Montana Outdoors

May 1, 2013

Aging so beautifully…

Filed under: Munson Creek, Wildflowers — Tags: , , — montucky @ 9:45 pm

Their petals change to pink or purple as they age.

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium

Pacific Trillium, Trillium ovatum  ~ found blooming today at Munson Creek

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51 Comments »

  1. Wish I could age as beautifully! Beautiful captures.

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    Comment by twoscamps — May 1, 2013 @ 9:56 pm

  2. Most pink flowers that I know of tend to fade to white as they age, instead of getting darker. These are beautiful!

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    Comment by Jo Woolf — May 2, 2013 @ 12:26 am

  3. So lovely! Thank you, Ellen

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    Comment by Ellen Grace Olinger — May 2, 2013 @ 2:10 am

  4. Beautiful. I love flowers that change their colour over time. (Leaves too. I’m still trying to track down a shrub my parents had when I was a child, that did that.) I keep coming across Trilliums online, not just in your photos (which are lovely). I wonder why?

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    Comment by Val — May 2, 2013 @ 3:49 am

    • I guess this is their blooming time wherever they grow. These are at the end of the line, and no new ones are blooming at the lower elevations. There are still new ones a few thousand feet higher up, where it is still very early in spring.

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      Comment by montucky — May 2, 2013 @ 8:44 pm

    • My father used to say that coincidences often came in threes for him. Coincidentally, the name trillium appears to come from the Swedish word trilling, meaning triplet, based on the fact that these plants have three leaves and three petals. And I’ll end this comment now that I have three sentences.

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      Comment by Steve Schwartzman — May 3, 2013 @ 5:15 am

  5. That’s interesting. Our red trilliums actually get lighter as they age, and end up looking a lot like these do.

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    Comment by New Hampshire Gardener — May 2, 2013 @ 4:24 am

  6. Beautiful shots. So crisp and clear. I feel like I could touch them.

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    Comment by roberta — May 2, 2013 @ 6:53 am

  7. I went trillium hunting today but came up empty-handed. I’m taking the Pathfinders camping this weekend, so maybe I’ll have better luck then.

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    Comment by jomegat — May 2, 2013 @ 8:17 am

    • Our trilliums here at low elevations are through blooming already. Higher up, they are just starting, but wherever I’m seen them this year they have been smaller than usual. Yesterday I saw some at around 3500 feet and they were tiny. The ground surface still freezes at night there though.

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      Comment by montucky — May 2, 2013 @ 8:49 pm

  8. What an exquisite way to view aging, both the image and the actuol changes that occur… a grand lesson here for us….

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    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — May 2, 2013 @ 8:18 am

    • That is a very interesting characteristic of those flowers. I think the same thing happens in our species too, as long as we let it, perhaps even more as because we also accumulate knowledge (and sometimes even wisdom).

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      Comment by montucky — May 2, 2013 @ 8:53 pm

  9. As they age, they become even more vibrant and beautiful. We humans need to take a lesson from nature on this one, don’t we? Love this!

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    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — May 2, 2013 @ 9:07 am

    • I agree there is a lesson there, something that not everyone has learned.

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      Comment by montucky — May 2, 2013 @ 8:55 pm

  10. Very pretty!

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    Comment by dhphotosite — May 2, 2013 @ 12:27 pm

  11. so lovely when they are white and then in pink
    as are your photographs.

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    Comment by Tammie — May 2, 2013 @ 1:50 pm

    • They are fun here where we can climb to a higher elevation and see new ones go through the color cycle.

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      Comment by montucky — May 2, 2013 @ 8:59 pm

  12. Lovely!

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    Comment by Roberta — May 2, 2013 @ 7:05 pm

  13. Wonderful nature study. Shadows in You photos made them so living.

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    Comment by Sartenada — May 2, 2013 @ 11:11 pm

    • One of the things that I like about photographing wildflowers is the natural lighting. Sometimes it is splendid, other times very challenging.

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      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2013 @ 10:22 pm

  14. I love the top pic, that purple with the light on it, is simply lovely! A difficult colour to photograph well. Cheers! 🙂

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    Comment by janina — May 2, 2013 @ 11:44 pm

    • That is a very pretty blossom, isn’t it! It saw very little sun in its life and seemed to appreciate the sun’s rays that day.

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      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2013 @ 10:24 pm

  15. I’ve heard of trilliums but am not familiar with them, so I did a search for your species at the website of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center and found this information:

    http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=TROV2

    Like

    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — May 3, 2013 @ 5:07 am

    • Thanks Steve. Yes, I’ve seen that. This was not a good year for the trilliums here. They were plentiful, but the blossoms were quite small. We are still having nights in the 20’s.

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      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2013 @ 10:26 pm

  16. Great sequence of shots!

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    Comment by knightofswords — May 3, 2013 @ 10:03 am

    • Thanks Malcolm. I was lucky to come across that variety of pinks.

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      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2013 @ 10:27 pm

  17. When it comes to aging, I suspect these flowers would look better under a sharp fluorescent light than most of us! I do wonder now about our evening primrose. Their color range is so wide, and I’ve always assumed it was a matter of natural variation. Now I wonder if aging might have something to do with it, too. I suspect not, but it will be worth keeping an eye on the huge patches of primrose across the street from me – at least until the mowers show up.

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    Comment by shoreacres — May 3, 2013 @ 11:45 am

    • Yes, surely worth watching. It took several years before I really understood the color change in the trilliums. Other flowers change entirely as they turn to seed as do the clematis and Prairie Smoke.

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      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2013 @ 10:30 pm

  18. They look pretty at every stage.

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    Comment by Candace — May 3, 2013 @ 12:32 pm

    • They sure are. I’ve even seen some that turn quite transparent when wet.

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      Comment by montucky — May 3, 2013 @ 10:30 pm

  19. I love this about Trilliums. Our just started blooming yesterday and start out pure white, but will be pink by the time they are done. They don’t get the deep purple that yours do, though. So pretty!

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    Comment by kateri — May 4, 2013 @ 9:53 am

    • It looks as though you have many species of them there. We have just one.

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      Comment by montucky — May 4, 2013 @ 10:59 pm

  20. I think I’m going to focus on turning my petals pink as I age too! Lovely trillium.

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    Comment by Tammy — May 4, 2013 @ 12:02 pm

    • You know, perhaps many of us do that too really, but in a mental or spiritual sense not a physical one.

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      Comment by montucky — May 4, 2013 @ 11:00 pm

  21. ohhh so pretty =)

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    Comment by Tricia — May 4, 2013 @ 1:13 pm

  22. I especially love the color in the first photo. It made me immediately think of eggplant. 🙂

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    Comment by Bill — May 5, 2013 @ 7:12 am

    • It is that shade, isn’t it! A rather unusual color in nature.

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      Comment by montucky — May 5, 2013 @ 9:42 pm

  23. “Saving the best for the last”, you put it nicely and rightly, montucky. I love this special purple.

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    Comment by isathreadsoflife — May 5, 2013 @ 1:43 pm

    • I do too. You have to encounter them at exactly the right time to see that color.

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      Comment by montucky — May 5, 2013 @ 9:44 pm

  24. Very nice! Why can’t I age as gracefully as this?

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    Comment by WildBill — May 6, 2013 @ 5:10 am

  25. Trillium is one of my favorite forest flowers. It is one of our special treasures.

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    Comment by Charlie@Seattle Trekker — May 8, 2013 @ 10:23 pm

    • It is indeed a special flower. This has not been a good year for them in this area though. They are plentiful but very small. Perhaps they will be better at the higher elevations as the snow clears up there.

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      Comment by montucky — May 8, 2013 @ 10:37 pm


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