaves on the paths around this area.

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    Comment by Vicki — March 28, 2016 @ 5:45 pm

    • So far the early-blooming wildflowers here are just about on their normal schedule. There is dry weather forecast for the next week and some sun so it will be interesting to track the next bloomers.

      Does it appear then that your fall colors will be less than usual?

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      Comment by montucky — March 28, 2016 @ 6:57 pm

  3. There’s that wonderful name, again. I remembered it was Indian, but I couldn’t remember the tribe. I looked it up, and found it’s Algonquin. I was surprised to learn the plant is in the manzanita family, too. Besides all that interesting information, it’s a very pretty flower. One article mentioned that it’s evergreen — is that true in your area?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — March 28, 2016 @ 6:34 pm

    • Yes, it’s evergreen here. It was one of the first plants in which I became interested, probably because of my Father’s influence. The berries are edible and nourishing, although quite tasteless. I’ve found them often in the crops of grouse and I’m sure that other wildlife also eat them. It doesn’t appear that the ungulates eat the leaves though, or at least I’ve never noticed bite marks on them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 28, 2016 @ 7:04 pm

  4. Yay! Spring is coming.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — March 28, 2016 @ 7:36 pm

  5. Beautiful. Yes indeed, spring is coming there and here, but much slowly, because Lake Saimaa has ice cover yet.

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    Comment by Sartenada — March 29, 2016 @ 2:23 am

    • Here we are expecting at least a week of sun and clear skies, just in time for the early wildflowers to start blooming (I hope).

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      Comment by montucky — March 29, 2016 @ 8:36 am

  6. I love these little beauties … they seem magical almost to me, from another world.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — March 29, 2016 @ 9:00 am

    • I’ve always loved this plant too. It’s pretty, and beneficial and seems friendly on the mountainsides.

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      Comment by montucky — March 29, 2016 @ 9:30 am

  7. Love that name, very lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — March 29, 2016 @ 3:13 pm

    • I do too. It caught my imagination when I was just a child.

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      Comment by montucky — March 29, 2016 @ 7:33 pm

  8. I have never seen this flower, precious little natural jewels. Great picture.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by isathreadsoflife — April 2, 2016 @ 1:02 pm

    • The plant is plentiful here, especially at the mid to high elevations, but the flowers are very small: this group was only about 1/4 inch across.

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      Comment by montucky — April 2, 2016 @ 8:05 pm


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