Montana Outdoors

June 16, 2015

Revett Lake ~ 2015

Filed under: Idaho — Tags: , , — montucky @ 6:48 pm

When I visited Revett Lake in late summer of 2014 the tall stalks of Bear Grass flowers could be seen in vast quantities on the seep mountainside on the far side of the lake, although the flowers were already gone. I made a note then to return this year during the time that they would be blooming because it would be a magnificent sight. Well, today I paid another visit and although the Bear Grass is in bloom, they are very sparse compared to normal years and the spectacle I had anticipated was not there. It’s still a nice hike and a beautiful lake, and following are a series of photos of the trail and the lake, starting with a early morning view from just past the trail head looking farther back into the Idaho Panhandle National Forest.

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake trail

Revett Lake

Revett Lake

Revett Lake

Revett Lake

Revett Lake

Revett Lake

Revett Lake

Revett Lake

Revett Lake trail

Revett is located just on the Idaho side of the Montana/Idaho border at Thompson Pass, about 24 miles west of Thompson Falls, Montana. There road to the trail head takes off at the large parking area at Thompson Pass which is also the trail head for Blossom lakes on the Montana side.

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24 Comments »

  1. Beautiful country.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Malcolm R. Campbell — June 16, 2015 @ 7:30 pm

  2. I really like the stone shapes and formations.

    Like

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 16, 2015 @ 7:54 pm

    • They are always fascinating, as are the plants that figure out how to grow on them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 16, 2015 @ 8:18 pm

  3. I love so much about the scenery of Montana…your mountains, tall green forests, wildflowers, mossescreeks, waterfalls and lakes. It is an incredibly beautiful part of the world. I particularly like the lake reflection pictures but they are all wonderful, Terry.

    Like

    Comment by Jane — June 16, 2015 @ 11:36 pm

    • I’m glad that you enjoy the scenes, Jane because I think it is a beautiful place too. I wish you could experience the rest of the trip too, especially the solitude, knowing that there is no one else around for miles and the feeling of existing in a place that is the same as it was thousands of years ago, blending in and feeling at home there.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 17, 2015 @ 9:04 pm

  4. So beautiful – that lake looks cool and refreshing, and I can almost smell the air! I never tire of seeing your beautiful landscapes.

    Like

    Comment by Jo Woolf — June 17, 2015 @ 2:47 am

    • Yes, the lake water is very cold and the air very pure. This particular lake is not as remote as some, but I saw no one else on the trail all day and the area hasn’t been too badly abused. The lakes further back into the wilderness are pristine.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 17, 2015 @ 9:12 pm

  5. It’s a beautiful place, with or without the bear grass. The ledges make it look a lot like our granite quarries but I doubt much stone quarrying went on way up there.

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    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 17, 2015 @ 3:30 am

    • Those are natural rock ledges, what remains after the glaciers carved out the cirque in which the lake sits. There is a peak to the left and behind where the photos were taken from. I couldn’t get a shot of it because the sun was coming up from that direction, but it is called “Granite Peak”.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 17, 2015 @ 9:14 pm

  6. There’s nothing quite like that blue and green to remind us just how beautiful this world is … wonderful photos … that trail …

    Like

    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — June 17, 2015 @ 4:42 am

    • Places like that are the link that connects us to the world the way it has always been, before we “civilized” people tampered with it. The natural Earth was and is a very good and beautiful place. I wish i could think that we have been good stewards of it, but that is not true. I hope that some day we will begin to understand the philosophies of those who were indigenous to this place which held the earth in reverence and viewed her with respect.

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      Comment by montucky — June 17, 2015 @ 9:22 pm

  7. Beautiful scenic hike! I really enjoy going “with” you on these adventures. Did I tell you my daughter and son-in-law climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro in January? Their trek to the summit (over 19,000 ft) was amazing. Now that they have that under their belts, they want to go to the highest point in each state in the US.

    Like

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — June 17, 2015 @ 8:00 am

    • Yes I remember your kids trip. That would have been amazing! I can clearly understand why there are folks who really love those treks!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 17, 2015 @ 9:24 pm

  8. There simply is no way to choose a favorite, but there is one little detail that tickled me. In the sixth photo, the first one with the bear grass, I love the curve in that tree trunk. That’s so unusual, the way it curves out and then up. The way the light plays on the trees in the next-to-last photo is pretty special, too. Gosh, I wish I could see it in real time!

    Like

    Comment by shoreacres — June 17, 2015 @ 5:21 pm

    • I’m sure there was a story involved with the way that tree trunk grew and I’d bet, from seeing where it is located, that it involved an avalanche in one of the tree’s younger years.
      The light on those trees was beautiful. The morning sun was just reaching that end of the lake and it felt rather good too. Time and temperature and climate are different in those high cirque areas. I wish you could see some of these places too. After you went on a few excursions, you would probably be in the same fix that I am in where I just can’t get enough of those places. Sometimes I will bet well off the trail and just lie down on a grassy hillside of on the fallen needles of a large conifer and just BE there.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 17, 2015 @ 9:35 pm

  9. So very beautiful, Terry…..and no, just can’t get enough…..

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    Comment by seekraz — June 18, 2015 @ 7:41 am

    • We have been lucky to live at a time when this kind of place still exists and is relatively undamaged by exploiters, developers and those who ride their thrill machines all over the back country. We may be one of the last generations to see such places.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 18, 2015 @ 7:59 am

  10. Hi Montucky, Splendid-looking place. Love the scenery. Your photographs are excellent! Have a great day today!

    Like

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — June 19, 2015 @ 10:55 am

  11. Sp pristine and pure. I wonder if the bear grass will proliferate as the summer continues?

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    Comment by Candace — June 20, 2015 @ 5:56 pm

    • The bear grass is about at its peak for this year, and its numbers were few. The flowers come from off-shoot plants, which then die after flowering. Each plant flowers only every 5 to 10 years, and so there are very good years and some pretty bad years for them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 20, 2015 @ 8:11 pm

  12. I think that I remember Your earlier photos from this area. Because I have no idea, I ask if there are any blueberries on this area?

    Like

    Comment by Sartenada — June 24, 2015 @ 3:50 am

    • There are not wild blueberries, but there is a close relative, huckleberries. They will be starting to ripen soon, and the bears will feast on them!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — June 24, 2015 @ 7:23 am


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