Montana Outdoors

April 18, 2014

Going around in a circle

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , — montucky @ 9:35 pm

Peak Saxifrage ~ Micranthes nidifica

Peak Saxifrage ~ Micranthes nidifica

Peak Saxifrage ~ Micranthes nidifica

I had to laugh tonight while looking for more information about this rather odd wildflower (or herb as some sources call it). The 8th source that showed up in a Google search was this site which was my own blog post from about this same time last year.

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38 Comments »

  1. You’re becoming the peak saxifrage authority!

    Like

    Comment by aarontheisen — April 18, 2014 @ 9:37 pm

    • I guess. About the same as the definition of an “expert” as someone who knows a little about the subject at hand, but lives over a hundred miles away.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 18, 2014 @ 9:41 pm

  2. That’s because you’re famous now!

    Like

    Comment by wordsfromanneli — April 18, 2014 @ 10:17 pm

  3. Amazing little flower!

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    Comment by centralohionature — April 19, 2014 @ 4:28 am

    • It is very strange, and very hardy. Very different from the other saxifragae that I’m seen.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2014 @ 7:37 am

  4. I can see the resemblance of our saxifragas’s, but this one is naked!

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    Comment by bentehaarstad — April 19, 2014 @ 4:33 am

    • It’s different enough that I took me several years to first identify it.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2014 @ 7:37 am

  5. Memory is a great thing when it works! That’s an unusual little flower.

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    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — April 19, 2014 @ 5:24 am

    • Yes it’s very unusual. Lots of things going on with it.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2014 @ 7:38 am

  6. Haha, that means you’re now an accepted authority on Saxifrages! The world bows to your Saxifrage knowledge! 🙂 Gorgeous photos, especially the first one.

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    Comment by Jo Woolf — April 19, 2014 @ 5:59 am

    • Who knows how Google works. There was a very stiif wind coming off the river that day but the plant is so sturdy it stood pretty still.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2014 @ 7:40 am

  7. Nice to see these photographs of a flower most folks have never heard of.

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    Comment by Malcolm R. Campbell — April 19, 2014 @ 6:23 am

    • It doesn’t get much attention, probably because most overlook it . It really takes a close look to see all of its features and doesn’t have large showy petals like other flowers.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2014 @ 7:42 am

  8. I think nidifica was coined to mean ‘makes nests.’ I guess each flower could be seen as a sort of nest. Nice closeup.

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    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — April 19, 2014 @ 6:59 am

    • I could see a nest shape in some of the various phases of the blossoms. Hadn’t thought of it though.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2014 @ 7:43 am

  9. Highly amusing, Terry.

    It’s a great photo anyway. Remarkable detail and focus on that first shot. It such an attractive little flower and most unusual in shape.

    (would you believe that’s the way I found many names to put to my flower archives – from turning up an image on my own blog from 3 years ago). I’ve still got about 20 flower images to identify yet.

    Like

    Comment by Vicki — April 19, 2014 @ 7:01 am

    • I’m glad I’m not the only one! I’ve found over 200 different species of wildflowers in the approximately 1500 square miles through which I wander, and from year to year I can’t remember all of them. I did compile a file of over 800 photos for a wildflower website that published them and I often refresh my memory from that collection.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2014 @ 7:47 am

  10. Interesting where the information we post goes. I’m always amazed when I run across something of mine in a place I would never have expected to see it. I’m sure you feel the same.

    Like

    Comment by anniespickns — April 19, 2014 @ 7:13 am

    • Yes, and sometimes I review the viewing activity from the WordPress stats and see activity on some very old posts that must be the result of searches.

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      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2014 @ 7:50 am

  11. That is so funny I was just talking about this on my latest blog post Terry, to me the photography is easy it is the identification that is so hard, great shots btw !!

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    Comment by Bernie Kasper — April 19, 2014 @ 8:45 am

    • Yes, the identification can be really hard. I think even more so here where there are so few people that few things are published specifically for this area. I use primarily a book that was published in British Columbia and a website at the U of Washington in Seattle.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 19, 2014 @ 4:38 pm

  12. What a little charmer that wildflower is … I trust this was not followed by another five feet of snow … 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — April 19, 2014 @ 5:21 pm

    • Strange little flower, isn’t it! Ironically, there is snow forecast for here on Wednesday. Probably nothing mush in the valleys, but up to 4 inches up higher.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2014 @ 7:15 pm

  13. I remembered the name from last year, though not the appearance of the flower. Saxifrage sounds a bit like Saxon to me. It certainly does look like it would fit right into a castle’s landscape. The nest reference is interesting, too. It’s just a strange little flower.

    Like

    Comment by shoreacres — April 19, 2014 @ 6:40 pm

    • The saxifrage family has a varied collection of flowers and I seem to find a new one about every year. I found one today that I must have always overlooked, probably because this on is very tiny. They do have some very pretty members in that family!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2014 @ 7:18 pm

  14. Funny! Good thing you are a knowledgeable source.

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    Comment by Sue — April 19, 2014 @ 10:33 pm

    • I wish I were much more knowledgeable, but I’m afraid it’s my more my nature to explore and find things than to study them in detail.

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      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2014 @ 7:19 pm

  15. You know you have an internet presence when everything points back to you 🙂

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    Comment by Candace — April 20, 2014 @ 10:17 pm

    • I’m afraid that my internet presence mostly involves the existence of obscure things. Doing my part to fill some vacuums.

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      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2014 @ 7:21 pm

  16. Full circle! So cool. 🙂

    Like

    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — April 21, 2014 @ 7:50 am

    • Yes, interesting circle, but not helpful for my research. I do think though that some of my posts help others to identify or understand some things.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 21, 2014 @ 7:23 pm

  17. Beautiful photos, thank you for sharing them!

    Like

    Comment by David — April 22, 2014 @ 8:55 am

    • Thank you for visiting, David. I’m glad that you enjoyed the photos.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 22, 2014 @ 8:05 pm

  18. I love this family of flowers
    they are so unique, tiny and precious!

    Like

    Comment by Tammie — April 25, 2014 @ 3:20 pm

    • It is a very pretty and interesting family, and I seem to find another member every year. There seems to be no end to our wildflower species!

      Like

      Comment by montucky — April 25, 2014 @ 8:06 pm


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