Montana Outdoors

March 6, 2016

Late winter ~ late summer

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 8:26 pm

Great Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) in early March:

Great Mullein In March

Great Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) in late September:

Great Mullein in September

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21 Comments »

  1. Seems we have a while to wait for this one. But soon the greenery will start to show.

    Like

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — March 6, 2016 @ 9:23 pm

    • Yes. There are lots of new shoots coming up here, tulips and daffodils and there are two crocus starting to show colors.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 6, 2016 @ 9:36 pm

  2. The top one looks like a pastoral Crosier.

    David.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by David A Lockwood — March 7, 2016 @ 12:55 am

  3. I’ve noticed that some plants are just as beautiful in winter as they are when they’re blooming!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — March 7, 2016 @ 3:51 am

  4. Wow! Gorgeous photos, as usual. Spring is very welcome! Incidentally, I know that you have sweet vernal grass there (Draba verna), and I am doing a research project on it–if you would be willing to collect seeds if you see it, I would be very grateful. I first found your site looking for photos of it, and became an instant total fan of your photography since then. My contact is jgurevitch@optonline.net

    Like

    Comment by jpostol — March 7, 2016 @ 8:21 am

    • Thanks jpostal! Spring is developing quickly here now. After I saw your comment I took a walk down toward the river and (your timing was perfect) saw a patch of Draba verna in bloom and got a couple of photos and posted them to Flickr. I’d be very pleased to help with your research project! I’m sending you an email.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 7, 2016 @ 8:31 pm

      • That’s wonderful, thanks so much–I was very excited to see the photos today on your blog. I love those cute little things–you have to look closely to appreciate them, and your lens opens that up to everyone.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by jpostol — March 8, 2016 @ 5:48 am

        • That’s just part of the passion I have for wildflowers: many are so tiny and intricate and beautiful that it takes a good lens and a lot of patience to really get to see their beauty.

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          Comment by montucky — March 8, 2016 @ 10:10 am

  5. Wow, what a difference a couple seasons makes!

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Candace — March 8, 2016 @ 8:43 am

    • Yes, the transformations are surprising and amazing. I have been able to document that variation in only a few.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — March 8, 2016 @ 10:12 am

  6. The name seemed familiar, but I see that it’s here in Texas as introduced/invasive. On the other hand, on a Texas ag site, I found this about the uses of the plant: “The leaves have been used to treat colds, sore throat, scratches and asthma. Dried stalks have been dipped in wax to be used as candles and the yellow flower has been used as wool dye.” Quite useful, I’d say. I love the first photo. I’m becoming increasingly fond of the latter stages of plant life. They do have their own kind of beauty.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by shoreacres — March 8, 2016 @ 11:28 am

    • The curled plant in the first photo appeared one morning in a dense fog off the river. Couldn’t resist a shot of it. Mullein is far from my favorite plant, but I love its flowers.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 8, 2016 @ 12:03 pm

  7. What a striking photo that 1st one is.
    With the overcast background, the whole image begins to be almost contemporary.

    (just catching up with posts – have been off the computer for a few days).

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Vicki — March 8, 2016 @ 10:34 pm

  8. The detail on the yellow flowers is amazing. Awesome shot!

    Like

    Comment by Jane — March 9, 2016 @ 3:59 am

  9. Your photos just prove to us how amazing the change of season is, don’t they? That reawakening of all those beautiful plants that went dormant for a time.

    Like

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — March 11, 2016 @ 9:37 am

    • The new life in the spring is awesome, year after year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — March 11, 2016 @ 9:57 pm

  10. Difference is huge. Thank You for this interesting comparation.

    Like

    Comment by Sartenada — March 15, 2016 @ 3:26 am


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