Montana Outdoors

June 25, 2014

Three-spot Mariposa Lily

Pointedtip Mariposa Lily, Three-spot Mariposa Lily, Baker's Mariposa

Pointedtip Mariposa Lily, Three-spot Mariposa Lily, Baker’s Mariposa ~ Calochortus apiculatus ~ Found only in Canada’s British Columbia and Alberta and in Oregon, Idaho and Montana in the U.S.

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34 Comments »

  1. Oh my lord, the world is an amazing place … what a beautiful image.

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    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — June 25, 2014 @ 8:40 pm

    • Yes. I feel that every time I look closely at a wildflower, and especially so in the wilderness.

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      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2014 @ 10:18 pm

  2. I feel like I could stare at this flower forever. I just can’t get over it. Remember when girls wore little angora collars with their sweaters? That’s what this looks like – so soft and fuzzy and appealing. It’s just extraordinary.

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    Comment by shoreacres — June 25, 2014 @ 9:02 pm

    • I remember those collars.
      There are perhaps a hundred species in this genus and the half dozen that I’ve seen are all beautiful. I also like the names. The genus comes from the Greek ‘kalo’ meaning “beautiful” and ‘chortos’ Meaning “grass”. “Mariposa” is Spanish for butterfly.

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      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2014 @ 10:29 pm

  3. What a unique flower!

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    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 25, 2014 @ 10:27 pm

    • It is. I spend every summer in amazement at all of the different and beautiful wildflowers.

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      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2014 @ 10:38 pm

  4. I’ll have to keep my eyes open for these. Avery unique flower!

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    Comment by Mother Hen — June 25, 2014 @ 10:36 pm

    • They like rather dry, grassy slopes and open woodlands and grow at many different elevations. They’re about the size of a silver dollar and the blossoms are usually around 6 inches from the ground, making them fairly easy to see if they are present.

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      Comment by montucky — June 25, 2014 @ 10:42 pm

  5. Really interesting; if this can grow in Oregon and BC I think I can get it to grow in the Puget Sound area. I am going to the BC Botanical site to check this out, great post.

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    Comment by Charlie@Seattle Trekker — June 25, 2014 @ 11:23 pm

    • My favorite book on plants states that there are cultivated mariposa lilies sold through garden outlets (probably in Canada where the book was published). Also that they will propagate from seed but it takes 3 – 5 years to produce a flowering bulb.

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      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 8:00 am

  6. Again Your photo amazed me. Beautiful.

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    Comment by Sartenada — June 26, 2014 @ 2:41 am

  7. Beautiful and strange in equal measure! I’ve never seen anything quite like this. What a great photo!

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    Comment by Jo Woolf — June 26, 2014 @ 5:13 am

    • At a casual glance they are just white flowers, but when you look closely there’s a lot more to them/

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      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 8:02 am

  8. This flower looks quite different from the Mariposa lily we see in the sierras of CA. It’s hairy!!

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    Comment by Sue — June 26, 2014 @ 7:20 am

    • The “beard” seems to appear as the blossom ages and this one was mature. I’ve seen blossoms of the same species that don’t exhibit the hair.

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      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 8:03 am

  9. I don’t think I’ve ever seen this before even when we lived in Oregon. It looks so fuzzy, is it?

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    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — June 26, 2014 @ 7:23 am

    • The “hairs” are so delicate that I can’t actually feel them. The whole blossom is smaller than a silver dollar. Several species possess the “beards”.

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      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 8:06 am

  10. Beautiful and unique flower.
    My summer imagination is flowing … I see the face of a fuzzy older gentleman with beard and bushy eyebrows saying “oh”. 😉

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    Comment by bearyweather — June 26, 2014 @ 8:32 am

    • Now I’m getting worried… I immediately saw what you did!

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      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 8:45 pm

      • Don’t worry … imagination is great!
        (right?)
        Or, are you telling me subtly that I am crazy? 😉

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        Comment by bearyweather — June 27, 2014 @ 3:52 pm

        • If you’re crazy then we both are. Actually, that “older gentleman” resembles a friend of mine.

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          Comment by montucky — June 27, 2014 @ 7:31 pm

  11. Very nice! Nothing like that in Ohio.

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    Comment by centralohionature — June 26, 2014 @ 10:37 am

    • They live in a very limited area and yet they are abundant where they do live. Strange.

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      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 8:45 pm

  12. The thing that strikes me when I look at this flower (new to me, btw) is that it is so hairy – not that it has three spots. Maybe there’s another in the genus with the hair, but without three spots.

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    Comment by jomegat — June 26, 2014 @ 4:06 pm

    • Yes, there are others with much different coloration that have the same amount of hair. I don’t understand its purpose, but it seems to be successful.

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      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 8:46 pm

  13. Very cool Terry never seen anything like it, awesome !!

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    Comment by Bernie Kasper — June 26, 2014 @ 4:08 pm

    • I hiked a ways on a trail today and saw thousands of these. They are very prolific!

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      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 8:47 pm

  14. Haven’t seen this variety. Wonderful.

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    Comment by Lynn Millar — June 26, 2014 @ 4:58 pm

  15. What amazing petals. I don’t think I’ve ever seen any so hairy! These are the kind of flowers that really get me wondering.

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    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 26, 2014 @ 5:14 pm

    • I wonder too, especially since the hairs seem to come with the age of the blossom. I saw hundreds today which looked like younger ones that had very little of the hair.

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      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 8:50 pm

  16. I like its “fuzziness.” Like your other commenter said, it does remind one of an angora collar.

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    Comment by Candace — June 28, 2014 @ 8:06 pm

    • I like the “fuzziness” too. I see traces of it on many other flowers too but never to this extent. I don’t understand the benefit though.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 28, 2014 @ 8:16 pm


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