Montana Outdoors

May 11, 2012

Mountain Lady’s slipper

Filed under: Wildflowers — Tags: , , — montucky @ 9:14 pm

Mountain Lady's slipper

Mountain Lady's slipper

Mountain Lady's slipper

Mountain Lady's slipper

Mountain Lady’s slipper, Cypripedium montanum

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38 Comments »

  1. So they’re related to the fairyslipper? Also beautiful!

    Like

    Comment by Candace — May 11, 2012 @ 9:53 pm

    • They are, the family of orchids. These are growing in a place where I’ve never seen them before, and earlier than the others.

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      Comment by montucky — May 11, 2012 @ 11:12 pm

  2. You make it clear why this orchid is named what it is.

    Steve Schwartzman
    http://portraitsofwildflowers.wordpress.com

    Like

    Comment by Steve Schwartzman — May 11, 2012 @ 10:08 pm

    • Yes, I think it is quite well-named. The Okanagan people called them “moccasins”.

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:30 pm

  3. These are just exquisite. The perfect white slipper is incredible – how does nature make that? Amazing.

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    Comment by Jo Woolf — May 12, 2012 @ 1:31 am

    • The slipper is actually the lower petal that forms a lip in that shape. How or why I have no idea!

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:33 pm

  4. Great job of photographing the whole plant. I have never seen one but will certainly recognize one if I see one now.

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    Comment by Grampy — May 12, 2012 @ 1:35 am

    • Yes once you see one they are easier to find if they are around. These, like the Fairyslipper, usually like to hide beneath low brush.

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:35 pm

  5. They are beautiful, fleeting things. Ours haven’t bloomed yet. I’m hoping I can find a few yellow ones this year, which are rare here.

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    Comment by New Hampshire Garden Solutions — May 12, 2012 @ 4:35 am

    • I’ve read that there are yellow ones in this region too, but I’ve never found one. These seem to be very early for here and I found them in an unusual place too.

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:36 pm

  6. Lovely photos. What a treat to encounter them. The Showy Lady’s Slipper is Minnesota’s state flower. I haven’t seen one for many years. I’d love to change that this summer. i will keep my eyes peeled.

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    Comment by Teresa Evangeline — May 12, 2012 @ 6:10 am

    • I usually encounter some of these in my normal wanderings, but if I didn’t I would seek them out just to make summer complete!

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:37 pm

  7. Now this one really looks like a ballet slipper with wings. How many wild orchids do you have there?

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    Comment by sandy — May 12, 2012 @ 7:22 am

    • As far as I can tell we have about a dozen wild orchids here, but I have not found all of them yet.

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:37 pm

  8. Maybe not as showy as the pink ones, but a beauty none the less. Thanks for sharing, Montucky.

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    Comment by Kim — May 12, 2012 @ 10:33 am

    • They are a little larger than the Fairyslippers and I think a little more plentiful as well.

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:40 pm

  9. Another fascinating round of photos! You have quite a catalog of gorgeous flowers out there!

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    Comment by Mama's Empty Nest — May 12, 2012 @ 12:00 pm

    • A “catalog” is a very good way to put it! Yes, there are lots of species and I’m sure I haven’t encountered all of them either. Sure is fun to try though!

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:41 pm

  10. It DOES look just like a slipper!! Very pretty!

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    Comment by allbymyself09 — May 12, 2012 @ 12:31 pm

    • Yes, I think the name fits. I also liked the Indians calling them “moccasins”.

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:43 pm

  11. Hi Montucky, Very beautiful blooms! You take great macro’s. Have a super nice day!

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    Comment by wildlifewatcher — May 12, 2012 @ 12:57 pm

    • Thanks! I love the wildflowers very much and try to show them at their best.

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      Comment by montucky — May 12, 2012 @ 10:44 pm

  12. Oh..these are the most exquisite of wildflowers. Stunning capture!

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    Comment by Marcie — May 12, 2012 @ 4:18 pm

  13. Very lovely indeed. I have a couple of pink lady’s slippers (C. acuale) blooming here, but they don’t hold a candle to your mountain lady slippers.

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    Comment by jomegat — May 12, 2012 @ 11:50 pm

    • I’ve heard that we have some pink ones here too, but I’ve never found them. I would sure like to!

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      Comment by montucky — May 13, 2012 @ 9:24 pm

  14. Very pretty! I have not seen lady slippers of any kind since moving to michigan…though I know they are are here…somewere!

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    Comment by kateri — May 13, 2012 @ 5:58 am

    • It was quite a while before I found ladyslippers here too and now it seems that they show up everywhere although they have a rather brief blooming period. With most of our wildflowers you have to be in the right place at the right time to see them. There’s one, the Waterleaf, that I look for every year. I have seen only one and that was in the least likely place I could imagine.

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      Comment by montucky — May 13, 2012 @ 9:28 pm

  15. Aren’t they one of the loveliest kinds of flowers? Love the white with the yellow accent. Ours are all white.

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    Comment by Bo Mackison (@bo_mackison) — May 13, 2012 @ 7:28 am

    • They are very pretty. I can’t get over the design and the colors. And the fact that they are orchids!

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      Comment by montucky — May 13, 2012 @ 9:47 pm

  16. I still can’t get my mind around orchids in Montana – or these other states. Somehow they’ve gotten paired with “tropical” in my mind, and I obviously need to shake those assumptions loose!

    The flowers are lovely, but I have to laugh just a bit – they not only look like slippers, they look remarkably like those hospital slippers with the non-skid on the bottom and the elastic around the top. I’ll try and adjust my mental slipper imagery, too!

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    Comment by shoreacres — May 13, 2012 @ 9:42 am

    • When I first encountered the Calypso Bulbosa here and identified it as an orchid I was very surprised too, thinking “tropical” myself. Since, I’ve found also the Ladyslipper, the Coral Root and the White Bog-orchid.

      The book that I use most regarding plants in this area (Plants of Southern Interior British Columbia and the Inland Northwest) is a very good resource for plants in this area as well as our neighbors to the north and it lists 17 species of orchids in the region. All but the Fairyslipper and the Ladyslipper are fairly tall with the blossoms along a single tall stem.

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      Comment by montucky — May 13, 2012 @ 9:45 pm

  17. Now this is a flower with lots of character!

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    Comment by Watching Seasons — May 14, 2012 @ 10:25 am

  18. Excellent photos Montucky…the detail is superb…well done!!!

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    Comment by dhphotosite — May 14, 2012 @ 1:19 pm

  19. I love lady slippers. I will be out in a few weeks looking for ours .. the showy are my favorite.

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    Comment by bearyweather — May 15, 2012 @ 4:43 pm

    • I hope you find them. My summer wouldn’t be complete without seeing some. These are very early and in a strange location. Last evening I visited a place where they usually bloom in good numbers but there were none even showing yet. This has been a strange year.

      Like

      Comment by montucky — May 15, 2012 @ 8:49 pm


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