Montana Outdoors

October 18, 2014

Cabinet Wilderness trail 656 part 3. Lost Buck Pass

Another mile and a half on the trail past Upper Geiger Lake is Lost Buck Pass which crosses the Cabinet Divide just below Carney Peak, at an elevation of about 6,000 feet. Looking east from the pass you can see Upper Geiger Lake and beyond, the Vermilion River watershed. The view to the west includes Wanless Lake, Engle Peak, and Goat Peak. To the south you look down the entire length of the Swamp Creek drainage and the Clark Fork River can be dimly seen far in the distance.

Lost Buck Pass

Lost Buck Pass

Lost Buck Pass

Wanless Lake

Wanless Lake

Wanless Lake

Buck Lake

Buck Lake

Lost Buck Pass

Wanless Lake

Grom Lost Buck Pass

Lost Buck Pass

Lost Buck Pass

Lost Buck Pass

Lost Buck Pass

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36 Comments »

  1. I am speechless.. Beautiful country!

    Like

    Comment by Mother Hen — October 18, 2014 @ 9:51 pm

  2. I like these views, the perspective they show. And, as always, I like the trees at the high elevations, living and dead.

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    Comment by Malcolm R. Campbell — October 18, 2014 @ 11:46 pm

    • Yes, the trees. Think of the things they have seen; the wildlife dramas, the wonder of the wind and the magnificent storms that were driven by it. Things that I would love to see too.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 18, 2014 @ 11:53 pm

  3. Absolutely stunning. I love the lake, and all the colours of blue/green, with the little patch of lying snow. Have you had any more snow on the mountains yet?

    Like

    Comment by Jo Woolf — October 19, 2014 @ 1:55 am

    • No more new snow yet. We have been having a long, warm “Indian summer”. It is slowly cooling off though and we should start seeing snow soon in the higher places.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 19, 2014 @ 8:17 am

  4. Looking at our beautiful shots I definitely wasn’t in Ohio any more!

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    Comment by centralohionature — October 19, 2014 @ 4:06 am

    • I know how different it is from the less mountainous areas. Folks can drive around this particular wilderness and still not see what it is like. I’ve been surprised to find so few Montana natives who have seen more than the tall peaks from a distance. It has so much more inside it.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 19, 2014 @ 8:28 am

  5. Absolutely gorgeous!

    Like

    Comment by derrycats — October 19, 2014 @ 4:29 am

  6. My favorite of this group is the one showing the tree paralleling the lines of the mountains. By their nature, the mountains communicate a sense of solidity, but that photo seems filled with movement — I suppose it’s the different lines, and the great pairing.

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    Comment by shoreacres — October 19, 2014 @ 5:46 am

    • It almost seems as if that tree is symbolically trying to protect its mountain home. I could (and perhaps some time I will) spend days there studying the rocks and the trees that make up the ecology of that place. I would just love to be there during stormy weather and experience the winds that must blow through that pass and probably cause many of the trees to look the way they do.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 19, 2014 @ 8:34 am

  7. Majestic and breathtaking are words that come to mind when I look at these shots. It’s not hard to tell the direction of the prevailing winds when seeing some of those trees! Such strong roots they have to have to be able to stand against it. I’d love to spend a month or two exploring there.

    Like

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — October 19, 2014 @ 6:14 am

    • I’d like to do that too. There is an excellent place to camp at the upper lake that would make a great base camp and from there to the pass is only about a mile and a half.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 19, 2014 @ 8:38 am

  8. When I saw the rocky trail I wondered how many grizzlies have walked up it, taking the easier way up the hill.

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    Comment by wordsfromanneli — October 19, 2014 @ 12:18 pm

    • I would guess a lot have. There were deer, elk and moose tracks but the trail was too hard and rocky to see those of the softer-footed critters. I did get to see a mink though.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 19, 2014 @ 9:45 pm

      • Wouldn’t it be fantastic to be able to see what goes on there when we’re not around?

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        Comment by wordsfromanneli — October 20, 2014 @ 10:08 am

        • If it wasn’t a 4 hour hike to get up there, one could set up a trail camera. I bet that would be interesting.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — October 20, 2014 @ 10:33 am

  9. Love the photos and the sweeping views…What a wonderful hike.

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    Comment by Charlie@Seattle Trekker — October 19, 2014 @ 1:13 pm

    • That sure was a wonderful hike, one that I will not hesitate to go on again, possibly earlier in the year, although the thought of seeing that area under a coat of snow is very tempting.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 19, 2014 @ 9:46 pm

  10. Hi Montucky, My choice for the best of today’s pictures is the one where there are a group of snags on the edge. Have a pleasant coming week!

    Like

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — October 19, 2014 @ 4:28 pm

    • Those old snags are haunting me too. I wonder what happened. There is a young one coming up again there too. That’s a real vantage point.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 19, 2014 @ 9:48 pm

  11. Wonderful!

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    Comment by seekraz — October 20, 2014 @ 7:35 am

    • Another place I’m sure you would love!

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      Comment by montucky — October 20, 2014 @ 8:16 am

      • Absolutely, Terry…I miss the mountains incredibly. I would LOVE to go hiking there. 🙂

        Like

        Comment by seekraz — October 20, 2014 @ 9:17 am

  12. Beautiful calendar photos!

    Like

    Comment by Sue — October 20, 2014 @ 1:36 pm

  13. I think that others said it before me: gorgeous, stunning!

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    Comment by Sartenada — October 23, 2014 @ 2:46 am

    • Yes, it’s a wonderful place and the “wilderness” designation means that it will always be protected. The ruggedness means that it will not receive a lot of visitors except near the edges.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 23, 2014 @ 8:42 am

  14. Beautiful! That lake is gorgeous from any viewpoint.

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    Comment by Candace — October 23, 2014 @ 8:33 pm

    • It sure is. Next summer I plan to spend a night or two on the ridge from where the photo was taken. Wanless Lake would be nice to see at different times of the day.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 23, 2014 @ 8:49 pm

  15. Gorgeous country and breathtaking view!

    Like

    Comment by Lucy — October 24, 2014 @ 3:34 pm

    • I visited that Wilderness for the first time a little over a year ago and fell in love with it. I’ve made hikes into it now 7 times and have more planned for next summer.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — October 24, 2014 @ 7:18 pm

      • That’s wonderful to hear. Don’t stop. It’s so worth it! Nothing like mother nature to make your day.

        Like

        Comment by Lucy — October 25, 2014 @ 2:48 am

        • Nature can be very harsh, and yet being very close to it is calming and reassuring. It is the ultimate reality.

          Liked by 1 person

          Comment by montucky — October 25, 2014 @ 9:05 am


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