Montana Outdoors

May 16, 2012

Tritelia and Geranium

Large-flowered Tritelia, Brodiaea douglasii

Large-flowered Tritelia, Brodiaea douglasii

Large-flowered Tritelia, Brodiaea douglasii

Large-flowered Tritelia, Brodiaea douglasii, Triteleia grandiflora, May 9

Sticky Geranium

Sticky Geranium, Geranium viscosissimum, May13

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28 Comments »

  1. The tritelia especially seem made of silk. The second photo appeals to me especially. I’ve not heard of the sticky geranium – but I’m just discovering some new varieties developed for home gardeners. It’s hard to believe we’re going to be past geranium season in a couple of months. It gets too hot for them, and unless they’re really babied, they don’t make it through summer.

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    Comment by shoreacres — May 16, 2012 @ 9:56 pm

    • The sticky geranium seems to grow only in the far western states and western Canada. They seem to be blooming here a few weeks early this year, but we will see them through the end of summer because most of them grow in shade and toward the end of summer will still be blooming at higher elevations.

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      Comment by montucky — May 16, 2012 @ 10:44 pm

  2. Such a pretty shade of blue on the tritelia and with the geranium, I hear a familiar name, finally 🙂

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    Comment by Candace — May 16, 2012 @ 10:27 pm

    • The tritelia come in a variety of shades, from nearly white to fairly dark blue. I first thought that was phases, but now I think it’s just color variations plant-to-plant. Yes, Geranium is a familiar name and I was completely surprised (and pleased) when I found them growing wild here. With a large splash of color like they have they are easy to spot too!

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      Comment by montucky — May 16, 2012 @ 10:47 pm

  3. I’m really enjoying these posts about your wild flowers!

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    Comment by Jo Woolf — May 17, 2012 @ 1:04 am

    • Thanks for the feedback, Jo. They have a very special fascination for me because of where they grow and that there are so many species of them. There are wildflowers from the valley floor at about 2400 feet to the tallest peaks around and in terrain that range from near desert to near rainforest, full sun to deep shade.

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:08 pm

  4. absolutely gorgeous, as is each flower in the post before, you have a wonderful style of photographing up close captures!

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    Comment by Tammie — May 17, 2012 @ 11:04 am

    • Thank you tammie. I try to show them the way I imagine they would like to be seen.

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:09 pm

  5. That wild geranium, looks like the one in my garden, but nothing like the pale one we have here along the beach. Love the blue flowers. They have captured your Montana sky.

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    Comment by sandy — May 17, 2012 @ 2:58 pm

    • We have several species of Geraniums here. I’m not familiar with other areas, but I suspect there are many different species across the country. All tht I’ve seen are very pretty.

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:13 pm

  6. I really like that second shot. Magnificent! I’ve never even heard of Tritelia, but I sure like it!

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    Comment by jomegat — May 17, 2012 @ 4:54 pm

    • As far as I can tell, they are native only to the far west array of states, They are very common in this particular area.

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:20 pm

  7. Gorgeous macros, such detail and color!

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    Comment by bayphotosbydonna — May 17, 2012 @ 7:33 pm

  8. I cannot stop to be amazed how great You present flowers. In this series my favorite are blue Tritelias. Blue is calming color! That’s why blue cars do not cause aggressions in the traffic.

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    Comment by Sartenada — May 17, 2012 @ 11:21 pm

    • thanks! Yes, blue is a calming color, and we have lots of blue wildflowers; perhaps for that reason?

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:22 pm

  9. Wow, I love that Large-flowered Tritelia. The unopened buds remind me of a gentian. A geranium that might be carnivorous? That’s the strangest thing I’ve heard all day!

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    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 18, 2012 @ 8:10 am

    • I wasn’t aware of that about the geranium until you noted it! Amazing! I doubt that it’s widely understood.

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:23 pm

      • When you post an interesting plant I’ve never heard of I usually go and read about it, and when I found that scientists think the stickiness might be associated with carnivorousness I was amazed. A carnivorous geranium!?

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        Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 19, 2012 @ 2:30 am

  10. Super photos Montucky! You have such variety of wildflowers in them thar hills…keep them coming as long as you can!!!

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    Comment by dhphotosite — May 18, 2012 @ 2:05 pm

    • Thanks David. I sure will! I haven’t been out lately, but I plan to be in the next week. Trout season opens this weekend and I usually end up fishing a little and photographing wildflowers a lot.

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:25 pm

  11. Lovely!!! Trying to get a comment to work again! Hope it does!

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    Comment by Stacey Dawn — May 18, 2012 @ 8:16 pm

    • Thanks Stacey. Yay, it worked! I never did figure out what that problem was.

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:25 pm

  12. I almost always like blue flowers. These are very showy.

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    Comment by knightofswords — May 18, 2012 @ 8:23 pm

    • Yes, these are very showy, and fairly good sized for wildflowers. They also stand quite tall.

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:26 pm

  13. The tritelia are a favorite of mine, too. I’ve also heard them called “Wild Hyacinth” and they do look sort of similar. Another name for the wild geraniums is “Cranesbill” for the shape of the elongated pistil(?) after fertilization. Wonderful photos, Montuck!

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    Comment by Kim — May 18, 2012 @ 9:13 pm

    • I’ve seen them called “Wild Hyacinth” too, but for the life of my I can’t remember where it was.

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      Comment by montucky — May 18, 2012 @ 11:32 pm


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