Montana Outdoors

June 27, 2015

Friday’s wildflowers

Harebells

Harebells ~ Campanula rotundifolia

Harebells

Harebells ~ Campanula rotundifolia

Pearly Everlasting

Pearly Everlasting ~ Anaphalis margaritacea

Oxeye Daisy

Oxeye Daisy ~ Leucanthemum vulgare

Oxeye Daisy

Oxeye Daisy ~ Leucanthemum vulgare

Pipsissewa, common prince's-pine

Pipsissewa, common prince’s-pine ~ Chimaphila umbellata

Pipsissewa, common prince's-pine

Pipsissewa, common prince’s-pine ~ Chimaphila umbellata

Nodding onion

Nodding onion ~ Allium cernuum

Nodding onion

Nodding onion ~ Allium cernuum

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28 Comments »

  1. Those of us with cats find it hard not to think of hairballs when we see harebells. That’s too bad, because harebells are nice to see.

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    Comment by Malcolm R. Campbell — June 27, 2015 @ 11:45 am

    • I found this on the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center website: “The name Harebell may allude to an association with witches, who were believed able to transform themselves into hares, portents of bad luck when they crossed a persons path.”

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      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2015 @ 11:52 am

  2. Beautiful images, Terry…well done. Those Pearly Everlastings remind me of my old stompin’ grounds up north….used to find them off-trail up there….

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    Comment by seekraz — June 27, 2015 @ 11:48 am

    • Thanks Scott. They are very common here too, and always a welcome sight. They also do well in dried flower bouquets.

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      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2015 @ 11:54 am

      • You’re welcome…and I can imagine that they do very well in dried flower bouquets…I’ve seen them in their “off season” out in the hills and can picture them nicely in an arrangement indoors.

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        Comment by seekraz — June 27, 2015 @ 12:18 pm

  3. Nice shot of the pipsissewa. Did you have to lay on the ground and shoot upwards?

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    Comment by jomegat — June 27, 2015 @ 11:52 am

    • I did. They are very shy, aren’t they!

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      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2015 @ 11:54 am

      • Indeed they are! I find they are one of the more difficult flowers to photograph.

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        Comment by jomegat — June 27, 2015 @ 4:10 pm

  4. Nodding onion are amazing. Always love pearly e. Thanks. L

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    Comment by Lynn Millar — June 27, 2015 @ 12:15 pm

    • Nodding onions are really onions, too. All parts of the plant smell like onions and the bulbs of the plant have the onion taste.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2015 @ 12:41 pm

  5. The nodding onions are pretty and I see from your comment about that they are really onions and edible. Harebells don’t look much like hairballs, though.

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    Comment by Candace — June 27, 2015 @ 1:05 pm

    • I think Harebells deserve a name with better connotations.

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      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2015 @ 1:21 pm

  6. Because they’re usually quite small, these beautiful flowers are often missed. I especially love the pearly everlasting. We find it near the fireweed after a forest fire and it makes a bright border against the pink. I say border because it often grows at the edge of the logging roads almost like a mini hedge and is shorter than the fireweed.

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    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 27, 2015 @ 1:16 pm

    • Yes, pearly everlasting does like to get sun and seems to especially like the open edges of the forest or places like roads that have open spaces.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2015 @ 1:23 pm

  7. More delicate delights from Montana. They are beautiful, especially the Pipsissewa. I love the close-up of that one. šŸ™‚

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    Comment by Jane — June 27, 2015 @ 1:41 pm

    • That’s a very “shy” flower. The face is always facing the ground and so it is difficult to photograph it as it grows. Reminds me of a special kind of candy.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2015 @ 3:18 pm

  8. I’m familiar with all of these except the nodding onion. I saw shinleaf (Pyrola elliptica) blooming the other day but your pipsissewa is ahead of ours, which are just showing buds. Great shot of the flower. I know what you had to go through to get it!

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    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 27, 2015 @ 2:56 pm

    • I guess the onion doesn’t make it up your way. It has a rather strange distribution!
      While this has been a poor year for nearly all of our wild flowers, the pipsissewa is abundant. I don’t understand!

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      Comment by montucky — June 27, 2015 @ 3:23 pm

      • If you go by its fleshy leaves the pipsissewa could almost be considered a succulent. Maybe it doesn’t need as much water as our other native wintergreens.

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        Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 27, 2015 @ 3:26 pm

        • It does like to grow in moist areas, but also in the shade. It might just like the heat and blooms before the forest floor dries out too much. Sure is a bumper crop this year though!

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          Comment by montucky — June 27, 2015 @ 8:31 pm

  9. I looked up harebells, myself. I found that they’re also the bluebell of Scotland, and that they provided the blue dye for the MacDonald clan. And of course I found another author affirming the source of our name for them: “The common name of harebell alludes to the folk beliefs that it either grew in places frequented by hares or that witches used juices squeezed from this flower to transform themselves into hares.” Hmmmm…..

    The pearly everlasting look like old-fashioned straw flowers. And as pretty as Pipsissewa is, I love saying the name.

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    Comment by shoreacres — June 28, 2015 @ 8:55 am

    • Harebells are high on my list of favorite flowers. Once they start to bloom they will continue until the snow flies, and they grow at just about all elevations and in many different types of habitat. The “bells” will face up, or down, or sideways, nearly always are present on groups of blossoms and provide all kinds of different “looks”. One of the most pleasant of all wildflowers.

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      Comment by montucky — June 28, 2015 @ 9:23 am

  10. Outstanding! I will never tire of your wonderful photography.

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    Comment by WildBill — June 29, 2015 @ 5:44 am

  11. Very enjoyable post. Some of those wild flowers are in Finland also.

    Like

    Comment by Sartenada — July 7, 2015 @ 12:48 am


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