Montana Outdoors

June 18, 2014

Sure ’nuff!

Filed under: Nature, Outdoors — Tags: , , , — montucky @ 7:09 pm

Clark-Hinchwood road June 18

Well, they said there was snow above 5,000 feet…this photo was taken at noon today at 5,500 feet

Clark-Hinchwood road June 18

Clark-Hinchwood road June 18

Clark-Hinchwood road June 18

Clark-Hinchwood road June 18

It’s not easy finding white flowers in this weather.

Beargrass in June snow

Groundsel in June snow

Oregon grape in June snow

Groundsel in June snow

Groundsel in June snow

Beargrass in June snow

Beargrass in June snow

Beargrass in June snow

Mariposa lily in June snow

Beargrass in June snow

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40 Comments »

  1. Doesn’t look like Spring. Sperry Chalet in Glacier had about 14 inches.

    Like

    Comment by Malcolm R. Campbell — June 18, 2014 @ 7:27 pm

    • There was quite a bit here too, higher up. I turned around at about 5,500 feet, where there was about 6 inches. The clouds were down and visibility was also low. I had intended to go higher but that wasn’t a good idea today.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 18, 2014 @ 9:12 pm

  2. I can see those poor flowers shivering! Do you realize it’s the first day of summer in a couple of days?

    Like

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 18, 2014 @ 7:46 pm

    • I’m loving this weather. Our summers have been in drought condition for several years and this is so nice to see. It was very cloudy and rainy today and those who stayed in the valley didn’t even know there was snow higher up.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 18, 2014 @ 9:14 pm

      • There’s a lot they don’t know if they don’t get out to the places you go.

        Like

        Comment by wordsfromanneli — June 18, 2014 @ 9:18 pm

        • That’s true. I’m glad I have a camera that lets me bring back some of the scenes out there.

          Like

          Comment by montucky — June 18, 2014 @ 10:06 pm

  3. Hard to believe it’s summer on your side of the world.

    Lovely series of images. You’ve captured that freezing cold atmosphere perfectly. I’m surprised the flowers haven’t wilted in that recent snow, but maybe they’ve just frozen solid which has kept their freshness – lol

    Like

    Comment by Vicki — June 18, 2014 @ 8:27 pm

    • The temperatures weren’t too low up there, probably in the low 30’s. This isn’t the first June snow those plants have seen. I love to see it when it comes and can’t resist getting out in it.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 18, 2014 @ 9:18 pm

  4. I’m glad you found them!

    Like

    Comment by Harold Rhenisch — June 19, 2014 @ 12:09 am

    • In the areas of heavy snow it looked as though many of the blossom heads had broken off, but lower I could see a lot that had not yet bloomed, so it should be very pretty next week.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 9:16 am

  5. Wow-what a testament to the toughness of those plants! Does the fog mean the air was warming, or was it raining?

    Like

    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — June 19, 2014 @ 4:43 am

    • The pictures were actually taken in the clouds. As I drove up there I hit the cloud level at about 4,000 feet and there were still dense clouds at 5,500. It was raining but at that level in the clouds, the rain was still forming so it wasn’t falling very far. Interesting to be in a cloud when it is forming rain!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 9:19 am

  6. Wow, that’s an amazing sight to see! Do the mountains usually get fresh snowfall around this time of year? There is still some snow lingering on the tops in the Highlands of Scotland but we won’t have any fresh snow for months. Those flowers are beautiful, too… it’s a hard and short season they have to cope with!

    Like

    Comment by Jo Woolf — June 19, 2014 @ 4:45 am

    • It’s not unusual to get a snowfall in June. Doesn’t happen every year, but it’s never surprising and it has to be considered when going into the high country!
      The plants that grow there are amazing in their toughness.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 9:22 am

  7. Hope you were dressed appropriately!

    Like

    Comment by Tammy — June 19, 2014 @ 7:15 am

    • Yes, always! My pack always contains what I need to stay warm and dry. It’s actually this time of year when there is the greatest danger of hypothermia, not in winter itself.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 9:25 am

  8. This weather is so strange,wonder where’s heading for our future? You have always done some amazing pictures!

    Like

    Comment by niteflyrwomanAmanda — June 19, 2014 @ 7:37 am

    • After coming out of drought conditions over the last several years, it’s a wonderful change to have a very wet spring. Our western valleys have received good amounts of rain and higher up it came down as snow. I can’t resist getting out in it!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 9:28 am

  9. Amazing the flowers are surviving that cold wet stuff. As for the white stuff, it has not been gone here long enough to miss it even a little bit. 😉
    Your first few pictures were bringing back winter nightmares (that took place just a month or so ago), I did not even want to look … but, you promised flowers.
    Very nice ones.
    Wonder if they would grow here in the snow? … might make these extremely long Minnesota winters more bearable.

    Like

    Comment by bearyweather — June 19, 2014 @ 8:01 am

    • The plants that live at the higher elevations have evolved to handle these conditions. They are amazing beings! Beargrass doesn’t grow east of Montana and Wyoming, and it’s found here only over 4,000 feet. I wish I understood the reasons for that, but it seems to have a very successful survival strategy.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 9:36 am

  10. I guess the plants don’t like it. We got snow in the north too, but not for long I hope.

    Like

    Comment by bentehaarstad — June 19, 2014 @ 8:57 am

    • There a many vastly differing elevations and climates in this region and the plant life is suited to each it seems. This will probably be the last snow of this season, but who knows? Over the years I’ve seen snow in every month at some time.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 9:39 am

  11. Great shots! I love the one with the wrangler.

    Like

    Comment by Dana S. Hugh — June 19, 2014 @ 9:16 am

    • Thanks Dana! That old Jeep has seen a lot of Montana back country and will have a lot more in its future!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 9:41 am

  12. An I thought I had a long winter … 🙂 Beautiful images … the one of your vehicle on the edge of that snowy road with the drop … a wonderful quality to it … and I love the tracks in the snowy road ..

    Like

    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — June 19, 2014 @ 9:18 am

    • That drop to the side of the Jeep goes down a long, long way! I was tempted to keep going but the visibility was so low it wouldn’t have been possible to see much and I was already 8 miles from the highway. I just love days like that!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 9:43 am

  13. Wooo! Would you look at that? As long as it provides water needed for drought conditions, it must be a welcome sight even a few days before summer officially gets here. 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — June 19, 2014 @ 11:18 am

    • Most of that snow has already melted, but it’s sure good to have the water!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 7:22 pm

  14. Wonderful pics, and I’m so glad to see that slushy, wet snow. We used to have occasional Easters in Iowa when there would be tulips and forsythia blooming in late snows. As you mentioned, if the temperature isn’t too cold, the flowers actually seem to like it. I got curious, and went looking to see what temperatures are recommended for floral coolers. I found one trade paper that said cut flowers should be cooled to 33-35, and then maintained around 38 degrees. I suspect your flowers were pretty happy.

    Like

    Comment by shoreacres — June 19, 2014 @ 2:41 pm

    • That’s probably the temperature range most of these nights above 5,000 feet, and with additional moisture I’ll bet the flowers are very happy!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 19, 2014 @ 7:25 pm

  15. Amazing! At least you are able to catch up on the winter trips that you missed while recuperating!

    Like

    Comment by Candace — June 20, 2014 @ 10:48 pm

    • This was probably the last meaningful snow now until fall, but who knows? It was nice to be in the clouds for awhile in a “winter” world! The temps for next week are expected to be in the 80’s.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 20, 2014 @ 10:59 pm

  16. In June even! Crazy-beautiful!

    Like

    Comment by Watching Seasons — June 22, 2014 @ 3:30 pm

    • That was a rather heavy snow for June, but worth a short drive to see!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 22, 2014 @ 7:58 pm

  17. That is amazing Terry !!!

    Like

    Comment by Bernie Kasper — June 23, 2014 @ 12:03 pm

  18. Looks a little strange from where you are, doesn’t it! A little snow in June here isn’t rare, but this was quite a bit.

    Like

    Comment by montucky — June 23, 2014 @ 7:16 pm

  19. wow, you found more snow than we got, maybe an inch. i should have posted a photo. I did on FB, so i think i forgot. nice to see your June snow!

    Like

    Comment by Tammie — June 24, 2014 @ 9:58 pm

    • Outside of seeing flowers sticking up out of the snow it looked like mid-winter. There was a lot of water in that snow too!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 24, 2014 @ 10:28 pm

  20. Wow, snow. Beautiful set of photos. My favorite on is the first one and Your car photo. Thank You showing it again.

    Like

    Comment by Sartenada — June 26, 2014 @ 2:36 am

    • When we get those summer snows I just can’t keep from getting into them.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — June 26, 2014 @ 7:55 am


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