Montana Outdoors

October 13, 2014

Cabinet Wilderness trail 656 part 2.

A mile or so and another 600 feet in elevation above Lower geiger Lake sits Upper Geiger Lake. To visit the lake itself you can take a short trail off 656 for about a half mile (the Wilderness map calls it trail # 48 but there’s no sign for it so I wonder why they bothered numbering it). There is a sign at the junction with an arrow pointing toward the lake. It’s well worth the short side trip.

Upper Geiger is smaller than the lower lake, but lots of folks get tired by the time they reach the lower one and so Upper Geiger receives far fewer visitors. You can tell by the signs of use on the trail. The gap that is visible in the cliffs and mountainside at the far end of the lake is Lost Buck Pass and the last three photos were taken from there.

Upper Geiger Lake

Upper Geiger Lake

Upper Geiger Lake

Upper Geiger Lake

At Upper Geiger Lake

Trail 656 between Upper and Lower Geiger Lakes

Trail 656 between Upper Geiger Lake and Lost Buck Pass

Trail 656 between Upper Geiger Lake and Lost Buck Pass

Upper Geiger Lake

Upper Geiger Lake

Upper Geiger Lake

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35 Comments »

  1. Well worth the walk. I suspect few people take this hike every year because they have no idea the trail exists.

    Like

    Comment by Malcolm R. Campbell — October 13, 2014 @ 10:40 pm

    • I think a lot more people know about it than hike it, but it can be a little difficult to find after the lower lake and it could be a bit intimidating to an inexperienced hiker.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — October 13, 2014 @ 10:56 pm

  2. All of the elements that remind me why I love to hike…The photos are absolutely wonderful.

    Like

    Comment by Charlie@Seattle Trekker — October 13, 2014 @ 11:32 pm

    • Yup. You don’t have to visit too many places like that to fall in love with the wild country!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 14, 2014 @ 8:21 am

  3. Spectacular! That lake is just magnificent. Is this a glacial lake, carved by glaciers, and therefore quite deep?

    Like

    Comment by Jo Woolf — October 14, 2014 @ 1:36 am

    • To the best of my limited knowledge, these are both cirque lakes, formed by glaciers. I haven’t found much information about their depth, but their waters are very clear and looking down into them they appear to be quite deep. I know that many have good trout populations that have room to survive beneath the deep ice that forms on them at those altitudes.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 14, 2014 @ 8:24 am

  4. Such gorgeous country to hike in … I can only imagine how wonderful it is to be standing above that lake with that view … lucky, lucky you … 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — October 14, 2014 @ 4:11 am

    • I wish you could experience that in person, Teresa! I have never been able to get enough of it.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 14, 2014 @ 8:25 am

  5. It’s such an incredibly beautiful place. I think you could spend a lifetime exploring just this one area by the looks, and all that loose stone would make me start with mineral hunting. It’s nice to know that places like this still exist, even if I probably will never visit them.

    Like

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — October 14, 2014 @ 5:26 am

    • I think you’re right, you could easily spend a lifetime exploring such areas. I’ve now made 7 trips into the Cabinet Wilderness and have many more on my list to visit, and that area is only 147 square miles. There are many other areas like it, just in western Montana which really need the protection of wilderness designation.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — October 14, 2014 @ 8:29 am

  6. I want to start hiking a lot more. Your posts sure inspire me. Beautiful images.

    I would love to get out to your part of the country!

    Like

    Comment by Boyd Greene Fine Art — October 14, 2014 @ 6:16 am

    • Visiting places like that is sure good for the soul! I have several friend with whom I like to hike, but I also love to hike alone with the thoughts and feelings that come with being in the wilderness.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by montucky — October 14, 2014 @ 8:32 am

  7. Beautiful area!

    Like

    Comment by centralohionature — October 14, 2014 @ 6:40 am

    • The day of that hike we spent 8 hours on the trail and every second was filled with natural beauty. And admission is free!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 14, 2014 @ 8:34 am

  8. Just plain-old beautiful, Terry…stone beautiful…..

    Like

    Comment by seekraz — October 14, 2014 @ 7:31 am

  9. I can just imagine the fresh clean air!

    Like

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — October 14, 2014 @ 8:29 am

  10. Your photos from this stunning landscape is breathtaking … Is there the same kind of landscape in Wyoming, Oregon … Or is Montana the last wilderness in the US ? … // Maria 🙂

    Like

    Comment by mariayarri — October 14, 2014 @ 6:36 pm

    • Thanks Maria! No, Montana is not the last of the wilderness. I’m not very familiar with Wyoming or any of the states east of there, but I know there is a great deal of wilderness in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Colorado and Arizona. The American west is a huge place.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 14, 2014 @ 8:05 pm

  11. Those photos looking down on the lake are so beautiful. And I really enjoyed the inclusion of the compass photo. It was like a wink and a nudge that said, “Remember. These views don’t just happen. It does take a little bit to get there!”

    Like

    Comment by shoreacres — October 15, 2014 @ 4:48 am

    • I know that there a few people at least who live in this general area and will use some of my posts for information about these areas. It might be important to them to know how much “up” there is on the trails and what the actual elevation is. Those are two things that I consider critical when I research an area into which I intend to hike. If you’re going to climb close to three thousand feet, you should take along an extra thousand calories because that’s about what you will use up, and those who are accustomed to exerting at an elevation of two thousand feet will find that exerting at six thousand feet is entirely different. The trail head here was about 3,700 feet and the pass, 6,000 feet. Also, this time of year you have to think about potential snow levels at higher elevations and be prepared. There’s a lot to proper preparation!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 15, 2014 @ 8:10 am

  12. Beautiful! Another place that you have almost all to yourself. Looks so pure and clean.

    Like

    Comment by Candace — October 15, 2014 @ 12:00 pm

    • We did have this lake all to ourselves. I think these steep trails help save the wilderness. Those who do get up to the higher reaches have put some effort into the hike and appreciate the natural beauty. There is practically no litter up there.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 15, 2014 @ 7:23 pm

  13. Hi Montucky, I like your views as usual. The trail is well developed and looks easy to follow which is a good thing for you hikers. I like your picture of the loose pile of rocks that have fallen down the slope. Neat. Have a wonderful Thursday!

    Like

    Comment by wildlifewatcher — October 15, 2014 @ 1:15 pm

    • I’m glad that you like the views! Yes, this is a very good trail for an area like that and very pleasant to hike on it. Have a great weekend!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 15, 2014 @ 7:26 pm

  14. These are gorgeous photos. What an incredible place!

    Like

    Comment by Sue — October 16, 2014 @ 11:19 am

  15. What an amazing place, Montucky!

    Like

    Comment by Watching Seasons — October 17, 2014 @ 5:30 pm

    • It really is. I’ve now made seven trips into this Wilderness and I will make many more, I’m sure. Seems like each one is prettier than the one before.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — October 17, 2014 @ 7:27 pm

  16. So Montana
    and an exquisite walk and photos!

    Like

    Comment by Tammie — October 18, 2014 @ 9:06 pm

  17. Reblogged this on Phase Three and commented:
    Where we are going this spring … and the photos tell why. Awesome!

    Like

    Comment by pallix — March 10, 2015 @ 6:29 pm


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